Plural Policing: A Comparative Perspective

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Trevor Jones, Tim Newburn
Routledge, 2006 - 242 ページ
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Policing is changing rapidly and radically. An increasingly complex array of public, private and municipal bodies - as well as public police forces - are engaged in the provision of regulation and security. Consequently, it is difficult to think of security provision primarily in terms of what the public police do, and so the terminology of 'fragmented' or 'plural' policing systems has become well-established within criminology and police science.

'Plural policing' is now a central issue within criminology and police studies throughout the world, and there is now a large and growing body of research and theory concerned with its extent, nature and governance. To date, however, this work has been dominated by Anglo-American perspectives. This volume takes a detailed comparative look at the development of plural policing, and provides the most up-to-date work of reference for scholars in this field.

Edited by two of the world's leading authorities on policing, and including individual contributions from internationally recognised experts in criminology and police studies, this is the first ever volume to focus on 'plural policing' internationally, and to draw together empirical evidence on its developments in a formal comparative framework.

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著者について (2006)

Mr Trevor Jones is a lecturer in Criminology at the University of Edinburgh. Prior to this he worked at the Policy Studies Institute in London for eight years.
Dr Tim Newburn is head of Crime, Justice and Youth Studies at the Policy Studies Institute and Visiting Professor, Goldsmiths College, London. He previously worked at the Home Office Research and Planning Unit and at the National Institute for Social Work.

Tim Newburn is Professor of Criminology and Social Policy, and Head of Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. He is the author or editor of 35 books, the most recent of which are The Sage Handbook of Criminological Theory (edited with Eugene McLaughlin, 2010) and The Eternal Recurrence of Crime and Control (edited with David Downes and Dick Hobbs, Clarendon Press, 2010). Tim was previously the editor of the journal Policy Studies, and was the founding editor of the Sage journal Criminology and Criminal Justice. He is a former Director of the Mannheim Centre for Criminology at the LSE and a past President of the British Society of Criminology. Tim s primary research interests have been in crime and criminal justice policy, the sociology and governance of policing and security, disadvantaged and disaffected young people, youth crime and youth justice, drugs and alcohol, and comparative criminal justice policy-making and policy transfer. He has recently been involved in a study of the August 2011 English riots. An innovative project which aimed to undertake high quality social research at a speed and in a way that maximised opportunities for influencing public debate, Reading the Riots was run jointly with The Guardian, and its initial results were published in their entirety in the newspaper. Currently, together with Professors David Downes and Paul Rock, Tim is currently engaged in researching and writing of an Official History of Post-war Criminal Justice.

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