The Religious Traditions of Japan 500-1600

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Cambridge University Press, 2005/09/15 - 485 ページ
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Richard Bowring traces the development of Japanese religious thought and practice from the introduction of writing to the point at which medieval attitudes gave way to a distinctive pre-modern culture, a change that brought an end to the dominance of religious institutions. A wide range of approaches using the resources of art, history, social and intellectual history, as well as doctrine is brought to bear on the subject in order to give as full a picture as possible of the richness of the Japanese tradition and an overview of how Buddhism and Shintõ interacted in Japanese culture.
  

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目次

The introduction of Buddhism
15
12 Patronage at court
19
13 The Beetlewing cabinet
23
Creating a dynasty
36
22 Native beliefs
38
23 The Jingikan
41
24 Inventing the past
46
Buddhism and the early state
54
For and against exclusive practice of the nenbutsu
245
112 Myōe
253
113 Shinran
262
Religious culture of the early middle ages
267
122 Todaiji and he
268
123 Of deer and monkeys
274
124 A dream of swords and sheaths
280
Chan Buddhism
287

32 Sutras to protect the state
64
33 The Medicine King and the Pensive Prince
68
Monuments at Nara
77
42 Todaiji
78
44 Explaining anomalies
88
45 Hachiman
91
46 Twice a sovereign
94
47 Buddhist scholarship
98
From Saichō to the destruction of Tōdaiji 8001180
107
Chronology
110
The beginnings of a Japanese Buddhism Tendai
113
52 SaichS
115
53 The Tiantai tradition
119
54 The Lotus sutra
125
55 The creation of Tendai
129
The beginnings of a Japanese Buddhism Shingon
135
62 Fundamental characteristics of tantric Buddhism
141
63 Kukai returns
146
64 The creation of Shingon
148
65 The Shingon tradition after the death of Kukai
151
Buddhism and the state in Heian Japan
153
72 Tantrism triumphant
162
73 Religious aspects of life at court
168
Shrine and state in Heian Japan
179
82 Cataloguing the native gods
184
83 The Ise and Kamo shrines
191
The rise of devotionalism
196
92 Amitabhas vows
198
93 Early Pure Land Buddhism
200
94 Covenanting for salvation
204
95 Visions of heaven and hell
212
In a time of strife
217
102 Pilgrimages to Kumano
222
103 Japanese monks in Song China
226
104 The spread of tantric modes of thought
229
From the destruction of Todaiji to the fall of GoDaigo 11801330
239
Chronology
242
132 Chan meditation techniques
293
133 Chan after the end of the Tang
295
134 Chan in the thirteenth century
301
Zen Buddhism
304
142 Eihei Dogen
308
143 Official patronage
317
Reform from within and without
321
152 Dancing to salvation
328
153 Worshipping the Lotus
332
The emergence of Shinto
344
162 The mandalisation of Japan
345
163 Watarai Shintd
351
164 New myths of origin
354
165 The literal reading of metaphor
358
Taking stock
363
172 Metropolitan Zen
368
173 Zen in the countryside
371
From the fall of GoDaigo to the death of Nobunaga13301582
377
Chronology
380
Two rival court
381
182 GoDaigos legacy
384
183 Saving the souls of warriors
391
184 The growth of Pure Land congregations
394
185 The Lotus sects
397
Muromachi Zen
400
192 Those below the grove
404
193 Three men of Zen
409
The end of the medieval
419
202 The rise of Honganji
423
203 Playing with fire
426
204 Jesuits
430
Reading Shingons two mandala
436
The Womb World mandala 441
441
References
448
Index
462
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著者について (2005)

Richard Bowring is Professor of Japanese Studies at the University of Cambridge and Master of Selwyn College, Cambridge. He is co-author of The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Japan (1993) and has written a number of Japanese Language textbooks.

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