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A great price, and thereby become enabled jate the actaal worth of bis spiritaalized " When thus divinely taught, we are soon acquainted with the works of John Newton, g the best elementary books for a young I to perase ; and who has ever travelled the history of Newton, without feeling every is heart attuned to sympathy with that sinnument of converting grace ? Olney becomes ndeared, for Newton's sake ; trebly so, for 'hotaas Scott, whose name is likewise conwith it; and the frequent recurrence that mpted to make to the dear little volume of ymns, completes the charm. À titla nata of this work bespeaks a

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@Atlett's SERMONS pages : and there we find the band of Glial love reverently pourtraying the life and labours of u venerable parent, over whom the earth has recently closed, leaving to his bereaved daughter the melatt. choly solace of she wing to us all the value of what she has lost. If any combinatibu of circumstances could utterly disarm the hand of criticiseu, lete is enough to do it: but happily this is not treedtut: from the Christian eritie our amiable biographer lies as little to apprehend, as had her excellent father when he arranged the discourses which forth the bulk of these volumes. There is, in both, tutte le interest and to instruct; and we do not doubt of the work becoming a favorite in Christian Memilie,

THE GARLAND. By Mix, SAwwwand Melhoef

Berwick A COLLECTION, or rather series of pretty wheed me illastrated by pretty engravings, read it hereft Hand dency, as addressed to the understanding that what dren, and very young persons, but marked by the redundancy of imagination which characterone this popular writer. A short, scriptural, pelitile appears at the head of each story, explaining the moral intended to be conveyed by it. Whether the tales have, separately, appeared in print before, we do not know: there is nothing to indicate that they have done so; and here they form a handsome volume, neatly embellished. We must add that the doctrine of Christ's personal reign on earth, during the millennium is frequently brought forward, though not obtrusively; and that on this point, we do not

able, beautiful. We pray our Christian readers to encourage the work, assured that it is calculated widely to disperse over our land, the knowledge of the glory of God, in the face of Jesus Christ. Who would grudge the sum of seventeen shillings in a year, to bring twelve poor families under such teaching as we have described ?

SERMONS: By the late Rev. Henry Gauntlett, Vicar

of Olney, Bucks. With a Memoir of the author.

In two volumes. Seeley and Burnside. Olney is a word fraught with sweet, sacred, and touching recollections, beyond, perhaps, any other in the nomenclature of English parishes, to the minds of the generation. We learn to love it for Cowper's sake, when fascinated by the grace of his poetic pages; it may be, long before we have discovered the Pearl of great price, and thereby become enabled to appreciate the actual worth of bis spiritualized effusions. When thus divinely taught, we are soon brought acquainted with the works of John Newton, as among the best elementary books for a young Christian to peruse; and who has ever travelled through the history of Newton, without feeling every fibre of his heart attuned to sympathy with that singular monument of converting grace ? Olney becomes doubly endeared, for Newton's sake; trebly so, for that of Thomas Scott, whose name is likewise connected with it; and the frequent recurrence that we are tempted to make to the dear little volume of Olney hymns, completes the charm.

So, the very title page of this work bespeaks a tenderness of feeling, as we turn to the subsequent pages ; and there we find the hand of filial love reverently pourtraying the life and labours of a venerable parent, over whom the earth has recently closed, leaving to his bereaved daughter the melancholy solace of shewing to us all the value of what she has lost. If any combination of circumstances could utterly disarm the hand of criticism, here is enough to do it: but happily this is not needful: from the Christian critic our amiable biographer has as little to apprebend, as had her excellent father when he arranged the discourses which form the bulk of these volumes. There is, in both, much to interest and to instruct; and we do not doubt of the work becoming a favorite in Christian families.

THE GARLAND. By Mrs. Sherwood. Melrose,

Berwick.

A collection, or rather series, of pretty stories, illustrated by pretty engravings, good in their tendency, as addressed to the understandings of children, and very young persons, but marked by that redundancy of imagination which characterizes this popular writer. A short, scriptural, preface appears at the head of each story, explaining the moral intended to be conveyed by it. Whether the tales have, separately, appeared in print before, we do not know: there is nothing to indicate that they have done so ; and here they form a handsome volume, neatly embellished. We must add that the doctrine of Christ's personal reign on earth, during the millennium is frequently brought forward, though not obtrusively; and that on this point, we do not agree with the author..

POLITICS.

· HeY DAY!' said my uncle, who had just returned from making a fortnight's tour with Mr. M‘Carthy, and took up the Record of August 20,- What have we got here? Our lady editor rampant in the columns of a newspaper-how fine!'

• Now don't laugh about it, dear uncle, but listen to what I shall tell you.'

· I see,' proceeded the old gentleman, that you have been publishing the documents referred to in our last conversation. This is well-I am rejoiced at it; but how came they to be brought forward here, rather than in the Magazine?'

• Just after you set out, dear uncle, I was surprised at seeing in the Record a letter bearing the signature of the Rev. Mr. Bull of Yorkshire, who is altogether unknown to me, except by name and his highly estimable character. He quoted the statement made by our friend, in regard to the attendance of Protestant children at the celebration of the mass, in schools under the direction of the Irish Board of Education; and referring to the footnote, which alludes to the documents that you know we saw, he called on the Editor to substantiate the fact, hoping it might be made the ground-work of a petition to Parliament.'

* And were you not frightened at being so called out, with unkey at a distance ?."

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