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HOLY SCRIPTURE the only infallible Guide to

Saving Truth. A Sermon, preached at the Parish Church of St. Mary, Islington. By Daniel Wilson, M. A. Vicar, on Sunday, October 4, 1835. Forbes

and Jackson. THE ENGLISH REFORMATION COMMEMO.

RATED, in the Preaching of the Everlasting Gospel, and the finding of the Book in the time of Josiah. Two Sermons preached at the Chapel of Ease, Islington, on Sunday, October 4, 1835. By John Hambleton, M. A. Minister of the said Chapel. Forbes

and Jackson. THE CANDLE OF THE LORD UNCOVERED;

or the Bible rescued from Papal thraldom by the Reformation. A Sermon preached in the Parish Church of St. Mary, Islington, on Sunday, October 4, 1835. By John Norman Pearson, A. M. Evening Lecturer. Forbes and Jackson.

Single Sermons on particular occasions are generally considered rather ephemeral, and soon laid aside; but the recent Centenary commemoration calls for a more abiding notice. We hope that our Christian mothers have provided means for keeping the minds of their children and household awake to this momentous subject. An occasional recurrence to the published discourses of that day would be very advisable : and we are glad to find that Islington has done justice to her proximity to Smithfield ? by contributing to this store. All these sermons are scriptural and appropriate. Mr. Wilson marks the distinction, and commends to his hearers the all

1 The place of burning.

sufficient word of God: Mr. Hambleton grapples with 'popéry more in detail, exhibiting in a strong light the anti-scripturat abominations of its system : and Mr. Pearson seems to have kindled his torch at the flames of the martyrs, in so glowing a strain of holy indigration does he animadvert opon the charac. ter, progress, and design of the “ Man of Sin." His discourse is singularly eloquent and heart-stirring. We perused and re-perused it many times, with increasing delight; while every sentiment found an echo in the inmost depths of our heart.

THE FRIEND OF SINNERS. Edited by John

Cox, Minister of the Gospel, Woolwich, and published for the Benefit of the Maritime Penitent Female Refuge. Edwards, Nisbet, &c.

Our readers will do well to encourage this pretty little book. The institution that it seeks to serve is one calling loudly for the aid of Christian females. In the preface an appalling statement is given of the multitude of wretched wanderers infesting the public walks, for whose souls few seem to care. Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Kent patronizes the institution, and already have two hundred destitute and abandoned creatures been admitted within its walls.

The pocket volume before us consists of short original pieces in prose and verse, chiefly by the Editor, with a few pleasing contributions from Thomas Ragg and others. All, without exception, are spiritual; and the greater number strictly devotional.

FAMILY COMMENTARY UPON THE SERMON

ON THE MOUNT. By the late Henry Thornton, Esq. M. P. Hatchards.

The editor of this valuable exposition expresses his belief that, ! so far as he knows the works of the best divines, no other commentator, on the same portion of scripture, has combined in an equal degree a deep knowledge of the human heart, with an extensive experience of human life; vigorous common sense with high and holy wisdom; Christian love with Christian faithfulness.' We do not dissent from this testimony; but recommend the book as an acquisition to all who love a decided tone in spiritual things, sweetened with much tenderness; and thoroughly practical.

THE YOUNG CHRISTIAN HERO. A Narrative,

shewing how the Gospel shined into the heart of a little boy at school, who eventually died at sea. Written by the Clergyman of his parish. Nisbet.

An interesting little story, shewing the blessed effects resulting from judicious and persevering attention to an unpromising character.

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“There is no withstanding it, dear uncle,' said I with a feeling at once yexed and submissive, must have done with that obnoxious word.'

"Why so ?'

• We are denounced on all hands; by some, for meddling with politics in any way-by others, for so heading a paper which, they say, rarely contains any thing properly reducible under that bead.'

Then you are about to forego all allusion to the events of the day ?'

• Not I, indeed, sir. Among many objectors, I scarcely find three who are agreed as to what it is that they consider objectionable: while, on the other side, I can show a body pretty large and perfectly unanimous, whose word is,-go on.'

Then, may I ask, my capricious niece, what is your present intention ? You deal much in contradictions to-day.'

I think of altering our title ; and so obtaining a wider range of remark. Some, uncle, consider that what relates to the state of religion, and religious parties in Ireland, has nothing to do with politics.'

My uncle smiled.

• Then, dear sir, we are accused of making the Irish question too prominent.'

. You can give it up,' said my uncle, coolly.

• Give it up? never. I'll give up the Magazine first. What! when our grand outpost is stormed, are we to overlook the affair, because it is only an outpost; remaining unconcerned until the enemy's artillery shall thunder within our gates! When an integral part of our holy church is assailed, and our brethren persecuted almost unto the death, are we to affect indifference because the sword has not yet reached our dwellings? Nay: though you are a good and effective ally, even your desertion would not silence me there.'

'I am not going to desert you, my dear child. I fully understand the difficulties of your situation ; and have marked the perplexity consequent on an influx of contending opinions. You wish to do right; but human infirmity renders it no easy matter to discern in what path duty lies. You wish to avoid displeasing any : but a hope more chimerical than that can scarcely be entertained by mortal man. I thought you had fully made up your mind last month on this subject.'

"So I did, uncle ; and it is not materially altered: but I am inclined just to relinquish the word politics, without binding myself to any abstinence from the thing which it signifies.'

• Be it so ; what phrase will you substitute?'

'I have thought of one, the signification of which is little understood, and much undervalued ;-a word, in its proper extent embracing all that you or I would deem worth noticing within the range of sublunary things; and including all that the eye of faith can scan of those invisible. I would individualize that word, uncle: and entitle this portion of our Magazine, The PROTESTANT.'

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