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9. I know not why I have been laughed at by you. 10. Thus have I 2. New Testament, Gospels of St. Luke, St. John, and the persuaded myself, thus do I feel that our minds are not inortal. 11. Acts. Who believes that the citizens will object to peace ? 12. Who is

3. Euripides, “ Phænissæ." always confident that that which is frail and perishing will remain

4. Sophocles, “ Antigone." steadfast and firm? 13. The glory of the Romans has remained till our time. 14, Lycurgus commanded that all citizens should eat in

5. Plato, “ Apologia Socratis.”

6. Lucian, Walker's “ Selections." common. EXERCISE 140.--ENGLISH-LATIN.

7. Xenophon, “Anabasis." Books i., ii., iü. 1. Soleo de amicorum meorum fortuna gaudere. 2. Gavisi sunt.

Latin. 3. Gaudebunt. 4. Sorores meæ gavisæ sunt. 5. Fortuna fortibus 1. Virgil, “ Æneid.” Books i., Ü., iï., vi., vii. hominibus arridet. 6. Putasne fortunam fortibus arrisuram esse ?

2. Horace, “ Odes." 7. Nego fortunam fortibus semper arridere. 8. Deridet philosophum. 9. Cur philosophus a puero deridetur? 10. Non est dubium quin philo.

3. Horace, “Satires" and "Epistles.” sophi a stultissimis derisi sint. 11. Oratores student excitos civium

4. Sallust. animos permulcere. 12. Persuasum est mihi oratores excitos hominum

5. Livy. Books iv., v. animos permulcere debent. 13. Napoleone regnante, tota Europa 6. Terence, “ Phormio " and "Hecyra." bello arsit.

Having "passed” the entrance examination, the student Fable.-The Kid and the Wolf.

becomes a Junior Freshman, and before we proceed to explain A kid, standing on the roof of a house, abused a wolf who was the rest of his course, we will mention the fees which have to be passing by. To whom the wolf said, "Not you, but the roof has paid at entrance by ordinary students. abused me." Place and opportunity often render timid men bold. Each successful candidate must pay £15 within twelve days Fable.--The Crane and the Peacock.

after his examination, in order to have his name placed on the A peacock, spreading out his feathers in the presence of a crane, college books; and his half-year's fees, due on the 22nd of March said, “How great is my beauty and your ugliness !" But the crane, and 22nd of September in each year, until he obtains his B.A. fying forth, said, " And how great is my swiftness and your slow- degree, are £8 8s. These charges include all payments of every ness!" This fable warns us not, on account of any good which Nature kind for non-resident students. Those who reside in college has allotted to us, to despise others, on whom Nature has bestowed have to pay additional fees for their rooms, their commons other advantages, and perhaps greater ones.

(i.e., their dining in the “Common" Hall), and their personal

expenses. THE UNIVERSITIES.-VI.

During his first year in college, a man is designated a Junior

Freshman; during the second, a Senior Freshman during the DUBLIN UNIVERSITY.--I.

third, a Junior Sophister ; during the fourth, a Senior Sophister ; THE University of Dublin differs in two important respects from at the end of which he may pass his degree examination and the sister universities of Oxford and Cambridge. 1st. It con become a B.A. sists of bat one college, "The College of the Holy and Undivided A "year" in university language does not mean a calendar Trinity." 2ndly. Residence is not necessary in order to obtain year, but the period from October 10th to the following 30th of a degree.

June; the remaining portion of the year being the long vacation The one college, however, in Dublin University is much larger The college year consists of three "Terms." Michaelmas Term and wealthier in endowments than any college in the other begins on the 10th of October and ends on the 20th of December universities, having generally about 1,300 students on its books ; Hilary Term begins on the 20th of January and ends on the Feast and the non-requirement of residence enables persons of limited of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin, St. Mary: Trinity means, and who may be engaged in some occupation, to obtain Term begins on the 15th of April and ends on the 30th of June a degree, who might not be able to do so at all if residence were Each of these terms can be" kept” by those who reside in a sine qua non. In our remarks on this univorsity, we propose near college attending the Term Lectures, or by those who first to explain, as simply as possible, the ordinary course re- cannot attend lectures passing the Term Examination, which quired to obtain the B.A. and higher degrees, and then to held in the Examination Hall, and generally lasts two or thre enumerate the various rewards that can be obtained in Trinity days. Having entered and been enrolled as a Junior Freshma College, and the encouragements in the way of prizes which are a student, to rise to the class of Senior Freshman, must ke peculiarly acceptablo to students of moderate means, as either one term at least by examination. affording them an opportunity to pass through college at a reduced rate, or giving them the means to meet the requisite

JUNIOR FRESHMAN CLASS. expenses.

The subjects for the ordinary examinations for the severi The first thing which one seeking for a degree wants to know terms in the Junior Freshman year are as follow : is, how he is to become a member of the college, and therefore we

Hilary Term. commence with an explanation of the mode of "entrance," or “matriculation," as it is technically called. Every candidate Elementary Rules.

Mathematics.- Enclid, Books i., ii., i. ; Arithmetic; Algebr for entrance into Trinity College, Dublin, must pass the "Entrance Examination,” which is usually held in the months

Classics.- The Three Olynthiac Orations of Demosthene of January, April, June, October, and November. The precise

Cicero, " Pro Milone.”

Trinity Term. dates are given each year in the University Calendar, or can be obtained by application to “The Senior Lecturer, Trinity College,

Mathematics.-Euclid, Books i., ü., iü., vi., and Definitions Dublin.”. Before “entering," each candidate has to select some Book v. (omitting Propositions 27, 28, and 29 of Book vi one of the college tutors (who are always fellows) to be his Arithmetic, as before ; Algebra, to the end of Quadratic Ega tutor; not that he is in any ordinary sense to receive tuition

tions. from him, but the college tutor is the medium of communication

Classics.- The “Medea " of Euripides; Books ü. and is between the student and the board during his college course,

the " Odes” of Horace. and is ready at all times to obtain information for and advise

Michaelmas Term. his pupils. There is no payment to the tutor further than what is included in the ordinary college fees, to which we shall pre- Trigonometry, to end of solution of Plane Triangles.

Mathematics.—Euclid, Arithmetic, and Algebra, as befor sently refer.

Classics.--Book viii. of Herodotos, and Book xxi. of Liry. Having resolved to enter, and selected and been accepted by Having kept one of the above terms by passing the exams a particular tutor, the candidate presents himself for entrance, tion, the student will become a Senior Freshman. The stade and is examined in the following course :-Latin and English can always ascertain from the calendar, or from his tutor, Composition, Arithmetic, English History, Modern Geography, dates fixed for the Term Examination. Algebra (the first four rules and fractions), and any two Greek To rise to the class of Junior Sophister, the student must and two Latin books of their own choice from the following the “General Examination of Senior Freshmen," held at list:

commencement of Michaelmas Term. Before, however, he Greek.

be allowed to go up for this examination, he must hare b er, “Iliad.” Books V., vi., vii.

three terms as a Freshman : one of these (as already pointed s

fre chapters.

must be by passing a Term Examination in his Junior Freshman Trinity Lectures, and Michaelmas Examination. year; one must be in the Senior Freshman year, either by pass- Classics. — Æschylus, "Prometheus Vinctus;" Horace, ing the Term Examination or attending the Term Lectures; and “Satires.” the third may be in either year, kept either by lectures or Physics.—Mechanics, same as before ; Hydrostatics, Galbraith examination. The lectures delivered during one term are on the and Haughton's "Manual;" Lloyd's "Optics." subjects which form the examination of the following term. We Astronomy.--Same as before. snbjoin here a list of the subjects of examination for each term Logic, Locke, and Cousin.-Same as before. in the Senior Freshman year, including the Michaelmas Exami- Those Junior Sophisters who desire to do so may present ration, which must be passed by all students to rise from the themselves for examination in the following course of ExperiSenior Freshman to the Sophister Class, and which is commonly mental Physics, instead of the classical course given above :called the "little go" examination, as distinct from the final degree examination at the end of the Senior Sophister year,

Hilary. which is known as the “great go.”

Heat.--1. Dilatation of Solids, Liquids, and Gases. 2. Specific

and Latent Heat. 3. Radiation and Conduction of Heat.
SENIOR FRESHMAN CLASS.
Hilary Term.

Trinity.
Wathematics.-Same as in Junior Freshman Michaelmas Electricity.-Frictional and Voltaic Electricity.
Examination.

Heat.-As before.
Logic.--Walker's edition of "Murray."

Michaelmas.
Classics.- Plato's “ Apologia Socratis," and "The Orations of Heat.-As before.
Cicero against Catiline."

Electricity.-As before.
Trinity Term.

Magnetism.
Mathematics,-Same as before.

In the Senior Sophister year there is allowed to the student Logic. --Same as before. Locke's " Essay," Introduction a choice of any two of the first three courses in the following and Books ü. and iii. (omitting, in Book ü., sec. 10—20 of list of subjects for each examination. In every case the last ekap. i.; sec. 10 to end of chap. xiii.; chap. xv.; sec. 11–71 of two subjects (Ethics and Astronomy) are compulsory on all chap. xxi.; chap. XIX. and xxxi.; and chap. vi. of Book iii.). students :Classics.--Homer, Iliad," Book Exiv.; Virgil, “Æneid,”

Hilary Examination.
Books it, and v.
Michaelmas Examination.

Classics.--Aristotle, “Nicomachean Ethics,” Book ii. ; Cicero, Mathematics.-Same as before.

“De Officiis," Book i.

Mathematical Physics.-Mechanics, Hydrostatics, and Optics, Logic.-Logic and Locke as before, with Fourth Book of

as in the Junior Sophister year. Locke ; M. Cousin's " Psychology" (Henry's translation), first

Experimental Physics.-Same as in Junior Sophister year,

and Apjohn's "Manual of the Metalloids." Classics. - Thucydides, Book ii.; Tacitus, “ Germany" and Agricola."

Astronomy.-Same as in Junior Sophister year. In addition to the examinations already explained, all students

Ethics.-Stewart's “Outlines of Moral Philosophy." (except Roman Catholics and Dissenters) must pass four Cate

Trinity Examination. sietical Examinations, one of which must be in the Junior Classics.-Plato, “De Republicâ," Part i.; Horace, " Art of Freshman year, and two in the Senior Freshman year. The Poetry" and "Epistles.” Catechetical Examinations are held each term immediately after Mathematical Physics.-Same as before. ordinary Term Examinations, in the following subjects :- Experimental Physics.-Same as before, and “The Metals" in JUNIOR FRESHMEN.

Gregory's “Inorganic Chemistry." Hilary Term.-The Gospel according to St. Luke.

Astronomy and Ethics.--Same as before.
Trinity Term.-The Acts of the Apostles.

Michaelmas Examination.
Michaelmas Term.--Archbishop Secker's “Lectures on the
Cesed " (Lectures on the Church Catechism, vi. to xvii. incl.).

Classics.-Books i. and ii. of Aristotle's “ Politics;" Book i.

of the " Annals" of Tacitus. SENIOR FRESHMEN.

Mathematical Physics and Experimental Physics.—The same Huary Term.-Genesis, and the first twenty chapters of as before.

Astronomy and Ethics. The same as before, and Part i. of Trinity Term.—Joshua, Judges, Ruth, the two Books of Archdeacon Paley's “ Evidences." Samuel, and the two Books of Kings.

At all the examinations in the Undergraduate Course pieces Michaelmas Term. -The Messianic Prophecies of Isaiah, of English are given the students to be translated into Latin Jersmiah, Daniel, Micah, Zechariah, and Malachi.

prose. Before being allowed to present himself for his B.A. examination

, which is held in the Michaelmas Term of the Senior Sophister year, the student must have kept one term by examina

LESSONS IN ALGEBRA,-XVI. han in his Junior Sophister year, and one term (either by exami

SIMPLE EQUATIONS (continued). ation or lectares) in his Senior

Sophister year, and one in either Senior or Junior Sophister year" (either by examination or

NUMERICAL SUBSTITUTION.

170. In the reduction of an equation, as well as in other parts The subjects for examination during the Junior Sophister simple, by using letters for the given numbers, and also by

of algebra, a complicated process can often be rendered more Michaelmas Lectures, and Hilary Examination.

introducing a new letter which shall be made to represent a

whole algebraic expression. This process is called SUBSTITUTION, Classics. — Sophocles, “Edipus Tyrannus ;” Terence, After the algebraic operation is completed, the numbers, or the

compound quantity for which a single letter has been substituted, Physics — Mechanics, Galbraith and Haughton's “Manual.” Lapic , Locke, and Cousin. The same

as in Senior
Freshnen must be restored, in order to obtain the numerical values

3
EXAMPLE.-
Reduce + = 1.

750 375
Hilary Lectures, and Trinity Examination.
Classics. - Demosthenes, "De Coronâ ;" Juvenal, “Satires,”

Here, by substituting a for 750, 6 for 3, and c for 375, the viñ., I., xiii.

b

equation becomes + =1. Now, clearing of fractions, we Physics. - Mechanics, same as before. Astronomy.-Brinkley's “Astronomy," chaps, i. to viii. in. have cx + ab=ac; and a=a – On restoring the numbers, busive, and xiv., xvi., and xviii.

we have =750

3 x 750

744. Ans. Logic, Locke, and Cousin.-Same as before.

375

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9. I know not why I have been laughed at by you. 10. Thus have I 2. New Testament, Gospels of St. Luke, St. John, and the persuaded myself, thus do I feel that our minds are not mortal. 11. Acts. Who believes that the citizens will object to peace? 12. Who is 3. Euripides, “ Phænissæ." always confident that that which is frail and perishing will remain

4. Sophocles, “Antigone.” steadfast and firm? 13. The glory of the Romans has remained till our time. 14, Lycurgus commanded that all citizens should eat in

5. Plato, “ Apologia Socratis." common.

6. Lucian, Walker's “ Selections." EXERCISE 140.-ENGLISH-LATIN.

7. Xenophon, “Anabasis.” Books i., ii., iü. 1. Soleo de amicorum meorum fortuna gaudere. 2. Gavisi. sunt.

Latin. 3. Gaudebunt. 4. Sorores meæ gavisæ sunt. 5. Fortuna fortibus

1. Virgil, " Æneid." Books i., ü., iii., vi., vii. hominibus arridet. 6. Putasne fortunam fortibus arrisuram esse ?

2. Horace, “ Odes." 7. Nego fortunam fortibus semper arridere. 8. Deridet philosophum.

3. Horace, “Satires" and "Epistles.” 9. Cur philosophus a puero deridetur? 10. Non est dubium quin philo

4. Sallust. sophi a stultissimis derisi sint. 11. Oratores student excitos civium animos permulcere. 12. Persuasum est mihi oratores excitos hominum

5. Livy. Books iv., v. animos permulcere debent. 13. Napoleone regnante, tota Europa 6. Terence, “ Phormio” and “Hecyra." bello arsit.

Having "passed" the entrance examination, the student Fable.-The Kid and the Wolf.

becomes a Junior Freshman, and before we proceed to explain A kid, standing on the roof of a house, abused a wolf who was the rest of his course, we will mention the fees which have to be passing by. To whom the wolf said, "Not you, but the roof has paid at entrance by ordinary students. abused me." Place and opportunity often render timid men bold.

Each successful candidate must pay £15 within twelve days Fable.- The Crane and the Peacock.

after his examination, in order to have his name placed on the A peacock, spreading out his feathers in the presence of a crane, college books; and his half-year's fees, due on the 22nd of March said, “ How great is my beauty and your ugliness!" But the crane, and 22nd of September in each year, until he obtains his B.A. Aying forth, said, “And how great is my swiftness and your slow degree, are £8 8s. These charges include all payments of every ness!" This fable warns us not, on account of any good which Nature kind for non-resident students. Those who reside in college has allotted to us, to despise others, on whom Nature has bestowed have to pay additional fees for their rooms, their commons other advantages, and perhaps greater ones.

(i.e., their dining in the “Common " Hall), and their personal

expenses. THE UNIVERSITIES.-VI.

During his first year in college, a man is designated a Junior DUBLIN UNIVERSITY.-I.

Freshman; during the second, a Senior Freshman during the

third, a Junior Sophister ; during the fourth, a Senior Sophister THE University of Dublin differs in two important respects from at the end of which he may pass his degree examination and the sister universities of Oxford and Cambridge. 1st. It con- become a B.A. sists of bat one college, " The College of the Holy and Undivided A "year" in university language does not mean a calendar Trinity." 2ndly. Residence is not necessary in order to obtain year, but the period from October 10th to the following 30th a degree.

June; the remaining portion of the year being the long vacation The one college, however, in Dublin University is much larger The college year consists of three “Terms." Michaelmas Ter and wealthier in endowments than any college in the other begins on the 10th of October and ends on the 20th of December universities, having generally about 1,300 students on its books; Hilary Term begins on the 20th of January and ends on the Feas and the non-requirement of residence enables persons of limited of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin, St. Mary; Trinit means, and who may be engaged in some occupation, to obtain Term begins on the 15th of April and ends on the 30th of Jan a degree, who might not be able to do so at all if residence were Each of these terms can be “ kept" by those who reside in a sine qua non. In our remarks on this university, we propose near college attending the Term Lectures, or by those first to explain, as simply as possible, the ordinary course re- cannot attend lectures passing the Term Examination, which quired to obtain the B.A. and higher degrees, and then to held in the Examination Hall, and generally lasts two or thr enumerate the various rewards that can be obtained in Trinity days. Having entered and been enrolled as a Junior Freshma College, and the encouragements in the way of prizes which are a student, to rise to the class of Senior Freshman, must key peculiarly acceptable to students of moderate means, as either one term at least by examination. affording them an opportunity to pass through college at a reduced rate, or giving them the means to meet the requisite

JUNIOR FRESHMAN CLASS. expenses.

The subjects for the ordinary examinations for the sever The first thing which one seeking for a degree wants to know terms in the Junior Freshman year are as follow :is, how he is to become a member of the college, and therefore we

Hilary Term. commence with an explanation of the mode of "entrance," or “ matriculation," as it is technically called. Every candidate Elementary Rules.

Mathematics.—Euclid, Books i., ii., iii. ; Arithmetic ; Algebi for entrance into Trinity College, Dublin, must pass the “Entrance Examination,” which is usually held in the months

Classics. --The Three Olynthiao Orations of Demosthene

Cicero, “ Pro Milone." of January, April, June, October, and November. The precise dates are given each year in the University Calendar, or can be

Trinity Term. obtained by application to “ The Senior Lecturer, Trinity College,

Mathematics.--Enclid, Books i., ii., iii., vi., and Definitions Dublin.”. Before “entering," each candidate has to select some Book v. (omitting Propositions 27, 28, and 29 of Book one of the college tutors (who are always fellows) to be his Arithmetic, as before ; Algebra, to the end of Quadratic Eq tutor; not that he is in any ordinary sense to receive tuition tions. from him, but the college tutor is the medium of communication

Classics.- The “Medea" of Euripides ; Books iii. and between the student and the board during his college course,

the "Odes" of Horace. and is ready at all times to obtain information for and advise

Michaelmas Term. his pupils. There is no payment to the tutor further than what Mathematics.-Euclid, Arithmetic, and Algebra, so bela is included in the ordinary college fees, to which we shall pre- Trigonometry, to end of solution of Plane Triangles. sently refer.

Classics.--Book yüi. of Herodotas, and Book xxi. of Livy. Having resolved to enter, and selected and been accepted by

Having kept one of the above terms by passing the exsmit a particular tutor, the candidate presents himself for entrance, tion, the student will become a Senior Freshman. The studs and is examined in the following course :---Latin and English can always ascertain from the calendar, or from his tutor, Composition, Arithmetic, English History, Modern Geography, dates fixed for the Term Examination. Algebra (the first four rules and fractions), and any two Greek To rise to the class of Junior Sophister, the student must and two Latin books of their own choice from the following the “General Examination of Senior Freshmen," held at list:

commencement of Michaelmas Term. Before, however, he Greek.

be allowed to go up for this examination, he must have 1, Homer, “Iliad.” Books V., vi., vii,

three terms as a Freshman : one of these (as already pointed 3 must be by passing a Term Examination in his Junior Freshman Trinity Lectures, and Michaelmas Examination. year; one must be in the Senior Freshman year, either by pass- Classics. Æschylus, “Prometheus Vinctus;" Horace, ing the Term Examination or attending the Term Lectures; and “ Satires." the third may be in either year, kept either by lectures or Physics.—Mechanics, same as before ; Hydrostatics, Galbraith eramination. The lectures delivered during one term are on the and Haughton's “Manual ;" Lloyd's “ Optics." subjects which form the examination of the following term. We Astronomy.--Same as before. sabjoin here a list of the subjects of examination for each term Logic, Locke, and Cousin.-Same as before. in the Senior Freshman year, including the Michaelmas Exami. Those Junior Sophisters who desire to do so may present nation, which must be passed by all students to rise from the themselves for examination in the following course of ExperiSenior Freshman to the Sophister Class, and which is commonly mental Physics, instead of the classical course given above :called the "little go" examination, as distinct from the final degree examination at the end of the Senior Sophister year,

Hilary. which is known as the "great go."

Heat.–1. Dilatation of Solids, Liquids, and Gases. 2. Specific SENIOR FRESHMAN CLASS.

and Latent Heat. 3. Radiation and Conduction of Heat. Hilary Term.

Trinity.
Mathematics.-Same as in Junior Freshman Michaelmas Electricity.-Frictional and Voltaic Electricity.
Examination.

Heat.-As before.
Logic. - Walker's edition of "Murray."

Michaelmas.
Classics - Plato's “ Apologia Socratis," and “The Orations of Heat.--As before.
Cicero against Catiline."

Electricity.--As before.
Trinity Term.

Magnetism.
Mathematics,-Same as before.

In the Senior Sophister year there is allowed to the student Logic.--Same as before. Locko's " Essay," Introduction

a choice of any two of the first three courses in the following and Books üi. and iï. (omitting, in Book ü., sec. 10–20 of list of subjects for each examination. In every case the last chap. i.; sec. 10 to end of chap. xii.; chap. xv.; sec. 11–71 of two subjects (Ethics and Astronomy) are compulsory on all shap. xxi.; chap. XI. and xxxi.; and chap. vi. of Book iii.).

students :Classics.-Homer, “Iliad,” Book xxiv.; Virgil, “ Æneid,"

Hilary Examination.
Books ir, and v.
Michaelmas Examination.

Classics.--Aristotle, “Nicomachean Ethics," Book ii. ; Cicero, Mathematics.-Same as before.

“De Officiis," Book i. Lopic.—Logic and Locke as before, with Fourth Book of as in the Junior Sophister year.

Mathematical Physics.--Mechanics, Hydrostatics, and Optics, Locke ; M. Cousin's “Psychology" (Henry's translation), first Era chapters.

Experimental Physics.--Same as in Junior Sophister year,

and Apjohn's "Manual of the Metalloids." Classics.-Thucydides, Book ii.; Tacitus, "Germany" and "Agricola."

Astronomy.--Same as in Junior Sophister year. In addition to the examinations already explained, all students

Ethics.-Stewart's “Outlines of Moral Philosophy.” (ercept Roman Catholics and Dissenters) must pass four Cate

Trinity Examination. Aletical Examinations, one of which must be in the Junior Classics.--Plato, “De Republica," Part i. ; Horace, “ Art of Frehman year, and two in the Senior Freshman year. The Poetry" and "Epistles.” Catechetical Examinations are held each term immediately after Mathematical Physics.Same as before. Le ordinary Term Examinations, in the following subjects :- Experimental Physics.-Same as before, and “The Metals" in JUNIOR FRESHMEN.

Gregory's “ Inorganic Chemistry.” Hilary Term.-The Gospel according to St. Luke.

Astronomy and Ethics.-Same as before. Trinity Term.-The Acts of the Apostles.

Michaelmas Examination. Michaelmas Term.--Archbishop Secker's “ Lectures on the keed" (Lectures on the Church Catechism, vi. to xvii. incl.).

Classics.-Books i. and ii. of Aristotle's “Politics;" Book i.

of the "Annals" of Tacitus. SENIOR FRESHMEN.

Mathematical Physics and Experimental Physics.—The same Hilary Term.-Genesis, and the first twenty chapters of as before.

Astronomy and Ethics.—The same as before, and Part i. of Trinity Term.—Joshua, Judges, Ruth, the two Books of Archdeacon Paley's “Evidences." mael, and the two Books of Kings.

At all the examinations in the Undergraduate Course pieces Michaelmas Term. -The Messianic Prophecies of Isaiah, of English are given the students to be translated into Latin Esmiah, Daniel, Micah, Zechariah, and Malachi.

prose. Before being allowed to present himself for his B.A. examina, which is held in the Michaelmas Term of the Senior phister year, the student must have kept one term by examina

LESSONS IN ALGEBRA.-XVI. in his Junior Sophister year, and one term (either by exami

SIMPLE EQUATIONS (continued). son or lectures) in his Senior Sophister year, and one in either sior or Junior Sophister year (either by examination or

NUMERICAL SUBSTITUTION.

170. In the reduction of an equation, as well as in other parts The subjects for examination during the Junior Sophister of algebra, a complicated process can often de rendered more

simple, by using letters for the given numbers, and also by Michaelmas Lectures, and Hilary Examination.

introducing a new letter which shall be made to represent a

whole algebraic expression. This process is called SUBSTITUTION. Classics. — Sophocles, “Edipus Tyrannus ;” Terence, After the algebraic operation is completed, the numbers, or the

compound quantity for which a single letter has been substituted, Physics. - Mechanics, Galbraith and Haughton's “Manual.”

must be restored, in order to obtain the numerical value. Logic , Locke, and Cousin.-The same as in Senior Freshman

3 EXAMPLE.-Reduce

+ = 1.

750 375 Hilary Lectures, and Trinity Exantination. Classics.-Demosthenes, “ De Coronâ ;" Juvenal, “Satires,"

Here, by substituting a for 750, b for 3, and c for 375, the

b Tä., X., xiii.

equation becomes + =1. Now, clearing of fractions, we Physics. - Mechanics, same as before.

ab Astronomy.-- Brinkley's "Astronomy," chaps, i. to viii. in- have cx + ab=ac; and x = a -4.5 On restoring the numbers, sive, and ziv., xvi., and xviii.

3 x 750 we have r=750

= 744. Ans. Lovíc, Locke, and Cousin.-Same as before.

375

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Adelphi."

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9. I know not why I have been laughed at by you. 10. Thus have I 2. New Testament, Gospels of St. Luke, St. John, and the persuaded myself, thus do I feel that our minds are not mortal. 11. Acts. Who believes that the citizens will object to peace ? 12. Who is

3. Euripides, “ Phønissæ." always confident that that which is frail and perishing will remain

4. Sophocles, "Antigone." steadfast and firm? 13. The glory of the Romans has remained till

5. Plato, “ Apologia Socratis." our time. 14. Lycurgus commanded that all citizens should eat in

6. Lucian, Walker's "Selections." common, EXERCISE 140.-ENGLISH-LATIN.

7. Xenophon, "Anabasis." Books i., ii., iü. 1. Soleo de annicorum meorum fortuna gaudere. 2. Gavisi sunt.

Latin. 3. Gaudebant. 4. Sorores meæ gavisæ sunt. 5. Fortuna fortibus

1. Virgil, “ Æneid.” Books i., ii., iii., vi., vii. hominibus arridet. 6. Putasne fortunam fortibus arrisuram esse ?

2. Horace, “ Odes." 7. Nego fortunam fortibus semper arridere. 8. Deridet philosophum.

3. Horace, " Satires" and "Epistles.” 9. Cur philosophus a puero deridetur? 10. Non est dubium quin philosophi a staltissimis derisi sint.

4. Sallust. 11. Oratores student excitos civium animos permulcere. 12. Persuasum est mihi oratores excitos hominum 5. Livy. Books iv., v. animos permulcere debent. 13. Napoleone regnante, tota Europa

6. Terence, “Phormio" and "Hecyra." bello arsit.

Having "passed” the entrance examination, the stadent Fable.The Kid and the Wolf.

becomes a Junior Freshman, and before we proceed to explain A kid, standing on the roof of a house, abused a wolf who was the rest of his course, we will mention the fees which have to be passing by. To whom the wolf said, "Not you, but the roof has paid at entrance by ordinary students. abused me." Place and opportunity often render timid men bold.

Each successful candidate must pay £15 within twelve days Fable.- The Crane and the Peacock.

after his examination, in order to have his name placed on the A peacock, spreading out his feathers in the presence of a crane, college books; and his half-year's fees, due on the 22nd of March said, “How great is my beauty and your ugliness!" But the crane, and 22nd of September in each year, until he obtains his B.A. flying forth, said, “ And how great is my swiftness and your slow- degree, are £8 8s. These charges include all payments of every ness !” This fable warns us not, on account of any good which Nature kind for non-resident students. Those who reside in college has allotted to us, to despise others, on whom Nature has bestowed have to pay additional fees for their rooms, their commons other advantages, and perhaps greater ones.

(i.e., their dining in the “Common” Hall), and their personal

expenses. THE UNIVERSITIES.-VI.

During his first year in college, a man is designated a Junior

Freshman; during the second, a Senior Freshman during the DUBLIN UNIVERSITY.-I.

third, a Junior Sophister ; during the fourth, a Senior Sophister; THE University of Dublin differs in two important respects from at the end of which he may pass his degree examination and the sister universities of Oxford and Cambridge. 1st. It con- become a B.A. sists of but one college, " The College of the Holy and Undivided A "year" in university language does not mean a calendar Trinity.” 2ndly. Residence is not necessary in order to obtain year, but the period from October 10th to the following 30th of a degree.

June; the remaining portion of the year being the long vacation The one college, however, in Dublin University is much larger The college year consists of three "Terms." Michaelmas Tera and wealthier in endowments than any college in the other begins on the 10th of October and ends on the 20th of Decemba universities, having generally about 1,300 students on its books; Hilary Term begins on the 20th of January and ends on the Fear and the non-requirement of residence enables persons of limited of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin, St. Mary; Trinit means, and who may be engaged in some occupation, to obtain Term begins on the 15th of April and ends on the 30th of Jam a degree, who might not be able to do so at all if residence were Each of these terms can be kept” by those who reside ind a sine quâ non. In our remarks on this univorsity, we propose near college attending the Term Lectures, or by those wi first to explain, as simply as possible, the ordinary course re- cannot attend lectures passing the Term Examination, which quired to obtain the B.Ă. and higher degrees, and then to held in the Examination Hall, and generally lasts two or thre enumerate the various rewards that can be obtained in Trinity days. Having entered and been enrolled as a Junior Freshma College, and the encouragements in the way of prizes which are a student, to rise to the class of Senior Freshman, must ka peculiarly acceptable to students of moderate means, as either one term at least by examination. affording them an opportunity to pass through college at a

JUNIOR FRESHMAN CLASS. reduced rate, or giving them the means to meet the requisite expenses.

The subjects for the ordinary examinations for the seret The first thing which one seeking for a degree wants to know terms in the Junior Freshman year are as follow :is, how he is to become a member of the college, and therefore we

Hilary Teror.. commence with an explanation of the mode of "entrance," or "matriculation," as it is technically called. Every candidate Elementary Rules.

Mathematics.—Euclid, Books i., ii., iii. ; Arithmetic; Algebi for entrance into Trinity College, Dublin, must pass the “Entrance Examination,” which is usually held in the months Cicero, “ Pro Milone."

Classics.-- The Three Olynthiuc Orations of Demosthene of January, April, June, October, and November. The precise dates are given each year in the University Calendar, or can be

Trinity Term. obtained by application to “ The Senior Lecturer, Trinity College, Book v. (omitting Propositions 27, 28, and 29 of Book

Mathematics.—Euclid, Books i., ü., üi., vi., and Definitione Dublin." Before "entering,” each candidate has to select some one of the college tutors (who are always fellows) to be his Arithmetic, as before ; Algebra, to the end of Quadratio Eqttutor; not that he is in any ordinary sense to receive tuition

tions. from him, but the college tutor is the medium of communication

Classics. The “Medea " of Euripides ; Books üü. and is between the student and the board during his college course, the “Odes” of Horace. and is ready at all times to obtain information for and advise

Michaelmas Term. his pupils. There is no payment to the tutor further than what Mathematics.-Euclid, Arithmetic, and Algebra, as belor is included in the ordinary college fees, to which we shall pre- Trigonometry, to end of solution of Plane Triangles. sently refer.

Classics.-Book viji. of Herodotas, and Book xi. of Lavy. Having resolved to enter, and selected and been accepted by

Having kept one of the above terms by passing the exsmit a particular tutor, the candidate presents himself for entrance, tion, the student will become a Senior Freshman. The stude and is examined in the following course :-Latin and English can always ascertain from the calendar, or from his tutor, Composition, Arithmetic, English History, Modern Geography, dates fixed for the Term Examination. Algebra (the first four rules and fractions), and any two Greek To rise to the class of Junior Sophister, the student must po and two Latin books of their own choice from the following the “General Examination of Senior Freshmen," held at & list:

commencement of Michaelmas Term. Before, however, he Greek.

be allowed to go up for this examination, he must have ke 1. Homer, “Iliad.” Books V., vi., vii.

three terms as a Freshman : one of these (as already pointed

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