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The united bands playing " God save the lute of artillery, and amidst the acclamations King,” Mr. Harris and Mr. Kemble having of the multitude. After the ceremony Mr. paid tbeir respects to his Royal Highness, ush- Harris received a letter from Colonel M.Maered him to the marquee. Mr. Smirke, the hon, stating he had it in command from his architect, now presented a plan of the build- Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, to exing to his Royal Highness, who, attended by press to the proprietors and the architect his all the grand masonic officers, then proceeded very high approbation of the extreme order to the ceremonial. On a signal given the and regularity with which the arrangement stone was raised several feet, his Royal High- of the whole ceremonial had been formed and ness advanced to the north-east corner of it, conducted. and deposited in a space cut in the basement, About two o'clock in the morning of Sa. a brass box, containing the British coins of turday, the 21st of January, a fire was discothe year, and a bronze medal bearing a like- vered in St. James's Palace, near the King's ness of the Prince with this inscription on the back stairs. An alarm was instantly given, reverse :

but it was several hours before water could be Georgius

procured for the engines kept in the palace Princeps Walliarum

and those belonging to the various Insurance Theatri

offices which had hastened to the spot. The Regiis instaurandi, Auspiciis, flamęs during this interval had made considerIn Hortis Benedictinis

able progress, and they were not subdued Londini

till they had consumed the whole of the priSua Manu Locavit

vate apartinents of the Queen, those of the M.DCCC. VIII

Duke of Cambridge, the King's Court, and Another medal, also accompanied the above, the apartments of several persons belonging engraved by Gragory, with the following in- to the royal household, who will severely scription:

feel the loss they have suffered. The Dutch Under the auspices of

chapel nearly under the Armoury-Room "has his most sacred majesty George III. sustained considerable injury; the most valu. king of the united kingdons of Great Britain able part of the property in such of the royal and Ireland,

apartments as are destroyed, has been preserthe foundation stone of the Theatre, Covent ved; but unfortunately a young woman,' ser. Garden

vant to Miss Rice, one of the assistant dress was laid by his Royal Highness sers to her Majesty', perished in the confiaGeorge Prince of Wales,

gration. M.DCCC. VIII.

The General Bill of all the Christenings On the reverse of this medal is inscribed :- and Burials within the Bills of Mortality, Robert Smirke, Architect.

from December 15, 1807, to December 13, Six hod-men now conveyed the necessary 1808, is as follows: Christened in the nine. quantity of cementing mortar, which was ty-seven parishes within the walls 1088; spread on the base stone by the same number buried 1372.-Christened in the seventeen of workmen. His Royal Highness then, as parishes wichout the walls 4503; buried grand-master, finished the adjustment of the 3969.-Christened in the twenty-three out. anoriar with a silver trowel presented to him parishes in Middlesex and Surrey 10,10.5; by Earl Moira; the stone was then lowered buried 9737.-Christened in the ten parishes to its destined position, all the bands playing in the city and liberties of Westminster of Rule Britannia,” and the people applauding 4210; buried 4876. wi'h the most animating cheers. The Prince then tried the work by the plumb, tbe level,

j Males... 10,189
Christened
Females.. 9,717 }

19,906. and the square, which were presented to him

Buried

S Males....10,228 hy the proper masonic officers, and then finish

Females .. 9,726 S

19,954. ed laying the stone by three strokes of his Whereof have died mallet; three silver cups were then succes

Under two years of age. 6,075 sively presented to him, containing the an. Between two and five 2,466 cient offerings of corn, wine, and oil, which Five and ten.

847 he poured over the stone with impressive so- Ten and twenty

643 lemnity. His Royal Highness then restored Twenty and thirty

1,200 the plan of the building into the hands of Thirty and forty

1,792 the architect, desiring him to complete the Forty and fifty

1,971 structure conformably thereto; and addressing Fitty and sixty

1,690 Mr. Harris and Mr. Kemble, wished prošpe- Sixty and seventy.

1,499 rity to the building and the national objects Seventy and eighty

1,200 connected with it. Thus closed the ceremo. Eighty and ninety.

504 ny, and his Royal Highness, who performed Ninety and a hundred

65 his part with dignity, and whose manners A hundred during the whole time were highly captiva

A hundred and (wo ting, retired to his carriage under another sa- Increased in the burials this year 1,630.

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DIED. tity of strong beer brewed by the first twelve At his house, near London Bridge, in his houses in London, from the 5th July, 1808, 69th year, Francis Garratt, esq. an eminent to the 5th January, 1809:-

tea dealer. A gentleman whuse upright and Barrels.

Barrels, conscientious conduct as a tradesman had Barclay 64,361 Combe 25,439 gained him the respect of all his mercantile Browa & Parry 48,196 Taylor 18,095 and commercial correspondents, and whose Hanbury.... 41,554 Goodwyn .. 15,678 pleasing inoffensive manners had obtained Whitbread 40,719 J. Calvert .. 14,881 the esteem of, and commanded general

39,292 | Elliott 14,877 admiration from, an extensive circle of friends F. Calvert 32,698 Clowes 14,693 and acquaintance. MARKIED.

in Brook-street, Grosvenor-square, William
At St. Andrew's, Holborn, George Wigley Bond, esq. second son of Sir James B. bart.
Perrott, esq. of Craycombe House, in the 21.
county of Worcester, and captain in the At Dulwich, Miss Suft, daughter of R. F.
sd dragoons, to Miss Yates, only daughter of S. esq. of Lambeth Terrace
Joseph Y. esq. of Peel Hall, in the county of In Tudor.street, Mr. Joseph Cobb, second
Lancaster, and grand-daughter of the late son of T.C. esq. banker, of Lombard-street.
Hon. Mr. Justice Yates.

In Cornhill, Josiab Barnard, esq. banker.
At St. George's, Hanover-square, Francis At Mr. Watkins's, Charing.cross, Miss
Hare Naylor, esq. of Welbeck-street, to Ma. Sophia Walker, late of Stalford, 14.
sia Mealey, widow of Lieutenant colonel At Deptford, Miss Mary Anne Milne,
Ridgway M. late of the Madras establish: daughter of the Rev. Dr. M.

In Westminster-bridge-road, Mrs. Mnry
At Twickenham, Major Charles Ward Anne Cook, wife of Mr. Mr. James C. surgeon,
Orde, of the 9th light dragoons, to Miss In Blandford-street, Robert Coning bam, esq.
Browne.

late of Londonderry.
At Lambeth, C. H. Wohrnian, esq. of At Clapham, Mrs. A. Walde..
Riga, to Miss E. Scongall, eldest daughter of In Fetter-lane, Mr. 7. D. Browne, attor.
George S. esq.

ney.
At St. James's, Robert Townsend Far. In Little College street, Mr. M Daniel.
quhar, second son of Sir Walter F. to Maria, At Camden-town, Mr. T. Austin, of Castle.
youngest daughter of the late Francis Lau. Street, Leicester-square.

In Prince's-street, Bank of England, Ralph At Mary-le-bonne Church, Henry Drury, Johnson Wall, esy. esq. fellow of King's College, Cambridge, to In Grosvenor-place, the Hon. Henry Percy, Caroline, second daughter of A. W. Taylor, son of Lord Lovaine. esq. of Burham House, Herts.

In Queen. Anne street, West, William At Waltham Abbey, Mr. John Whitehead, Blauw, esq. 61. of Dalton, Yorkshire, tu Miss Esther Wala At his son-in law's, Gloucester-terrace, ton, eldest daugbter of William W. esq. of William Phillips, esg. of Chase green, EnEpping Forest.

field. At Chiswick, the Rev. Henry Hunter, of In Surry-place, Kent-road, Joseph Lindley, Hammersmith, to Miss Graham, of Turn. esq.

At Battersea Rise, Mary Sopbia, wife of At Wanstead House, his serene Highness T. Eardon, esq. the Prince of Condé, to her serene Highness In King-street, Cheapside, G. Slack, esq. the Princess Dowager of Moraco.

71. At St. George's, Queen-square, Samuel In Camberwell grove, Mrs. Agrey, 77. Welchman, esq. of Stamford street, to Char- In Sloane-street, Patrick Home, esq. of lotte, daughter of the late Edward Gordon, Wedderburne, in the county of Berwick, for Esg. of Bromley, Middlesex.

which he was many years a representative in Captain M.Ltoi, of the royal navy, to parliament. Miss Bennert, of Half Moon street, Picca. At Osborne's Hotel, Lient. William Skelton, dilly.

of the royal navy, 27. He was the chird son at St. Saviour's, Southwark, the Rev. of the late Arnoldus Jones Skelton, esq. of W. Harrison, chaplain of that parish, to Papcastle, in the county of Cumberland, and Miss Hont, of Walcot place, Lambeth. first cousin to the present Marquis Corn

By special license, at che house of the Earl wallis. of Kenmare, in Seymour-street, Portman- At Long-acre Chapel, during divine service, square, Sir Thomas Gage, birt. of Hingrave Mrs. Baldie, of Meard's-court, WardourHal, Soffolk, to Lidy Mary Ann Brown, street. Just as the minister was about to his lordship's second daughter

conclude his seroon, she suddenly fell from At St Pancras, Mr. R. C. Sale, of Surrey. her seat and instantly expired. street, Strand, solicitor, to Elizabeth, the In Bennett-street, the Rs. Dr, Ackland, youngest daughter of the late George Wye, rector of Christ Church, Surry, and chaplain Oporto, esg.

to the Fistimongers' Company, 6o.

Peter

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Peter Pierson, esų. one of the benchers of fortunately, other advice prevailej. Towards the Inner Temple.

the latter end of the war, he was brought up In Great Queen-street, Lincoln's inn fields, from Scotland, for the purpose of being sent Mr. William Nunn, only son of Mr. Janies N. with overtures to the American general; debookseller, 21.

lays, indecisions, and at length the resignation At Greenwich, Captain Johr

. Bouc bier, lieu- of the minister finally prevented that measure tenant. governor of the Royal Hospital, 61. being resorted to. Lieutenant-Colonel Stew.

In Upper Seymour-street, Miss Emily Cbar. art will be long and sincerely regretted by all lette Chambers, eldest daughter of Sir Samuel who enjoyed his friendship, as one not only C.

possessed of the best abilities, and great knowAt Camden place, Mrs. Ellis, widow of ledge of the world; but of the most benevoMajor-general E, of Kempsey, Worcester. lent qualities of the heart: with such polite acshire.

complishments and amiable mann:rs, as are the In Seymour-place, the Hon. Mrs. Corn. true characteristics of the well bred and finished wallis, sister of Lord Bayning.

gentleman. At his house in Grattun street, the Most Mr. Andrzw Oswald. He was the fifth son Noble John Deris Browne, Marquis of Sligo, of the late Andrew Oswald, o: Glenhesd, in Earl of Altamont, Viscount Westport, and Stirlingshire; he was bred to the honourable Baron Mounteagle, in the United King- and luciative profession of a writer to the Sigdom; also a governor of the county of Mayo, net, in Edinburgh, a d his talents were such, and custos rotulorum of the county of Clare. that he might, in a few years, have been His lordship was born in 1756, succeeded to eminent, ha not his attention been taken up the family honours and estates in 1730, and with the politics of the day, which ran very in 1787 ‘married Lady Louisa Catharine, high a few years ago in Scotland; and as he, daughter of the late Earl Howe.

On occa

from principle, espoused the cause of the op. sion of the union between Great Britain and pressed and persecuted, had a more general Ireland, he was elevated to the dignity of and correct knowledge of public affairs, than marquis in December, 1800, and in 1806 was many of his contemporaries; and was more created a peer of the United Kingdom. He capable of expressing himself, clearly and disis succeeded by his only son Howe Peter, tinctly, on public men and measures, which Earl of Altamont, burn in 1788.

often confounded, and frequently against their At Hampstead, aged 80 years, Lieutenant. will, convinced his opponents of their error; Colonel Robert Stewart, who had been many bis superior abilities orien created him eneyears a martyr to most distressing and compli. mies, for those who have an interest in supcated complaints, which he bore with the great- porting a corrupt system, very seldom like to est fortitude and resignation. This gentlemen, acknowledge that they are defeated in arguentered early in life into the service of his ment. When the whig ministers came into country, in 175-1: and in 1755 was particularly power, Lord Lauderdale was appointed as godistinguished at the battle of the Mononga hela, vernor to India. Mr. Oswald, had then a comin North America, where he commanded a munication with his lordship, respecting an troop of light horse, raised principally as appointment under him, in that settlement; body guard to the commander in chief, 'Ge. but another arrangement took place in the neral Braddock. During the course of that ministry, and Lord Lauderdale was sent ambasbloody action, he had the honour to remount sador to France, which completely frustrated the General four times, having two horses Mr. Oswald's expectations. Soon after that killed under himseli; and after the general had disappointment, he returned to Stirling, where received a mortal wound, and the remnant of he 10l.vwed the profession of writer; but his the army had retreated, he had the good for- mind being rather unhinged from his hopes of tune, assisted by only four privates of his own going to India being defeated, he soon left and troop (the rest being either killed or wounded) went to Glasgow, where he staid but a short to carry the commander in chief off the field of time, and then returned to Edinburgh. In this battle, across a broad river, under a heavy fire unsettled state, and being fond of society, and from the enemy, thereby rescuing his person frequently of convivial company, perhaps, as from the cruelty of the savages. In the course a consequence of some irregularities, by which of that war, he was intrusted with several dif- he contracted a consumptive habit, which rapidficult commands, and had the happiness to give ly increased; and by the advice or his friends in entire satisfaction to the different generals unl. Edinburgh, he took a journey by sea to Londer whom he served, of which the most am- don, in the hope that the change of air and cliple testimonies remain among his papers. n.ate, might restore bim to health, and to his Lieutenant-Colonel Stewart lived in great friends again; but the disorder had taken too friendship and intimacy for many years, with deep root to be removed; it baffled the skill of that truly good and great man the late men eminent in the healing art. For four General Washington. At the beginning of months, (the time he had been in Lundon) he the late American war, he endeavoured to was gradually declining, until he was reduced remove the very erroneous opinions the mini- at last to a mere skeleton. He kept his bed stets of that day had formed of the general's only about nine days, and died the oth of No. character, and military-abilities; but most une vember, 1808, aged 33 years. Mr. Oswald,

Was

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The following is a statement of the quan

DIED. tity of strong beer brewed by the first twelve At his house, near London Bridge, in his houses in London, from the 5th July, 1808, 69th year, Francis Garrati, esq. an eminent to the 5th January, 1809:--

tea dealer. A gentleman whose upright and Barrels.

Barrels, conscientious conduct as a cradesman had Barclay 64,361 Combe .... 25,439 gained him the respect of all his mercantile Brown & Parry 48,196 Taylor 18,095 and commercial correspondents, and whose Hanbury. 41,554 Goodwyn 15,678 pleasing inoffensive manners had obtained Whitbread 40,719 J. Calvert .. 14,881 the esteem of, and conimanded general Meux

39,292 Elliott 14,877 admiration from, an extensive circle of friends F. Calvert 32,628 Clowes 14,693 and acquaintance. MARRIED.

In Brook-street, Grosvenor-square, William At St. Andrew's, Holborn, George Wigley Bond, esq. second son of Sir James B. bart. Perrott, esq. of Craycombe House, in the 21. county of Worcester, and captain in the At Dulwich, Miss Suft, daughter of R. F. 3d dragoons, to Miss Yates, only daughter of S. esq. of Lambeth Terrace Joseph Y. esq. of Peel Hall, in the county of In Tudor-street, Mr. Joseph Cobb, second Lancaster, and grand-daughter of the late son of T. C. esq. banker, of Lombard-street. Hon. Mr. Justice Yates.

In Cornhill, Josiah Barnard, esq. banker. At St. George's, Hanover-square, Francis At Mr. Watkins's, Charing cross, Miss Hare Naylor, esq. of Welbeck-street, to Ma- Sopbia Walker, late of Stalford, 14. ria Mealey, widow of Lieutenant-colonel At Deptford, Miss Mary Anne Milne, Ridgway M. late of the Madras establishe daughter of the Rev. Dr. M. ment.

In Westminster-bridge-road, Mrs. Mnry Ac Twickenham, Major Charles Ward Anne Cook, wife of Mr. Mr. James C. surgeon. Orde, of the 9th light dragoons, to Miss In Blandford-street, Robert Coningbam, esq. Browne.

late of Londonderry. At Lambeth, C. H. Wohrnan, esq. of At Clapham, Mrs. A. Walde. Riga, to Miss E. Scongall, eldest daughter of In Fetter-lane, Mr. 7. D. Browne, attor. George S. esq.

ney. At St. James's, Robert Townsend Far- In Little College street, Mr. M Daniel. quhar, second son of Sir Walter F. to Maria, At Camden-town, Mr. T. Austin, of Castle. youngest daughter of the late Francis Lau- street, Leicester-square.

In Prince's-street, Bank of England, Ralph At Mary-le-bonne Church, Henry Drury, Johnson Wall, esy, esq. fellow of King's College, Cambridge, to In Grosvenor-place, the Hon. Henry Percy, Caroline, second daughter of A. W. Taylor, son of Lord Lovaine. esq. of Burham House, Herts.

In Queen- Anne-street, West, William At Waltham Abbey, Mr. John Whitehead, Blauw, esq. 61. of Dalton, Yorkshire, tu Miss Esther Wal- At his son-in law's, Gloucester-terrace, ton, eldest daughter of William W. esq. of William Phillips, esq. of Chase green, EnEpping Forest.

field. At Chiswick, the Rev. Henry Hunter, of In Surry-place, Kent-road, Joseph Lindley, Hammersmith, 10 Miss Graham, of Turn. esq. ham-green.

At Battersea Rise, Mary Sopbia, wife of At Wanstead House, his serene Highness T. Eardon, esq. the Prince of Condé, to her serene Highness In King-street, Cheapside, G. Slack, esq. the Princess Dowager of Moraco.

71. At St. George's, Queen-square, Samuel In Camberwell grove, Mrs. Agrey, 77. Welchman, esq. of Stamford street, to Char- In Sloane-street, Patrick Home, esq. of lotte, daughter of the late Edward Gordon, Wedderburne, in the county of Berwick, for esq. of Bromley, Middlesex.

which he was many years a representative in Captain M.Leod, of the royal navy, to parliament. Miss Bennett, ot Half Moon-street, Picca. At Osborne's Hotel, Lieut. William Skelton, dilly.

of the royal navy, 27.

He was the third son at St. Saviour's, Southwark, the Rev. of the late Arnoldus Jones Skelton, esq. of W. Harrison, chaplain of that parish, to Papcastle, in the county of Cumberland, and Miss Hunt, of Walcot place, Lambeth. first cousin to the present Marquis Corn

By special license, at the house of the Earl wallis. of Kenmare, in Seymour-street, Portman- At Long-acre Chapel, during divine service, square, Sir Thomas Gage, birl. of Hingrave Mrs. Baldie, of Meard's-court, Wardoura Hall, Suffolk, to Lady Mary Ann Brown, street. Just as the minister was about to his iordship's second daughter

conclude his seroion, she suddenly fell from At St Pancras, Mr. R. C. Sale, of Surrey, her seat and instantly expired. street, Strand, solicitor, to Elizabeth, the In Bennett-street, the Riv. Dr. Ackland, youngest daughter of the late George Wye, rector of Christ Church, Surry, and chaplain of Oporto, esq.

to the Fishimongers' Company, 65.

Peter

tour, esq.

Peter Pierson, esq. -one

one of the benchers of fortunately, other advice prevailed. Towards the Inner Temple. of the benches the latter end of the war, he was brought up

In Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn fields, from Scotland, for the purpose of being sent Mr. William Nunn, only son of Mr. Janies N. with overtures to the American general; debookseller, 24.

lays, indecisions, and at length the resignation At Greenwich, Captain John Bouchier, lieu- of the minister finally prevented that measure tenant-governor of the Royal Hospital, 61. being resorted to. Lieutenant-Colonel Stew

In Upper Seymour-street, Miss Emily Char- art will be long and sincerely regretted by all Ictte Chambers, eldest daughter of Sir Samuel who enjoyed his friendship, as one not only C.

possessed of the best abilities, and great knowAt Camden place, Mrs. Ellis, widow of ledge of the world; but of the most benevoMajor-general Ē, of Kempsey, Worcester- lent qualities of the heart: with such polite acshire.

complishments and amiable manners, as are the In Seymour-place, the Hon. Mrs. Corn- true characteristics of the wellbred and finished wallis, sister of Lord Bayning,

gentleman. At his house in Grafton street, the Most Mr. Andrew Oswald. He was the fifth son Noble John Denis Browne, Marquis of Sligo, of the late Andrew Oswald, of Glenhead, in Earl of Altamont, Viscount Westport, and Stirlingshire; he was bred to the honourable Baron Mounteagle, in the United King- and lucrative profession of a writer to the Sigdom; also a governor of the county of Mayo, snet, in Edinburgh, a'id his talents were such, and custos rotulorum of the county of Clare. that he might, in a few years, have been His lordship was born in 1756, succeeded to eminent, had not his attention been taken up the family honours and estates in 1780, and with the politics of the day, which ran very in 1787 married Lady Louisa Catharine, high a few years ago in Scotland; and as he, daughter of the late Earl Howe. On occa- from principle, espoused the cause of the opsion of the union between Great Britain and pressed and persecuted, had a more general Ireland, he was elevated to the dignity of and correct knowledge of public affairs, than marquis in December, 1800, and in 1806 was many of his contemporaries; and was more created a peer of the United Kingdom. He capable of expressing himself, clearly and disis succeeded by his only son Howe Peter, tinctly, on public men and measures, which of Altamont, born in 1788.

often confounded, and frequently against their Hampstead, aged 80 years, Lieutenant- will, convinced his opponents of their error; el Robert Stewart, who had been many his superior abilities often created him enea martyr to most distressing and compli- mies, for those who have an interest in sup

complaints, which he bore with the great porting a corrupt system, very seldom like to Fortitude and resignation. This gentlemen, acknowledge that they are defeated in argu-ered early in life into the service of his ment. When the whig ministers came into Fountry, in 1751: and in 1755 was particularly power, Lord Lauderdale was appointed as godistinguished at the battle of the Mononga hela, vernor to India. Mr. Oswald, had then a comin North America, where he commanded a munication with his lordship, respecting an troop of light horse, raised principally as appointment under him, in that settlemeni; body guard to the commander in chief, Ge- but another arrangement took place in the neral Braddock. During the course of that ministry, and Lord Lauderdale was sent ambasbloody action, he had the honour to remount sador to France, which completely frustrated the General four times, having two horses Mr. Oswald's expectations. Soon after that killed under himself; and after the general had disappointment, he returned to Stirling, where received a mortal wound, and the remnant of he folowed the profession of writer ; but his the army had retreated, he had the good for- mind being rather unhinged from his hopes of

assisted by only four privates of his own going to India being defeated, he soon left and

rest being either killed or wounded) went to Glasgow, where he staid but a short commander in chief off the field of time, and then returned to Edinburgh. In this

a broad river, under a heavy fire unsettled state, and being fond of society, and my, thereby rescuing his person frequently of convivial company, perhaps, as

Ity of the savages. In the course a consequence of some irregularities, by which he was intrusted with several dif- he contracted a consumptive habit, which rapid-dnds, and had the happiness to give ly increased; and by the advice of his friends in faction to the different generals un- Edinburgh, he took a journey by sea to Lonnne served, of which the most am- don, in the hope that the change of air and climonies remain among his papers. mate, might restore bim to health, and to his ant-Colonel Stewart lived in great friends again; but the disorder had taken too dp and intimacy for many years, with deep root to be removed; it baffled the skill of ruly good and great man the late men eminent in the healing art. For four Washington. At the beginning of months, (the time he had been in Lundon) he

American war, he endeavoured to was gradually declining, until he was reduced ve the very erroneous opinions the mini- at last to a mere skeleton. He kept his bed of that day had formed of the general's only about nine days, and died the 9th of No-cter, and military abilities; but most un- vember, 1808, aged 33 years. Mr. Oswald,

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