The Method of Teaching and Studying the Belles Lettres: Or, An Introduction to Languages, Poetry, Rhetoric, History, Moral Philosophy, Physics, & C. ...

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W.J. and J. Richardson, J. Walker, 1804
 

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294 ページ - O thou, whose glory fills th' ethereal throne, And all ye deathless powers, protect my son ! Grant him like me to purchase just renown, To guard the Trojans, to defend the crown ; Against his country's foes the war to wage, And rise the Hector of the future age ! So when, triumphant from successful toils Of heroes slain, he bears the reeking spoils, Whole hosts may hail him, with deserv'd acclaim, And say, this chief transcends his father's fame : While pleas'd amidst the general shouts of Troy,...
294 ページ - Thus having spoke, the illustrious chief "of Troy Stretch'd his fond arms to clasp the lovely boy. The babe clung crying to his nurse's breast, Scared at the dazzling helm, and nodding crest.
294 ページ - Yet, while my Hector still survives, I see My father, mother, brethren, all in thee : Alas ! my parents, brothers, kindred, all Once more will perish, if my Hector fall. Thy wife, thy infant, in thy danger share : Oh ! prove a husband's and a father's care! That quarter most the skilful Greeks annoy, Where yon wild fig-trees join the wall of Troy : Thou from this tower defend th...
333 ページ - Two urns by Jove's high throne have ever stood, The source of evil one, and one of good ; From thence the cup of mortal man he fills, Blessings to these, to those distributes ills ; To most, he mingles both : the wretch decreed To taste the bad, unmix'd, is curst indeed ; Pursued by wrongs, by meagre famine driven, He wanders, outcast both of Earth and Heaven.
293 ページ - Silent the warrior smiled, and pleased resign'd To tender passions all his mighty mind; His beauteous princess cast a mournful look, Hung on his hand, and then dejected spoke; Her bosom labour'd with a boding sigh, And the big tear stood trembling in her eye.
293 ページ - Too daring prince! ah, whither dost thou run? Ah, too forgetful of thy wife and son! And think'st thou not how wretched we shall be, A widow I, a helpless orphan he?
300 ページ - Freed from his keepers, thus with broken reins The wanton courser prances o'er the plains ; Or in the pride of youth o'erleaps the mounds, And...
291 ページ - Above, the sire of gods his thunder rolls, And peals on peals redoubled rend the poles. Beneath, stern Neptune shakes the solid ground; The forests wave, the mountains nod around ; Through all their summits tremble Ida's woods, And from their sources boil her hundred floods.
400 ページ - Let others better mould the running mass Of metals, and inform the breathing brass, And soften into flesh a marble face; Plead better at the bar; describe the skies, And when the stars descend, and when they rise: But, Rome! 'tis thine alone, with awful sway, « To rule mankind, and make the world obey, Disposing peace and war thy own majestic way; To tame the proud, the fetter'd slave to free: These are imperial arts, and worthy thee.
307 ページ - For him through hostile camps I bent my way, For him thus prostrate at thy feet I lay; Large gifts proportion'd to thy wrath I bear; O hear the wretched, and the gods revere! "Think of thy father, and this face behold! See him in me, as helpless and as old! Though not so wretched: there he yields to me, The first of men in sovereign misery!

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