ページの画像
PDF
ePub

The following is part of Sir Cecil Wray's speech to the Electors of Westminster: “ I have no private interest or ambition to gratify; the King has not a place in his

gift, which I would accept; I never have accepted nor ever will accept of any office “ or emolument whatever. I will either be the independent representative of independent 6. Eleflors, or I will not fit in Parliament.” Such is the language of Sir Cecil. Can Mr. Fox, with truth, make a fimilar declaration ?

It is necessary to acquaint the public*, that' the agents of a certain party, which has long been aiming, either by violence or corruption, to subvert or underinine, all that remains of independence and integrity in this kingdom, have neither by threats or promises fucceeded in their attempts to profitute the property of The Morning Post to their pose. Alarmed at the increasing demand which has lately been made for the Morning Post, inconsequenc of its fpirited and truly confiitutional principles, they have insidioully endeavoured to counteract its usual circulation; and have even had recourse to the pitiful practice of employing bireling wretches to sical the paper from several Coffee-houses in London and Westminster, relying on such means to prevent the dark and desperate manæuvres of the Coalition being expoli d to the world. It is hoped that the spirit of the people will revolt at these untair attacks on the freedom of the press, and that those who chuse to honour The Morning Post with their preference will henceforward take care not to be imposed upon by the substitution of any other paper, as well as to guard against fimilar praclices in future

“ In the time of Antichrist, a Fox shall make his den in the same place where King 6 Alexander did make his gates, and he shall dig in the earth so long till he pierce it «s through, and come among the Jews; and when they see the Fox, they shall have great “ marvel of him, for they never saw such a beast; but other beasts they have among 66 them many. And they hall chace this Fox, and pursue him until he be fled again “ into the hole he came from, and then shall they dig after him, until they come to " the gates that Alexander did make of great stones, well laid with mortar; then thall 66 they break these gates, and find the way forth.” Mandeville's Travels, Chap. 84.

"It is no great wonder that the friends of a certain Candidate in Westminster are so witty, as most of them have been used to the attic story. A Candidate should canvass in å high phaeton, as it is more probable he will meet his friends in the garret than in the cellar.

The beautiful and accomplished Ladies We are among the Ladies who interest themselves for the Black Protector. They lately gave a treat to above 150 of the mob, and presided themselves at the entertainment.

Mrs. E----'s child lies between Lord C---- and the P--- of W. The Lady infifts upon it, that it is the Prince's; but the latter denies it on account of its complexion, which greatly resembles that of Carlo Khan.

[ocr errors]

* We give this long paragraph (copied verbatim from the Morning Poft) to our readers, as the most remark. able piece of Editorship impudence, as well as folly, that perhaps has ever occurred in the annals of newspaper management. Were all the PUFFS of that notel puffing impofter, Katterfelto, selected, and climax after climax picked out of the aggregate for the purpose of forming ONE great and tremendous Puff, that thould almost blow truth to the Devil, we are decidedly of opinion, such an exaggerated Puff would bardly equal, much less exceed the LIE here told, which, for curiosity's fake, we preserve in our collection, as the most laugbable piece of allurance we ever met with in a newspaper.

+ Here ends the Puff. Now, good Mr. Editor, are you not a little out of breath? Has not this exceljive exertion of your lying faculty rather coverjirained you --Pray ponder well, and examine yourself. We are rather doubtful that this very gross lie must have overstretched the finer ramifications of your brain in its workings, and probably injured the texture of those beautiful serpentine windings that are so often set a calculating schemes for the country's good, and the overthrow of this damned Coalition. Do, dear Mr. Editor, de careful purself, or you will certainly burit !—Then, alas what must poor Mr. Pitt do

Carlo's

Carlo's black- troops relieve guard regularly every morning. A certain number of houses are taken in Westminfter, and the ieafe made over once in twenty-four hours, just after the tenant has done his duty at the Huftings.

Thursday, at the poll for Westminster, it was remarked that the light troops were polling. “It is very true (observed a gentleman) and the sky-light troops too.”

Yesterday three friends to the Man of the People, were taken into the custody, for 108 great earneltness to serve their patron, by offering to vote without a legal qualification.

The metropolis is no longer to be looked up to as the great exemplar of political conduct to the rest of their fellow-countrymen. The free and honelt yeomanry of York did not hesitate to brand the vice and idiotism of the times off;---where then, ye Westminster Electors, where are your apposite emotions of scorn and execration? The present contest is not between Wray and Fox, but between the Constitution and its natural enemies-between private character and infamy-between public credit and national bankruptcy-between England and France-between God and Belial! Halt not then between two opinions—chule ye this day-Wray, Pitt, and truth for ever!

It appears to many people rather extraordinary that the Duc de Chartres and other affluent foreigners should at this time, above all others, have taken up their abode in London.

It was pretty currently given out, for these two days past, that Lord Hood was dead. What end such a report could serve, even for electioneering purposes, we are not quick fighted enough to discern; but we are happy to have it in our power to say, that it is tog tally without foundation.

Most people think Mr. Fox's late fudden rise on the Poll a very extraordinary circumstance; and a correspondent, who is not very apt to put the worst construction on things, cannot help expressing his own doubts, along with those of others, that every thing is not altogether as it ought. If, however, any have been so weak or so profti gate hitherto, as to be induced, either through threats or promises, to act an improper part, it is to be hoped, now, such criminal practices will go no further, and that all others who may happen to be tampered with, will take proper warning. Independent of the enormity and guilt of taking a false oath, every one must fee the legal hazards he runs from the refolution published by the oppofite party, of demanding and supporting the most rigorous scrutiny.

Yesterday morning Mr. Fox canvaffed St. Martin's Le Grand, for near two hours, at: tended by a great crowd of people. He has been for some days afflicted with a bilious complaint.

“ I'n lay you five guineas," says a celebrated canvasser, and stake the money in your own hands, that you will not vote for Mr. Fox." “ Done,” says the Independent Elector of Westminster. Thus one more vote procured for the Man of the People, and the Independent Elector boasts of winning his wager.

Lord Holland's death will kick Mr. Fox up stairs, as the late Lord Chesterfield'express’d it, and by giving him a seat in the House of Peers, save the city of Weftminster from the toil and turbulence of the Scrutiny threatened by the clubs.

The present struggle for Westminster is rather for example fake, than for purpose, to few their sense of public credit and public virtue,

any other

[blocks in formation]

Armite cancraffing charatier. When a woman ceases to blush, the has lost the most

The following words of the late Dr. Gregory are humbly recommended to a certain powerful charm of beauty. I like to see an easy dignity in a woman, in public * be guarded with great discretion and goodnature, otherwise it will create many places, but not that confident ease, that unabashed countenance, which seeins to set

"people at defiance! Wit is the most dangerous talent she can possess; it must Spitalfields weavers) tendered their votes for Mr. Fox on Friday and Saturday laft, but,

No less than one hundred unwafhed, unshaven, and Shirtles rogues, (alias journeymen were rejected. This accounts for the majority which Mr. Fox acquired on two days owing to the excellent precaution of having the parish books at the Hustings, they poll. The plan being now defeated, we may expect the Westminster Election will be declined in a few days.

The following is part of Sir Cecil Wray's speech to the Electors of W.

eft " I have no private interest or ambition to gratify; the King has r “ gift, which I would accept; I never have accepted nor ever will

le man, or emolument whatever. " I will either be the independent reprer

Ar. Fox to " Eleclors, or I will not fit in Parliament.” Such is the lanMr. Fox, with truth, make a fimilar declaration ?

symptoms to his It is necessary to acquaint the public*, that' the ager'

ore its final close long been aiming, either by violence or corruption. remains of independence and integrity in this kingd

i to be on the following succeeded in their attempts to prostitute the pro

a fictitious muster on the pose. Alarmed at the increasing demand which

frighten Sir Cecil from his inconsequenc of its fpirited and truly confiit voured to counteract its usual circulatir tice of employing bireling wretches to

imall nuinber of bad votes on both and Westminster, relying on such

und be in the proportion of leven to the Coalition being expol d to revolt at these unfair attacks

ved in the house of Lord - ; his Lordship nour The Morning Pos

on of “ Unaccounted Millions !!” posed upon by the fut

ibs and duchesses, swindlers, uncertificated bankpractices in future

wiat which alone could be expected, and which would « In the tim

other hero, whose property and principles could have been « Alexander 65 through 6 mars 46

exhibited to any

on.

qyratdepended

enemies,

The only reason that can be assigned why the women of the town are so much on the fade of popular members, is, that they are in the habit of obeying the wills of their constituents.

The late Man of the People has cost some of the younglings of the party 100,000l. at least in counter securities, besides the Coalition.

A great deal of nonsense has been industriously circulated,' concerning Sir Cecil Wray's proposal relative to Chelsea Hospital, as if he had made a proposal at once unjult and inhuman. Sir Cecil only proposed, for the public good, a commutation of cofily lodgings, and stated invariable fare, for an annual pension to be enjoyed by the old foldier, how and with whom he pleased; an option which would undoubtedly be agreeable to almost all the inhabitants of Chelsea Hospital. Sir Cecil's humanity in this instance is perhaps not less conspicuous than in his generous motion in the House of Commons, respecting the defects of prisons, and the sufferirgs of prisoners.

There

There were no less than six Ducheses of D---n---e on the town yesterday, canvassing for Mr. Fox. Her Grace, four of her Grace's women, and Nicky Noodle's wife, the needy Squire of Northamptonshire (who, though he has got glass eyes--fcurvy politician! cannot see the end of his wife's canvass) all equipped and titled as her Grace. A tallows chandler, who had been careffèd by these mock Duchesses, humorously burst from his fhop, and exclaimed with King Richard--

« Sure there be fix Duchesses in the streets,

Five have I killed to-day, instead of her!". A correfpondent obferves, that Mr. Fox must unavoidably get the Election, as there are many hundreds of the inhabitants of Spitalfields in that Gentleman's interest, who have not yet polled.

A certain Duke is quite charmed with the public and political conduct of his amiable Duchess, and regularly calls for the Morning Poft at breakfast, to read the history of her Grace's canvals.

The current prices of Westminster voters for the last four days, as settled by a certain Committee, are as follow :

From Spitalfields, and parts adjacent, seven shillings and fix-pence.

From Old Gravel-lane, Whitechapel, Field-lane, and Black-boy-alley, a quart of gin and bitters, hot with nutmeg.

From Kent-street to Rag-fair, two drams of Usquebaugh.

If, however, any voter was found to faulter in his oath, or otherwise misconduct himself at the Hultings, the agreement to be void, or else to remain in full force and virtue.

Brookes's and Weltjie's now exhibit a most useful, though agre able scene, of the weeping, wailing, and gnashing of teeth, of those political devils, who were expelled lately out of Paradise ! each accursing the impetuous temper of the other ! all lamenting! few consoling! and none amending!

It is highly gratifying to find what good sense and decent firmness has appeared among the Westminster Electors on the late extraordinary exertions of undue influence by our female canvassers. Several fhopkeepers plainly told them, that they suffered no creature breathing to controul their opinions and affections; and one very sensible tradesman in Bondftreet, very shrewdly fuggefted to the Duchess, his admiration of all the mild and unassuming perfections of the Queen; and above all, in reference to politics, the unmedling spirit that had never ceased to adorn her throne. Foreigners are horridly chagrined at the Elections going fo universally in favour of Administration. There is now nolonger any hope for them of a public bankruptcy, or the constitution being changed to a republican aristocracy.

The little wantons, who with happy effrontery paraded it about the town, representthe Duchess of

and Counters of -, are to be portioned by a subscription purse from the first money they may have at Brookes's, and to be married to those waiters who shall most distinguish themselves in the fabrication of votes !

No less than three hand-bills were circulated on Saturday, relative to Lord Mountmorres's intention to impose a bad vote for Westminster upon the High Bailiff. The truth is, that upon the objection being made by Mr. Fox's agents, the lease was examined, and it appeared, that it was specifically mentioned, that he was rated, and paid

li

the

.

Lady Grosvenor, Lady Dornhoff, Lady Cr-, just come from Paris, and Lady Worlley, are among the canvassers who have the modesly to attempt to dičtate to the honest tradesman and independent artizan,

The Duke of Devonshire, who is certainly, though a silent yet a very sensible man, foretold the events of the present Election as they have happened, and urged Mr. Fox tó accept of Knaresborough or Derby.

The sudden inflation of Charles Fox's Poll, is the worst of all bad fymptoms to his çause-the morbid blush of an expiring hectic—the taper blazing before its final closethe phrenzy of desperation.

The game now played against Sir Cecil Wray, is ascertained to be on the following principle of jockeyship. The clubs are all jockeys, to make a fictitious mufter on the Poll; outnuinbering the real voters of Westminster; and to frighten Sir Cecil from his determined purpose of a Scrutiny.

There can be no doubt but there must be no small nuinber of bad votes on both fides; but Mr. Fox has most, as near as can be in the proportion of seven to four.

Yesterday two more executions were served in the house of Lord —; his Lordship having been security for his friend, the son of “ Unaccounted Millions !!"

The support of Mr. Fox, from drabs and duchesses, swindlers, uncertificated bankrupts, and foreigners, is exactly that which alone could be expected, and which would have been exhibited to any other hero, whole property and principles could have been equally depended on.

The following words of the late Dr. Gregory are humbly recommended to a certain female canvaffing character." When a woman ceases to blush, she has lost the most “ powerful charm of beauty. I like to see an easy dignity in a woman, in public

places; but not that confident ease, that unabashed countenance, which seems to set “people at defiance! Wit is the most dangerous talent she can possess; it must “ be guarded with great discretion and goodnature, otherwise it will create many 66 enemies.”

No less than one hundred unwashed, unshaven, and shirtless rogues, (alias journeymen Spitalfields weavers) tendered their votes for Mr. Fox on Friday and Saturday laft, but, owing to the excellent precaution of having the parish books at the Hustings, they were rejected. This accounts for the majority which Mr. Fox acquired on two days poll. The plan being now defeated, we may expect the Westminster Election will be declined in a few days.

The only reason that can be assigned why the women of the town are so much on the hde of popular members, is, that they are in the habit of obeying the wills of their constituents.

The late Man of the People has cost fonie of the younglings of the party 100,000l. at least in counter securities, besides the Coalition.

A great deal of nonsense has been industriously circulated, concerning Sir Cecil Wray's proposal relative to Chelsea Hospital, as if he had made a proposal at once unjust and inhuman. Sir Cecil only proposed, for the public good, a commutation of cofily lodgings, and stated invariable fare, for an annual pension to be enjoyed by the old soldier, how and with whom he pleased; an option which would undoubtedly be agreeable to almoft all the inhabitants of Chelsea Hospital. Sir Cecil's humanity in this instance is perhaps not less conspicuous than in his generous motion in the House of Commons, respecting the defects of prisons, and the sufferirgs of prisoners.

There

« 前へ次へ »