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Among the numerous bawlers for Fox was a boy yesterday, in Leicester-fields, who archly vociferated, Fox for ever! Fox for ever !--in the cells of Newgate !

Popular scorn at the Coalition Gang begins now to be changing very sensibly into popular indignation. Very few of them, indeed, have any property that can be amenable; however, let them look to their perfons; the laws and legal vengeance of a country, irritated and injured beyond all bounds of possible patience, may soon be able to reach them.

Fox's party, in regard to the murder of the constable, have acted in the fame manner as Shakspeare paints lago, after his murdering Roderigo; they being the first to fab, and the first to cry out murder!

Who is the wifest man? Lord North. What are the proofs of his wisdom? His Coalition with Charles Fox, who pledged himfelf to bring his head to the block; therefore, although Lord North has a very large hend, no body can fay he is a block-head. The Members of the new Parliament are making preparations for war.

The leaders are beginning to rally their forces. The artillery of the Oppotition is to be directed by those able engineers, Fox and North; but Mr. Pitt and the friends of liberty will be triumphant, as in last Parliarment they defeated the enemies of this country, and beat the Coalition out of their entrenchments.

In a few days a Fox will be hunted in St. Stephen's Common; where the Prince of Wales and other eminent sportlinen will attend, in order to enjoy the pleasures of the chace.

Mr. Burke is preparing a very long and inflammatory speech concerning his Majesty's Prerogative; but the friends of the King need not be apprehensive of any dangerous consequences, as our modern Cicero will bring to the recollection of his auditors the ridicule of Horace--- PARTURIUNT Montes."-Much work, and little wool.

We are happy to inform the public, that if ever Jack Lee should again attempt to destroy a charter, which, according to his own language, is “ only a roll of parch"ment with a piece of wax appending to it,” Mr. Dundas is resolved to seal up his mouth with a bit of waaux.

The Coalition profetled a great anxiety for the public credit; but we wilh they would regulate their own private credit, as honest John Bull can never believe that his purse should be open to men who squander away their own wealth, and are in fact the beggars of the public.

Mr. Burke, at the late Buckinghamshire meeting, said, that “ if we ever parted with the present House of Commons, we could not easily get such another,Never did Mr. Burke speak with more truth or propriety!

Orkney being a famous place for Geefe, and Kirkwall, for which the Man of the People is elected, being in Orkney, it is very furprizing that the Fox. should be folie cited to protect the Geele!

Mr. Fox's wisdom has been greatly praised, and some have gone so far as to call him The Second Solomon; but the best proof of his wisdom is in the selection of his friends, who must be allowed to be men of the highest abilities, and the most fuòlime genius, as they swarın in Spitalfields, St. Giles's, and the attic stories of Westminster.

“My dear Boreas (says Carlo Khan one day to his beloved fpouse) our mutual affec* tions have gained us many enemies; but let us kiss and be friends--and a fig for the « world." Borcas "then held out his chuckle head, while the dear bewitching black Carlo Khan mumbled his spouse's delicious blubber lips, and clasping the lovely creature by the middle--fo!- fo!--fo!--they funk down in exstatic bliss, and grunted aloud-“ All for Love, or the World well loft!"

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The Coalition puppies wear black collars, as characteristic of the black and insidious actions of their favourites. Were the leaders of the Coalition to be exalted, as their infamous conduct deserves, pray what collars would best suit their necks?

The Duke of D----e is certainly under more obligations to Mr. Fox, tlian many people imagine; for, in the first place, Mr. Fox's support of the American rebellion, and the encouragement given by Mr. Fox to the House of Bourbon during the war, has sunk the value of his Grace's lands full one third of what they were worth ten years ago; and now, to complete the obligation, he finks the character of a Lady, in order to bring both upon a level.---This is kind !--- This is like Shylock's courtesy to Antonio

We are in fornied that Mr. Fox has strenuously exerted himself for the repeal of the marriage act. In this, as in every thing else, Mr. Fox has an eye to his own interest. This bill originated from the clandestine marriage of Mr. Fi's father with the fifter of the prefent Duke of Richmond, by which alliance only Charles is entitled to the name of a gentleman.

F A CT S. Mr. Fox's Committee having, agreeable to all their extraordinary conduct, publified hand bills, offering a reward of 100 guineas, on conviction of the offender or oifenders, concerneil in the riots of Monday lait; and having been base enough to assert, that thole ruffians issued forth from Hood and Wray's Cominittee Room; the following questions are put to Mr. Fox's immaculate Committee, which will at once confute their aciertion, and clearly evince by whom the banditti were hired, and from whom they were fent *.

Q U E S T I O N S. Is it not notorious, that, from the beginning of the Election to this time, upwards of an hundred chairmen, porters, and butchers, have been entertained with victuals and drink at the Unicorn, Henrietta-street, the Queen's Head, Tavistock-row, and the

King's Head, James-street, Covent Garden; from whence, upon a whistle being given, : they issue forth, and knock down indiscriminately all that do not appear to be in Mr. Fox's interest of?

Did not the Rev. Mr. Bate Dudley, Sir Godfrey Webster, Sir William Milner, Lord Robert Spencer, Mr. Sheridan, Colonel Fitzpatrick, and Mr. Porter, appear to bail all the ruffians that were apprehended in the fact of allaulting the peace officers, three of which offenders are now detained in Newgate, on the deposition of feveral witneiles who have identified them? And did not thole Gentlemen declare, at the same time, that they did not know, and had never before seen the offenders ?

Were not fix ruffians taken at the aforementioned houses, after the riot of Saturday se'nnight, some of them in bed, with their bludgeons lying by them, discoloured with the bloody effects of their violence; and did not Meffrs. O'Brien, Sheridan, and Rate Dudley offer to bail them? And, extraordinary as it may appear, did not Sir Samplon Wright, the next morning, discharge the very men, upon no other surety of their future peaceable behaviour than their own promife?

And yet none of these Gentlemen are accessaries either before or after the fact !
* Hood and Wray's Committee offered a reward of 50 guineas !!!!
+ The insult and outrage committed by a bired banditii

, dreiled in blue jackets, on the side of Hond and Wray, and their rasi project of destroying the ledan chairs, compelled the owners to take up the frieblaia to defend their property. Hence arose the firjt riot : yet never did Irishmen behave better; for when they had effectually de. feated their adversaries, through their future orderly behaviour and attendance near the Huitings, which becinie a terror to the opposite party, they actually preserved the peace, and jecured ihe freedom of Election!--so much for the veracity of the Morning Liar.

Nin 2

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Yesterday about one o'clock, the Honourable Charles James Fox addressed Lord Hood, and made a propofal for cloting the poll at two o'clock, on a report being generally circulated, that the unfortunate widow of the peace officer, murdered on Monday laft, was determined (contrary to the opinion of her friends, and utterly against the opinion of every person in the house where he died) to bury her husband at the ulual time of clofing the poll, in the Church-yard of St. Paul, Covent Garden, which propofition was immediately affented to by the other candidates; and as many falle reports have been circulated, that the friends of Lord Hood and Sir Cecil Wray are at the expence. of the funeral, the public may rest assured, that every offer of service that has been made to the widow of the deceafed, that might in any manner alleviate her unhappy fate, has been rejected, she being in such good circumstances in life, as render every thing of the kind unnecessary.

It is understood that the principal reason of the body being buried in the above church-yard (whereas the deceased lived in Wapping) is at the lole will of the widow, The having a nephew already buried in that ground.

Thę audacious and unwarrantable attempts that have been made by the scandalous advertisements and hand bills, in order to induce the public to attribute to the friends of Lord Hood and Sir Cecil Wray the cause of the several riots and acts of cruelty that have been committed during the Election for Westminster, and particularly the unprovoked riot and cruel murder on Monday latt, are too gross; and the contrary of such assertions too well known to stand in need of contradiction. The curious resolutions of Mr. Fox's Committee at the Shakespeare, and the hand-bills stuck up, and so liberally distributed about the town on Tuesday, in order to bring back to recollection the affair of St. George's Fields, appear on the very face of them to be calculated for the purpose of inflaming the minds of the people, and of creating riot and confusion.

Their pretended offers of rewards, and advertising for evidence are perfectly burlesque, unless they intend by it to buy off and suppress any evidence that may be offered against their hireling butchers..

The Scrutiny promised for Westminster, and which will undoubtedly take place, will lay open, it is generally believed, such scenes of the most abandoned proceedings, as must for ever disgrace the opposite party. They were open enough in many transactions fufficiently culpable; but others, ftill 'more heinous than those, remain yet behind the curtain. 'If, therefore, those dark things are brought to light, so that their authors may meet the just rewards of their crimes, we may naturally hope, by one mode of punishment or other, to get happily rid of the farther intrigues of some men, the study and business of whose public conduct it has ever been to trample on the laws, violate the rights of individuals, and disturb the peace of society.

The conduct of Mr. Fox (says a correspondent) upon the riot of last Monday, is an archetype of the powers, abilities, and the system of conduct which has pervaded the whole of his pablic character :

To confound and puzzle, to perplex and confuse the understandings of men in their notions of right and wrong, is the peculiar faculty of the grand impostor :

Let any man see whether this is not the case, by an attentive perulal of any authentic specimen of his boasted eloquence : No information, no clearness, no elucidation, but an aptitude to twist and torture a fact, to worry the understandings of his opponents, and pervert and misrepresent truth to answer his own purpose.

The principle of his conduct has been the same as his boasted eloquence upon the riot on Mond.y:

What is the plain matter of fact? A riot is apprehended, the magistrates are convened, the civil power is strengthened by an additional number of constables, legally

appointed;

..pointed; the party of Mr. Fox begin the riot, in the affray a constable is killed in the discharge of his duty, by a stroke of a bludgeon from Mr. Fox's party. What is now his attempt ? To charge the innocent with the murder, to prove that the justice who wished to prevent was the cause of the riot, and author of the assassination ? Hear this, ye impartial, if the brains of the populace in Westoninster are too much addled by his liquor or his fophiftry:

Let the people at large listen to these facts, and approve if they can of the great confounder of right and wrong, and wish to lend their assistance to such a man to be the Lord or Protector of England.---Monfirum avitiis nulla vittute redemptum.

Charles Fox is returned as Member of Parliament for a district of burghs in the Orkneys, and Mr. Sinclair is turned out of Caithness, the Ultima Thule of the ancients, and finds shelter in Loftwithiel, in Cornwall. This is a fine jumble, and shews how much the interests and connections of the gentlemen of England and Scotland are blended with one another. This is a striking proof of a national coalition.

Nicholas Caffon, who was killed last Monday in Covent Garden, was for many years one of those persons called crimps, whose business it is to procure soldiers for the EastIndies, in which employment he had amassed enough to retire upon.

Great preparations are making to usher Mr. Fox to the Hustings on Monday next, with all the pomp of a victorious General, crowned with well earned laurels in his country's service. Among the many embleins of pageantry and thew, an elegant filk flag, highly ornamented with the WEAVERS ARMS, richly worked in variegated c9lours, an inscription in large letters of gold and silver, stating in what memorable year, and under whofe aufpices the FREEDOM of ELECTION for Westminster was extended to Spitalfields, will precede the Man of the People, borne by Sir Jeffery Dunstan and Sam House; Mr. Fox's household band (the marrow-bones and cleavers) playing that much-admired air,“ Sce the conquering Here comes.” The colours are to be contecrated at the head of the troops, and in front of the Hustings, by Lieutenant General B-, and the Colonels F and No, in the absence of the three illustrious Field Marshals, who were unfortunately taken prisoners of war on Monday last, and who have not yet been exchanged, no officers of equal rank having fallen into the hands. of the enemy.

While her Grace was squeezing and fingering the butchers, Capt. M-swas amufing their female connections with his great parts, at every ale house and gin-shop in Westminster; and it is actually taid, that his own coachman stepping accidentally into a courtezan's ball, at the Cock in Petty France, found the whole coinpany dresled in Fox's cockades, and his master singing and drinking with forty half-naked whores and rogues. of the lowest description-quantum mutatur ab illo !

As those who have heard that famous Coalition song, and knew the former sentiments and opinions of the apoftate partizan, to whom the aspiring Cataline is indebted for his Election success, the following short account of the Captain's converfion may not be unamusing to those who are altonished at his change of conduct :- When that infamous junction of Fox and North took place, Capt. M. -S, to whole wit and poetical talents we must with all the world give acknowledged praise, composed a long. called The Coalition, which we may venture to say was the best ever written on any Lubject : to this song, replete with the justest fatire and finest point, which the Captain fung at all his clubs, and in various companies he frequented in this metropolis, was owing the universal odium and reprobation in which that curled and abandoned union was held; the party saw the extensive influence his wit and convivial humour bad in fociety, and made many direct overtures to silence him; but the Captain being an independent man, and apparently warmed and animated in the beit of caufes, no progrets

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Yesterday about one o'clock, the Honourable Charles James Fox addressed Lord Hood, and made a proposal for closing the poll at two o'clock, on a report being generally circulated, that the unfortunate widow of the peace officer, murdered on Monday laft, was determined (contrary to the opinion of her friends, and utterly against the opinion of every person in the house where he died) to bury her husband at the uluval time of clofing the poll, in the Church-yard of St. Paul, Covent Garden, which propofition was immediately affented to by the other candidates; and as many false reports have been circulated, that the friends of Lord Hood and Sir Cecil Wray are at the expence. of the funeral, the public may rest assured, that every offer of service that has been made to the widow of the deceased, that might in any manner alleviate her unhappy ftate, has been rejected, she being in tuch good circumstances in life, as render every thing of the kind unnecessary.

It is understood that the principal reason of the body being buried in the above church-yard (whereas the deceased lived in Wapping) is at the fole will of the widow, The having a nephew already buried in that ground.

The audacious and unwarrantable attempts that have been made by the scandal advertisements and hand bills, in order to induce the public to attribute to the t;: of Lord Hood and Sir Cecil Wray the cause of the several riots and acts of cruolo have been committed during the Election for Westminster, and particularly : voked riot and cruel murder on Monday last, are too gross, and the cont. affertions too well known to stand in need of contradiction. The curii. of Mr. Fox's Committee at the Shakespeare, and the hand-bills ftuck up's ally distributed about the town on Tuesday, in order to bring back to affáir of St. George's Fields, appear on the very face of them to be s purpose of inflaming the minds of the people, and of creating r..

Their pretended offers of rewards, and advertising for evidence are unless they intend by it to buy oif and fuppress any evidence against their hireling butchers.

The Scrutiny promised for Westminster, and which will undou. lay open, it is generally believed, such scenes of the most ab., muft for ever dilgrace the opposite party. They were open enou fufficiently culpable; but others, ftill more heinous than thot. curtain. If, therefore, those dark things are brought to ligh!, ! meet the just rewards of their crimes, we may naturally hope, i ment or other, to get happily rid of the farther intrigues of : business of whose public conduct it has ever been to trample rights of individuals, and disturb the peace of society..

The conduct of Mr. Fox (says a correspondent) upon the i archetype of the powers, abilities, and the system of conduce whole of his public character :

To confound and puzzle, to perplex and confuse the under notions of right and wrong, is the peculiar faculty of the granu

Let any man see whether this is not the case, by an attentivi specimen of his boasted eloquence: No information, no clea an aptitude to twist and torture a fact, to worry the undert? and pervert and misrepresent truth to answer his own purpose.

The principle of his conduct has been the fame as his on Mond.y:

What is the plain matter of fact? A riot vened, the civil power is ftrengthened by a

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