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Much rather than come in the fame pair of sheets,

With fuch a coarse huge piece of lumber,
By G-d I'd consent to lie in the streets,
All night in the month of December.

Then let, &c.
But who is that Doctor kicks up such a dust,

And for Hood and WRAY roars like a Stentor?
Sure the great Lord Mahon has not lungs inore robust,
And can hardly be much eloquenter.

Then let, &c.
Would you think it, my boys, it's C-h-ll the Quack,

The chymist and apothecary,
Who now, like Sir Cecil, on FOX turns his back,
And becomes his avow'd adversary.

Then let, &c.
The stone that to gold turns all things at will,

It is well known that chymists will crave, Sir,
But gold it is plain can with easier skill,
The chymist turn into a knave, Sir.

Then let, &c.
But see how superbly all over the town,

Drawn along in a fine gilded chariot,
N -'s Duke rattles up street and down,
A bribing for Judas Iscariot.

Then let, &c.

Old Hugh is most gracious to all that he meets,

And tips ev'ry lodger a wink, Sir,
Tho' he leaves fifty beggars to starve in the streets,
A bad vote gets a guinea to drink, Sir.

Then let, &c.

To the will of the Court we are told to consent,

And never to do as we please, Sir,
If we vote against FOX we're forgiven our rent,
Or else we must forfeit our lease, Sir,

Then let, &c.
Thus of freedom and rights poor Electors they chouse,

Such flaves and fuch fools we are grown, Sir,
We must vote a Rogue into the Parliament House,
Or else be turn'd out of our own, Sir.

Then let, &c.

LIBERTY

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LIBERTY ELECTED; or, FOX in TRIU V PH.

NOW Liberty's Champion in triumph he comes,
Exalted, applauded, what shouts of the throng;

Huzza! huzza! to brave Fox now huzza !
It enlivens the heart of each true British foul,
So chair hiin all day, and at night quaff a bowl,
And toast Freedom and Fox in a bumper,

A bumper to Charly, huzza !
Such a strong opposition there never was known),
A hungry cur, always will snarle for the bone;

Huzza! huzza! &c,
To scrutinize now they are begging, I hear,
To support the poor Knight that locks up the small beer.
So Freedom and Fox in a bumper,

A bumper to Charly, huzza !
Charm'd with Fox's merit, then Via'ry flew down,
Our hero, the fav'rite of freedom, to crown.

Huzza! huzza ! &c.
Surrounded with laurel, with feat ever green,
And wreaths of fine flowers, our champion is seen.
So Freedom and Fox in a bumper,

A bumper to Charly, huzza !
Thus the victor in triumph he hastens along,
Each window is crowded, and multitudes throng.

Huzza! huzza ! &c.
You'd think that the air it would rend with applause,
Since Charly with honour has got through the cause.
Then Freedom and Fox in a bumper,

A bumper to Charly, huzza!
Not one in the Senate so able to sit,
As that man who has eloquence, honour, and wit.

Huzza! huzza ! &c.
Fox he is the man, and we'll on him depend,
He'll not starve an old soldier to serve his own end
Then Freedom and Fox in a bumper,

A bumper to Charly, huzza!

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To Mr. C. J. FOX.-By a FRENCHMAN.

OH puisse tu, le Ciceron de l'Angleterre,
Par Westminster etre elu de nouveau :
Vu ton patriotisme et fi noble et fi fier,
Le vray Anglois attend d'eux ce cadeau.

Th

The DUCHESS ACQUITTED: Or, The True Cause of the MAJORITY on the

WESTMINSTER ELECTION.

SOME strive to wound the virtuous name
Of De-re's, Dunn's fame,

Those beauteous, peerless pair;
And all the toiling earneft throng,
Let's celebrate in tuneful song,

The brunette and the fair.

When charms conspire, and join their aid,
What mortal man is not afraid?

Who can unmov'd remain ?
What heart is safe, whose vote secure,
When urg'd by the refiftless pow'r

Of Venus and her train ?

Let Slander, with her haggard eye,
No more blafpheme with hideous cry

Th' indefatigable dame.
'Twas Venus in disguise, 'tis said,
These efforts thro' the town display'd,

And her's alone the blame.

Than beauty's force and mighty pow'r,
Than charms exerted ev'ry hour,

What greater cause of fear?
Firm resolution melts away,
At beauty's so superior sway,

And Falsehood seems as fair.

The heart that still retain'd love's fire,
Unchill'd by age, warm with desire,

Could not resist their sway;
'Twas this rais'd Fox's numbers higher,
This did the tardy votes inspire-

Ah! poor Sir Cecil Wray!
Some say false arts and base chicane;
Some Spitalfields accufe in vain;

Who could have such withstood ?
Ev'n Wray himfelf, if so carefs'd,
The mighty influence had confess’d,

It own'd had been by Hood,
Let no one dare, with lips profane,
Fair De-n -re or others stain ;

The influence is divine.
The fault, if any, let them place
To Venus, her seductive grace,

And her redoubted shrine.

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Tune--Come, ye lads who wish to mine. COME, ye fons of Freedom, come,

Repair unto the banner,
Where Liberty erects her head,

And points the path of Honour.
Chuse my fav’rite FOX,” she cries,

" The Champion of Old Albion :
He always will protect our rights,

Against the Court's intrusion." Boldly push, the cause maintain,

Nor heed the threats of power,
For spirits firm and hearts of oak,

Will dare each adverse hour.
Then for FOX, my lads, huzza! &c.
What tho' new Peers like mushrooms rise,

T'attend Corruption's summons,
And Wilkes supports Prerogative,

To trample on the Commons.
Yet, steady, we'll for FOX huzza! &c.
Shall Judas, who betrays his friend,

E’er tax the fair to ruin?
Or gain his midnight back-stairs end,

Our freedom's fame undoing?
No-still for FOX we will huzza! &c.
Then Britons come, intrepid fouls,

Success crowns our endeavour,
For FOX, and LOVE and LIBERTY,

Shall be our theme for ever.
Huzza for FOX, my lads, huzza !

The Champion of Old Albion:
He always will protect our rights,

Against the Courts intrusion.

Te veniente diæ, te decente canebat.
WERE I to write, no man should grace the page,
But her's--the jewel of the present age;
In every fentence, and in every line,
The virtues of a Devonshire should shine;
That noble heroine, in prime of life,
The tender'it parent, and th' endearing wife!
With dignity as far as rank requires,
In mercy lib'ral, chafte in her defires;
Her eye ne'er swells with precedence of place,
Nor spurns at seeing others in disgrace;

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• te hare inferred the above stanzas merely for their well-meaning, and believe the writer, at the age of

" ye the vitues of a DEVONSHIRE!"

THAT your Petitioner, on mature reflection,
Most humbly conceives lie shall lose his Election,

And the expence being greater than he's able to bear, attection runs through the whole of the composition, and seems to lay with the Psalmist, « Old and young, praise

80, seems to have spoke from his heart. They are certainly inelegant, but a kind of patriarchal honesty and

The DUCHESS ACQUITTED: Or, The True CAUSE of the MAJORI"

WESTMINSTER ELECTION.
SOME strive to wound the virtuous name
Of De-n-re's, Dunn's fame,

Those beauteous, peerless pair;
And all the toiling earneft throng,
Let's celebrate in tuneful song,

The brunette and the fair.
When charms conspire, and join their
What mortal man is not afraid ?

Who can unmov'd remain ?
What heart is safe, whose vote se
When urg'd by the refiftlefs por

Of Venus and her trai
Let Slander, with her has
No more blafpheme with
Th’indefatigaby

give;
'Twas Venus in disg
These efforts thro'

ueclare,
And her's

fair : Than beauty's

approaching death,
Than charm

close my breath. *
W
Firm ref
At bez

Petition of Sir CECIL WRAY,
He fervently prays that you'll all pay a share
to Bankers, their names in the papers you'll find,
who the smallest donations to receive are inclin'd.
He wou'd not solicit fo much for your aid,
But fupplies must be had when a scrutiny's made;
Tho' his hopes are but flight to get fuch scrutineers,
And set aside numbers so great as appears,
Yet the money subscrib’d of great ule will be found,
And your Petitioner will pray, as in duty he's bound.

appy all.

SHEWITI,

The

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