ページの画像
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

" consolidate and perpetuate itself in
this country. This is the great ques-
tion, my countrymen, upon which
“ you have to exercise your judgment:
" this is the question, the solution of
" which will determine the fate of
“ England for ages to come.”
1 This was written in March, and on
the 21. March too, 1817. How clearly
the truth of it now appears! The taxes,

the unbearable taxes, are the cause of . . TO THE

all the turmoil. The titles, and all the af,

fairs of the church, might have remained READERS OF THE REGISTER.

undisturbed as completely as they did Bolt-court, 21. March, 1833.'

eighty or a hundred years ago. But MY FRIENDS,

the pressure of the taxes, falling at last How often have I told you, that " the so heavily on the working people, has " THING would lay furiously about it compelled men to look about them, to “as it approached its end !" How often find something to make give way;' and have I told you, that “ the THING the church has been an object that has * would at last expire in the hands of first presented itself. Hence, the present " the Whigs, whose greediness and im- disturbanees in Ireland; hence, also, " bgcoity conjoined, would push it on the approaching conflict in England; * t wond endurance !” These things hence, Sturges Bourne's Bills; and have I told you five hundred times hence, all the other projects for endeaover; and what do you think of the vouring to make the labouring people matter NOW? In my LEAVE-TAKING live upon potatoes ; and hence, the fires ADDRESS, when I went to Long Island, and all the calamities and disgraces. to escape the dungeons of Castlereagh amidst which we live,and the still greater and Sidmouth, I said this : “ The great ones amongst which we must live, unless " question now to be determined, is, this system of taxing be changed. I " whether the military and dungeon have said it a hundred times over, and I system can be carried on, after the repeat it here, that, whoever approves " paper system shall have been blowed of the present system of taxation, is a “up. I am quite sure, that the paperfool or is guilty of insincerity, if he

system will be blowed up in compa. blame the Ministers for the soldier 'and “ratively a few years : I am quite sure the dungeon system. Without military

of that: the question, therefore, is ; force and without dungeons, they can"not whether the paper system will be not carry on this system of taxation. " dessed; nor is it a question whe-The industrious classes present a mass "ther le soldier and dungeon system of indescribable ruin : the ruin increases " will continue as long as the taxing daily, and daily it must continue to in* system shall continue; for I know that crease until the system be changed ; “ it must ; I know, that it is impossible that is to say, until the burden of the “ to carry on the latter without the taxes be very greatly diminished. I de" former. But the grand and vital spise the man for his insincerity and fac. "question is, whether the taxing and tiousness, or I pity him for his imbe“soldier and dungeon system can sup- cility, if he call upon the Ministers to "port itself amidst the turmoil of the preserve to us the trial by jury and the "breaking up of the paper-system; and, laws of our fathers, and who at: he same " whether it can, after that, go on, and time votes for an expenditure of money

N

such as they are now compelled to meet." and provincial banks in the town The Ministers had to choose between of Athy, county of Kildare, where I taking off a great portion of the taxes," believe no branch of either establishand ruling us by sheer force. If they “ ment exists, so extreme was the panic had chosen the former, they might " yesterday, that some credulous and have effected their purpose with ease" foolish creatures exchanged il. notes and with equity; having chosen thes“ for seventeen shillings each. In all tatter, they must employ force. I can- " places where the run' has occurred, hot say that I expected them to do the " there has been a diminution to a conformer, or that I had any ground to "siderable amount in the prices of hope that they would do it; and, there- “ farming produce. In the west the fore, I am not at all surpriscd at the “ infuence of the run' has been alcourse they are now pursuing; for, in- " ready slightly felt, but the worst feadeed, they could pursue no other if they “ ture in the matter is connected with the meant to keep on the taxes. This course “ savings banks. The accounts from will be fatal to them in the end ; but, “ Limerick state that the artisans in in the meanwhile, it may be cfficient for “ that city have given notice for the their purpose, for a year or two ; and “ withdrawal of their deposits to some my readers, at any rate, will not, I “ extent. Never was there a more trust, be at all surprised, if they see " groundless and monstrous delusion Irish government attempted to he “ than that which now prevails respectintroduced into England, whenever "ing gold, nor one which was calcu. the necessity shall arise. The chances "s lated to produce more disastrous conare that the attempt would be defeated sequences to the people themselves. by some movement of the paper-money; " But the popular prejudice has been but, indeed, so many accidents arise in " excited and increased by an injudisuch a state of things, that it is utterly " cious advocacy of a sort of bank re. impossible to form anything like a fixed " striction to stop the run' by some opinion as to the precise manter in " of the Irish journals. This suggeswhich the end will approach us. In the “ tion, working upon ignorant minds, meanwhile, I earnestly caution my read- " induced a belief that all was not right ers to be prepared for the worst. The “ with the banks when they required THING will lay about it in a strange " such a protection. In the city of manner when it comes to its real agony. ** Dublin, where the people are more What every man should aim at, is, to "correctly informed upon the subject, keep, at all times, if possible, more or " there has been nothing weserving the less of gold safely in his pockets or " name of an increased demand upon his chests.

“ the banks." . · The run for gold in Ireland is only a This shows nothing but the foolishlittle beginning, a little specimen of ness of the writer. If he were not that which is to come. I insert the fol- foolish or insincere, he would know, and lowing article, as a little illustration as say, that no man can tell when a bank to this matter:

restriction may take place; that, when, “DUBLÍN, THURSDAY, March 14.-It erer it do take place, it must take place « appears by the accounts from various suddenly and without warning to any * parts of the south this morning, that body that it must be done by order in r the demand for gold has increased to council, and in all parts of the kingdom ** considerable extent. A political cause at one and the same moment; that the “ first produced it, but the farmers and pig-banks must be protected as well as “ small dealers now delude then selves the sow-bank; and that, every person * with a notion that the banks are un- having money deposited in any bank “ able to meet their engagements, and whatsoever, will lose, at the least, one “ they are, in ob tequence, pressing for- half of the real value of that money, at “ ward to ok na gold at the branch the first blow. That great statesman, “ establishme! both of the national Mr. Pease, was, apparently, not aware

Sir. .

of the effect of talking about a bank-re. "• knowledge, that such is the state of striction beforehand." I shall say no " 'trade in this great metropolis (hear, more upon this subject at present than " hear), and its immediate environs, merely to tell my readers what I myself " . and so unable are its inhabitants to do ; namely, never to sleep with a bank," pay these imposts--we say, my note in the house, and never to keep1"Lord, that it is our painful duty to one in the day-time, longer than during " state our firm conviction that these the time required to send it and get it " • taxes can no longer be collected. turned into gold. This is the safe way ; 1" (Hear, hear'). for though the Ministers will not resort " Lord ALTHORP said that he felt to an issue of assignats, if they can “ considerable difficulty in addressing avoid it, no man can tell to what a point " the meeting on this subject at the they will be pressed ; and for my part I “ present moment, although it was one think it likely enough that they will be which he had taken into his most se, pressed to this terrible point. The arti 1“ rious consideration, and looked upon cle which will follow this, will show to “ in all its different details, preparatory what a point they are already pressed ; “'to laying his financial statement beand to what a point the people are " fore Parliament. He had maturely ruined. After inserting the article, I “ considered the subject, and was aware will make some remarks on it. The “ of the difficulties by which it was reader will perceive that it is a subject “ beset, and all who heard him must be of monstrous importance. I beg the " aware that it would be most inconvereader to pay attention particularly to 1" nient, and indeed impossible for him, what is said about the bankruptcy of “ as a single member of his Majesty's Regent-street. I beg him to read the " Government, to decide upon the exwhole with the greatest attention ; and " pediency of repealing any particular then to be pleased to hear what I have " branch of taxation. He was afraid. to say upon the subject.

1 " therefore, that he could not give the “ Yesterday, at twelve o'clock, a nu |“ deputation a satisfactory answer as to " merous body of gentlemen, consisting" what course he should hereafter feel

of the members for the metropolitan " it his duty to pursue. He was aware “ districts, and of deputations from the " that this answer would not give sa: “ metropolitan parishes, waited upon the" tisfaction to the numerous body whom " Chancellor of the Exchequer, in " he had the honour to address (cries of “ Downing-street, for the purpose of " No, no); but filling the situation “impressing on him the necessity of

" which he filled, he was bound by “ repealing the whole of the assessed | " public duty, however numerous and " taxes. Amongst those present were " respectable might be the meeting, to “ -Sir F. Burdett, Mr. Byng, Mr. " confine his communication within “ Hume, Sir J. C. Hobhouse, Sir J. " those limits which were compatible « Key: Alderman Wood. Mr. Grote, Mr. " with his situation, as a confidential “ Briscoe, Mr. Hawes, Dr. Lushington, “ member of his Majesty's councils." “Mr. Tennyson, Major Beauclerk, Mr. “ Mr. E. Brown said, it had been “Goring, and Mr. D. W. Harvey, to “ stated that there had been no general “ gether with several gentlemen offi “ expression on the subject of these “ cially connected with the metropolis - taxes; but he would say, that if agi. and its environs.

f" tation were necessary to show the “Mr. CORDER, the vestry clerk of “ general feeling, he could command « St. Paul's Covent-garden, addressed“ plenty of it. The amount of assess “Lord Althorp at great length, and " ment for thelast year was 11,154,000l., “ argued on the oppressive character “ of which enormous sum that for the “ of the taxes in question. "My Lord, “ county of Middlesex alone amounted to " he said, in the course of his speech, |“ no less than 5,143,00 al. (Hear). Thus "it is the painful duty of this deputa-l" the metropolis agai' metropolitan * tion to state, from our own local " districts alone paidd we than half of

such as they are now compelled to meet.\" and provincial banks. In the town The Ministers had to choose between" of Athy, county of Kildare, where I taking off a great portion of the taxes, “ believe no branch of either establish and ruling us by sheer forcé. If they " ment exists, so extreme was the panic had chosen the former, they might " yesterday, that some credulous and have effected their purpose with ease “ foolish creatures exchanged ll. notes and with equity; having chosen the “ for seventeen shillings each. In all latter, they must employ force. I can-“ places where the run' has occurred, not say that I expected them to do the " there has been a diminution to a conformer, or that I had any ground to “ siderable amount in the prices of hope that they would do it; and, there-“ farming produce. In the west the fore, I am not at all surprised at the “ influence of the run' has been alcourse they are now pursuing; for, in- " ready slightly felt, but the worst feadeed, they could pursue no other if they “ ture in the matter is connected with the méant to keep on the taxes. This course “ savings banks. The accounts from will be fatal to them in the end; but, “ Limerick state that the artisans in in the meanwhile, it may be efficient for “ that city have given notice for the their purpose, for a year or two; and “ withdrawal of their deposits to some my readers, at any rate, will not, I “ extent. Never was there a more trust, be at all surprised, if they see “ groundless and monstrous delusion Irish government attempted to he“ than that which now prevails respectintroduced into England, whenever "ing gold, nor one which was calcu, the necessity shall arise. The chances "lated to produce more disastrous con are that the attempt would be defeated " sequences to the people themselves. by some movement of the paper-money, " But the popular prejudice has been but, indeed, so many accidents arise in " excited and increased by an injudisuch a state of things, that it is utterly " cious advocacy of a sort of bank reimpossible to form anything like a fixed “striction to stop the run by some opinion as to the precise manner in " of the Irish journals. This suggeswhich the end will approach us. In the “ tion, working upon ignorant minds, meanwhile, I earnestly caution my read. " induced a belief that all was not right ers to be prepared for the worst. The “ with the banks when they required THING will lay about it in a strange " such a protection. In the city of manner when it comes to its real agony. " Dublin, where the people are more What every man should aim at, is, to “ correctly informed upon the subject, keep, at all times, if possible, more or “ there has been nothing ucserving the less of gold safely in his pockets or " name of an increased demand upon his chests.

“ the banks." · The run for gold in Ireland is only a This shows nothing but the foolish. little beginning, a little specimen of ness of the writer. If he were not that which is to come. I insert the fol- foolish or insincere, he would know, and lowing article, as a little illustration as say, that no man can tell when a bank. to this matter :

restriction may take place'; that, when,“ DUBLIN, TAURSDAY, March 14. It erer it do take place, it must take place « appears by the accounts from various suddenly and without warning to any 46 parts of the south this morning, that body; that it must be done by order in " the demand for gold has increased to council, and in all parts of the kingdom 6 considerable extent. A political cause at one and the same moment; that the * first produced it, but the farmers and pig-banks must be protected as well as “ small dealers now delude theniselves the sow-bank; and that, every person w with a notion that the banks are un- having money deposited in any bank “able to meet their engagements, and whatsoever, will lose, at the least, one " they are, in ob tequence, pressing for half of the real value of that money, at ward to ok gold at the branch the first blow. That great statesman, “ establishme! Rypoth of the national Mr. Pease, was, apparently, not aware

Sirsi

[ocr errors]

of the effect of talking about a bank-re."knowledge, that such is the state of striction beforehand. I shall say no" trade in this great metropolis (hear.. more upon this sụbject at present than merely to tell my readers what I myself" ' and so unable are its inhabitants to do; namely, never to sleep with a bank," pay these imposts-we*** say, my note in the house, and never to keep". Lord, that it is our painful duty to one in the day-time, longer than during i" state our firm conviction that these the time required to send it and get it “ taxes can no longer be collected. turned into gold. This is the safe way ; "(Hear, hear'). for though the Ministers will not resort “ Lord Althorp said that he felt to an issue of assignats, if they can " considerable difficulty in addressing avoid it, no man can tell to what a point " the meeting on this subject at the they will be pressed ; and for my part I" present moment, although it was one think it likely enough that they will be " which he had taken into his most se. pressed to this terrible point. The arti- " rious consideration, and looked upon cle which will follow this, will show to

will follow this, will show to “ in all its different details, preparatory what ä point they are already pressed ; “'to laying his financial statement bes and to what a point the people are " foré Parliament. He had maturely ruined. 'After inserting the article, I “ considered the subject, and was aware will make some remarks on it. The “ of the difficulties by which it was reader will perceive that it is a subject “ beset, and all who heard him must be of monstrous importance. I beg the " aware that it would be most inconve. reader to pay attention particularly to “ nient, and indeed impossible for him, what is said about the bankruptcy of “ as a single member of his Majesty's Regent-street. I beg him to read the" Government, to decide upon the exwhole with the greatest attention; and pediency of repealing any particular then to be pleased to hear what I have branch of taxation. He was afraid. to say upon the subject.

" therefore, that he could not give the “ Yesterday, at twelve o'clock, a nu-“ deputation a satisfactory answer as to 6 merous body of gentlemen, consisting " what course he should hereafter feel

of the members for the metropolitan " it his duty to pursue. He was aware “ districts, and of deputations from the as that this answer would not give sa a metropolitan parishes, waited upon the “ tisfaction to the numerous body whom "Chancellor of the Exchequer, in

f the Exchequer. in " he had the honour to address (cries of Downing-street, for the purpose of “ No, no); but filling the situation « impressing on him the necessity of " which he filled, he was bound by “ repealing the whole of the assessed" public duty, however numerous and “ taxes. Amongst those present were " respectable might be the meeting, to " --Sir F. Burdett, Mr. Byng, Mr. " confine his communication within “ Hume, Sir J. C. Hobhouse, Sir J. * those limits which were compatible “Key, Alderman Wood, Mr. Grote, Mr. |" with his situation, as a confidential “ Briscoe, Mr. Hawes, Dr. Lushington, " member of his Majesty's councils. “Mr. Tennyson, Major Beauclerk, Mr. “Mr. E. Brown said, it had been " Goring, and Mr. D. W. Harvey ; to-l" stated that there had been no general “ gether with several gentlemen offi- " expression on the subject of these “ cially connected with the metropolis" taxes; but he would say, that if agi. « and its environs.

“ tation were necessary to show the .“ Mr. CORDER, the vestry clerk of " general feeling, he could command " St. Paul's Covent-garden, addressed “ plenty of it. The amount of assess “Lord Althorp at great length, and “ ment for thelast year was 11,154,000l., “ argued on the oppressive character " of which enormous sum that for the “ of the taxes in question. My Lord,' “ county of Middlesex alone amounted to " he said, in the course of his speech, " no less than 5,143,05 al. (Hear). Thus

• it is the painful duty of this deputa-1“ the metropolis agall metropolitan * tion to state, from our own local districts alone paid dwe than half of

[ocr errors]
« 前へ次へ »