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whether you have introduced all the words necessary for the full expression of your ideas; 8. whether you have repeated the same word in the same stnience, or in any sentence near it, and have thus been betrayed into a tautology (See Lesson XXII.) ; 9. whether you cannot divide some of your long sentences into shorter ones, and thereby better preserve the unity of the sentence (See Lesson XXXI.); and lastly, whether part or parts of your exercise may not be divided into separate paragraphs.

The following rules must also be observed.

1. No abbreviations are allowable in prose, and numbers (except in dates) must be expressed in words, not in figures.

2. "In all cases, excepting where despatch is absolutely necessary, the character &, and others of a similar nature, must not be used, but the whole word must be written out.

3. The letters of the same syllable must always be written in the same line. When there is not room in a line for all the letters of a syllable, they must all be carried into the next line; and when a word is divideá by placing one or more of the syllables in one line, and the remainder in the following line, the hyphen must always be placed at the end of the former line.

4. The title of the piece must always be in a line by itself, and should be written in larger letters than the exercise itself.

5. The exercise should be commenced not at the extreme left hand of the line, but a little towards the right. Every separate paragraph should also commence in the same way.

6. The crotchets or brackets which enclose a parenthesis should be used as sparingly as possible. Their place may often be supplied by commas.

Suggestions to Teachers with regard to the written exercises

of Students. 1. Examine the exercise in reference to all those points laid down in the directions for students in reviewing and cor recting their compositions. (See page 303.)

2. Merits for composition should be predicated on their neatness, correctness, (in the particulars stated in the direc tions to pupils, page 303), length, style, &c.; but the highest merits should be given for the strongest evidence of intellect in the production of ideas, and original sentiments and forms of expression.

3. Words that are misspelt, should be spelled by the whole class, and those words which are frequently misspelt should be recorded in a book kept for that purpose, and occasionally spelt on the slate by the class.

4. Keep a book in which the student may have the privilege to record such compositions as are of superior merit. This book should be kept in the hands of the teacher, and remain the permanent property of the institution. This will have an excellent effect, especially if additional merits are given for the recording of a composition.

5. A short lecture on the subject of the composition as signed to a class, showing its bearings, its divisions, and the manner in which it should be treated, will greatly facilitate their progress,

and interest them in the exercise. 6. Have a set of arbitrary marks, which should be explained and understood by the class, by which the exercise should be corrected. This is, in fact, nothing less than a method of short hand, and will save the trouble of much writing

7. Insist upon the point, that the exercise should be written in the student's best hand, with care, and without haste. For this purpose, ample time should always be allowed for the production of the exercise. A week at least, if not a fortnight, should intervene between the assigning and the requiring of the exercise. Negligence in the mechanical execution, will induce the neglect of the more important qualities.

8. Require the compositions to be written on alternate pages, leaving one page blank, for such remarks as may be suggested by the exercise, or for supplying such words or sentences as may have accidentally been omitted.

9. In correcting the exercises, care should be taken to preserve as much as possible the ideas which the pupil intended to express, making such alterations only as are neces. sary to give them clearness, unity, strength, and harmony, and a proper connexion with the subject, for it is the student's own idea which ought to be “ taught how to shoot.” An idea thus humored will thrive better than one which is not a native of the soil.

10. It is recommended that a uniformity be required in the size and quality of the paper of the exercises of the class

that the name (real or fictitious) of the writer, together with the date and number of the composition. be placed conspicuously on the back of the exercise. The writing should

ances.

be plain and without ornament, so that, no room bein, left for flourish or display, the principal attention of each student may be devoted to the language and the sentiments of his perform

It is also recommended, that the paper on which the exercise is written be a letter sheet folded once, or in quarto form, making four leaves or eight pages. This form is of use, especially in the earlier stages of his progress, because it enables him more easily to fill a page, and encourages him with the idea that he is making progress in his exercise. In the. writing of compositions, a task to which all students address themselves with reluctance, nothing should be omitted by the teacher, however trivial it may at first appear, by which he may stimulate the student to exertion.

11. Accommodate the corrections to the style of the student's own production. An aim at too great correctness may possibly cramp the genius too much, by rendering the student timid and diffident; or perhaps discourage him altogether, by producing absolute despair of arriving at any degree of perfection. For this reason, the teacher should show the student where he has erred, either in the thought, the structure of the sentence, the syntax, or the choice of words. Every alteration, as has already been observed, should differ as little as possible from what the student has written; as giving an entire new cast to the thought and expression will lead him into an unknown path not easy to follow, and divert his mind from that original line of thinking which is natural to him.

12. In large institutions, where a class in composition is numerous, the teacher may avail himself of the assistance of the more advanced students, by requiring them to inspect the exercises of the younger. This must be managed with great delicacy; and no allusion be allowed to be made out of the recitation room, by the inspector, to the errors or mistakes which he has discovered. He should be required to note in pencil, his corrections and remarks, and sign his own name (also in pencil) to the exercise under that of the writer, to show that he is responsible for the corrections. *

* Instead of a written exercise, the teacher may, with advantage, occasionally present to the student a piece selected from some good writer : requiring him to present a rhetorical analysis of the same This analysis should comprehend the following operations :

Parsing.
Panctuation.

be recorded in a book kept for that purpose, and occasionally spelt on the slate by the class.

4. Keep a book in which the student may have the privi. lege to record such compositions as are of superior merit. This book should be kept in the hands of the teacher, and remain the permanent property of the institution. This will have an excellent effect, especially if additional merits are given for the recording of a composition.

5. A short lecture on the subject of the composition as signed to a class, showing its bearings, its divisions, and the manner in which it should be treated, will greatly facilitate their progress, and interest them in the exercise.

6. Have a set of arbitrary marks, which should be explained and understood by the class, by which the exercise should be corrected. This is, in fact, nothing less than a method of short hand, and will save the trouble of much writing

7. Insist upon the point, that the exercise should be written in the student's best hand, with care, and without haste. For this purpose, ample time should always be allowed for the production of the exercise. A week at least, if not a fortnight, should intervene between the assigning and the requiring of the exercise. Negligence in the mechanical execution, will induce the neglect of the more important qualities.

8. Require the compositions to be written on alternate pages, leaving one page blank, for such remarks as may be suggested by the exercise, or for supplying such words or sentences as may have accidentally been omitted.

9. In correcting the exercises, care should be taken to preserve as much as possible the ideas which the pupil intended to express, making such alterations only as are necessary to give them clearness, unity, strength, and harmony, and a proper connexion with the subject, for it is the student's own idea which ought to be “ taught how to shoot.” An idea thus humored will thrive better than one which is not a native of the soil.

10. It is recommended that a uniformity be required in the size and quality of the paper of the exercises of the class - that the name (real or fictitious) of the writer, together with the date and number of the composition, be placed conspicuously on the back of the exercise. The writing should

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Want of Unity.

related

It was a beautiful evening, in the month of August, when
I alighted from my carraige, at the house of my friend in
the picturesque village of M. The broad and beautiful
bay lay stretched out with its calm and glossy bosom to the
west, while around me, in the distance might be seen little
cottages trees, and hills, forming a most beautiful scenery.
The setting Şun threw his golden beams upon the water,
which did not look now like the grave of human beings.

Tempted by the beauty of the evening, I took a walk along
the beach with my friend. During the conversation, he

remarked, if you please I will relate the account of a
shipwreck which happened here a short time ago. It was on
a night when the tempests seemed to be at war with
other, when

one of the vessels belonging to this port
might be

seen approaching the coast, making signals of
distress. Soon notwithstanding the severity of the weather
a considerable number were gathered on the beach, for there
were many expecting friends, and the fears they felt
for their safety together with their pity for the sufferers,
induced them to use every exertion for the safety of those
on board.

The night was such, that it would have been almost in stant death to have venturell upon the waters in an

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