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THE

POETICAL WORKS

ROGERS, CAMPBELL, J. MONTGOMERY,

LAMB, AND KIRKE WHITE.

COMPLETE IN ONE VOLUME.

PHILADELPHIA :
GRIGG, ELLIOT & Co.
NO. 14 NORTH FOURTH STREET.

1849.

Printed by T. K. & P. G. Collins.

COOLER - 1 NOV 1930

BRARY

THE

POETICAL WORKS

OF

SAMUEL ROGERS.

Contents.

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MEMOIR OF SAMUEL ROGERS....

XIV. An Adventure. ....

XV. Naples ..........

THE PLEASURES OF MEMORY ..

XVI. The Bag of Gold ...

Notes .............

XVII. A Character ......

HUMAN LIFE .............

XVIII. Sorrento ..........

Notes ...........

XIX. Påstum. .........

AN EPISTLE TO A FRIEND..

XX. Monte Cassino ..

Notes ...............

XXI. The Harper .......

XXII. The Felucca .....

JACQUELINE..

XXIII. Genoa .........

THE VOYAGE OF COLUMBUS ....

XXIV. A Farewell ..........

Notes ..................

Notes and Illustrations to "Italy"...... ib

ITALY:

MISCELLANEOUS POEMS:

Part I. I. The Lake of Geneva ..

II. The Great St. Bernard .

...41

Ode to Superstition ......

Verses written to be spoken by Mrs. Siddons

III. The Descent .......

- asleep .......

IV. Jorasse ..........

To -

V. Marguerite de Tours . .

From Euripides ....

VI. The Alps ........

VII. Como ...........

Captivity :......

VIII. Bergamo .........

The Sailor ......

IX. Italy ..........

To an Old Oak ......

X. Coll' alto .........

To Two Sisters. .....

On a Tear ...........

XI. Venice ...

XII. Luigi .........

To a Voice that had been lost. ...

From a Greek Epigram .......

XIII. St. Mark's Place ...

XIV. The Gondola......

To the Fragment of a Statue of Hercules,

commonly called the Torso. ...

XV. The Brides of Venice

To

XVI. Foscari ...,

Written in a Sick Chamber .....

XVII. Arqua ....

XVIII. Ginevra ..

The Boy of Egremond.....

XIX. Bologna ....

To a Friend on his Marriage ....

The Alps at Day-break .......

XX. Florence ...

XXI. Don Garzia .......

Imitation of an Italian Sonnet...

A Character .............

XXII. The Campagna of Florence

To the Youngest Daughter of Lady

PART II. I. The Pilgrim .......

Epitaph on a Robin Red-breast ..

II. An Interview ......

To the Gnat .............

III. Rome. ..........

A Wish ....

IV. A Funeral ........

Written at Midnight, 1786 ......

V. National Prejudices ...

Italian Song .........

VI. The Campagna of Rome

Inscription ..................

VII. The Roman Pontiffs . . .

Written in the Highlands of Scotland, Sep-

VIII. Caius Cestius ......

tember 2, 1812 ..............

IX. The Nun ...........

A Farewell .......

..... 97

X. The Fire-fly ......

Inscription for a Temple dedicated to the

XI. Foreign Travel ...

Graces ................... i

XII. The Fountain .....

To the Butterfly ............... 18

XIII. Banditti ...... .

Written in Westminster Abbey, Oct. 10,1806 ib

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There seems to be something so repugnant to the pursuits of literature in habits of trade and eommerce, that the instances have been very rare in which they have been combined in one individual. The historian of the Medici, and Rogers the Poet, are almost solitary instances of literary taste and talent being united harmoniously with traffic. Samuel Rogers is a bay.ker in London, and has been for many years at the head of a most respectable firm. His father followed the same business before him, and amassed considerable wealth, both which became the heritage of the Poet, who was born about the year 1762, in London; but little or nothing is known of the way in which he passed his early years. His education was liberal, no cost having been spared to render him an accomplished scholar. That he improved by thought and reflection upon the lessons of his youth, there can be no doubt; and, it is to be presumed, he lost no opportunity of reaping profit from the extraordinary advantages which his station obtained for him. He always kept the best society, both as respected rank and talent, the circle of which in the metropolis of England in his younger days was more than commonly brilliant. His political ideas are what are styled liberal, and no one has ever been able to reproach him with the abandonment of a single principle with which he originally set out in life. Over most of his early friends and companions the grave has now closed, and they included among them inany great

names. With a strong attachment for the Muses, after the excellent education Rogers received, it is not surprising that he ventured before the public. His first work was an “Ode to Superstition, and 3ther Poems,” which appeared in 1786. This was followed by a second publication, “The Pleasures of Memory,” when he had passed the greenness of youth, having attained his thirtieth year. In 1792 this poem was received by the public with universal applause. The subject was happily chosen, coming home to the business and bosoms of all; it was executed with great care,

and various passages display uncommon felicity. As a whole, perhaps its chief defect is that it wants vigor, but the deficiency in this quality is made up in correctness and harmony. Rogers is one of the most scrupulous of the sons of the lyre in his metre, and he too often sacrifices that harshness which sets off the smoother passages of a writer's works, and prevents sameness and monotony, to mere cold purity of style. Perhaps no poem of equal size ever cost its author so many hours to produce. Not satisfied with his own corrections, he repeatedly consulted the taste of some of his friends; one of the most devoted of whom, Richard Sharpe, then a wholesale hatter, and since Member of Parliament,' has said that, before the publication of this poem, and while preparing the successive editions for press, they had read it together several hundred times, at home as well as on the Continent, and in every temper of mind that varied company and varied scenery could produce. In the year 1798, Rogers published “An Epistle to a Friend, with other Poems,” and in 1812 “The Voyage of Columbus.” Two years after wards, in conjunction with Lord Byron, or rather printed in the same volume with Byron's Lara, appeared his tale of “Jacqueline;” a poem which displays a strange contrast to the fire and energy of the author of Manfred. Sweet and pleasing rather than striking, “Jacqueline,” though well received, contributed little to increase its author's reputation. “Human Life,” next to the Pleasures of Memory, is the most finished production of Rogers. The subject was a good one, for it was drawn from universal nature, and connected with all those rich associations which increase in attraction as we journey onwards in the path of life. It is

1 This gentleman has carried the art of brilliant and interesting conversation to an unprecedented degree of perfection, having in fact reduced it to a matter of mere business, as systematic as Book-Keeping. He keeps on index to his multitudinous commonplace books; and has a debtor and creditor account with his different circles of the jokes let off or the set speeches made.

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