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Although ever so preoccupied with his I found it."-The right owner, in a transtroubles, our youth, on entering the coach, | port of joy and of admiration, clasped the felt a something rolling under his feet, | knees of his benefactor : "Ah! Sir," said which, on picking up, he found to be a he, a nioment after, " I beg you will inbox, with a very rich lid. : When he had || for me to whom I am obliged for a serreached his home, he examined the trea vice of this nature, and in what manner I sure wbich chance had thus thrown in his could manifest my gratitude:"-"To that way. It proved to be a casket partly filled || I renounce every claim; I am, if I flatter with diamond ornaments, and at the bot: not myself too much, above accepting of a tom of which a drawer had been managed remuneration : my name is Jacibald." I that contained bank-notes to the amount of have had the pleasure of knowing your eight thousand pounds. These riches, father for years, and am no stranger to the thought George, most certainly belong to misfortunes that he has encountered. You the old gentleman who fell out of the coach. are the worthy son of a respectable father, If he be still alive, what must his inquie- || With regard to myself, I am a 'widower, tude be! I must go to-morrow and ivquire | left with an only daughter; allow ber to after him. Then, casting his eyes aniew

share with you the property you have just on the whole, “Alas!" exelaimed he, with returned, to which I shall add as much a sigh,“ how happy could I live with my more in case you accept of the proposals. Sophia, if I was possessed of this wealth!" On account of some family broils, which

At an early hour the next morning he have only been settfed for a few days past, repaired to the surgeon's. The old gentle she has been made acquainted this mornman was not dead, but he could not being, for the first time with the name of her spoken to as he was just gone to rest: Till father.” Then, raising his voice, i" Come such time as he awakes, said George, let me in my girl," said the old gentleman.

go and see Sophia. But, when I weet her, From an adjacent room instantly rushed ! when od witness her tears upon being in- lf in the very identical Sophia, in wlrose fasuformed that we must part for ever, how do | 'vour young Jacibald was so affectionately ...I know I shall be endowed with sufficient i prepossessed. The surprise of the two " fortitude not to think of the treasure I found lovers alove prevented them from 'flying *l yesterday. Most shocking idea! can I into each other's arms; yet it no sooner

question my own honour ? When he ask- subsided, to make room for emotions of a "...ed for Sophia, he was told that she had more tender nature, than Mr. Richardson,

been sent for at day-break, and was not yet (Sophia's father), addressing George, said returged. " !

to him, with a smile, “ Although you have He therefore proceeded back to the sur not answered me yet, I believe I can read geon's, and as he urged the necessity of his in your looks that you agree to my propo. speaking to the invalid about business of sition, and I coligratulate myself that the essential-importance, he was immediately husband l'had prepared for my Sophia brought to his bed-side." Sir," said he, 'l is the same whom her heart had fixed * pray tell me, did you not leave a casket upon." in the coach, from a fall of which you met Mr. Jacibald was overjoyed at his son's with your accident?"-" Alas! Sir," re• | good fortune; peither was he much less plied the other, “I bave lost a box con pleased with the circumstance whence it taining diamonds to the amount of twenty originated. The marriage ceremony was thousand pounds, besides eight thousand performed as soon as a license could be in bank-notes."_“You have lost nothivg, procured; and the young couple, for a Sir," resumed the youth ; "bere is your series of years, lived in uninterrupted happroperty, which I feel happy to restore as piness.

FILIAL DISOBEDIENCE

THE HAPPIEST NUPTIALS IMBITTERED BY FILIAL DISOBEDIENCE;

AN HISTORICAL TALE.

Charles V. Emperor of Germany, on their deliverer. The high-wrought attended by his officers of the highest rank transports of the enfranchised captives, in the armament, which sailed from Cag, and the ardent sympathy of their liberators, liari on the 16th of July, 1535, having com had not subsided, when a train of camels pelled Tunis to surrender at discretion, excited new feelings of mingled astonishhastens through all quarters of the city, ment and curiosity. A lady, casting away seeking, by remonstrances and threats, to the boughs of foliage that screened her restrain the violence and rapacity of his from the sun, threw up her veil, and, in victorious troops ; but their basest passiops the English dialect, intreated for admission prevail against subordination-thirty thou. to the royal presence. An officer who unsand Moors and Arabs are massacred, and derstood her language, communicated this ten thousand reserved for worse than death || supplication : the Emperor commanded him in the mines of South America. To the | to lead her and her companions within the atrocities of a few hours, the natives still circle of his lords in waiting, and he to act ascribe that vengeance of Divine Provi. as interpreter. The camels and their load dence, which, in the third African expedi, | were committed to safe custody, and the tion of the Spaniards, and the second of travellers dismounted, and obeyed the imtheir sovereign, ordained the wreck of fif- il perial mandate. The elder Jady took the teen ships of war and one hundred and fifty arm of her male companion, and the other transports, with the loss of eight thousaud sylph-like figure, covered with a drapery men, in the fathomless ocean; and thou-flowing from her head to the ground, walksands, after gaining the shore, were slaugh-led on the other side. They approached tered by the vindictive retribution of the the royal pavilion with genuflections... Tunisian populace. The soldiery had, in- Charles desired the veiled lady to shew her deed, perpetrated horrible cruelties, but face; and as she did not instantly comply, their superiors spared no exertion to rescue a gay officer attempted to draw aside the the victims. Charles, with his own hand, gauze ; but the young stranger kneeling inflicted several flesh wounds on the most beside her darted a look of lofty displeas) daring leaders of his plundering murder. sure, and, in whispers, persuaded the tremo ous legiovs, in hopes of intimidating the bling fair to permit him to fulfil the Em rest; but the officers, comparatively few, peror's command. A murmur of admira-1 were unable to enforce their orders. The tion passed along the assemblage, on be Emperor, in grief and indignation, dashed holding a form and features is where the to the ground his ensanguined weapon; expression of intellectual dignity redeemed and the officers, of all degrees, stood in sad sweet timidity from the charge of imbecile silence, ashamed of nominally commanding softness. The Emperor rose, and giving a a host of ruffians. Their faces, hands, and hand to each lady, conducted them within uniforms, bore bloody evidences of recent the pavilion. The matron wished again to warfare; their chargers seemed to have kneel, and the lovely girl, who watched waded amidst rivers of gore; and their her every movement, followed her example; downcast aspect might belong, not to vic-) but Charles prevented them, and waved tory, but to defeat. Imprecations, menaces, his band to the youth, declining a repeated screams, and groans, filled the air. The act of homage, Looking pleasantly on his tumult was hushed a few moments, and officers, the Emperor said: joyful acclamations spread nearer and more “We are, to-day, no more than the Gew

Twenty-five thousand, Christian nerals and subalterns of a disobedient slaves, the brave men who, imprisoned in army; and as all have undergone much the citadel, had burst their fetters, and fatigue, so all should be seated, and this! turned the artillery of the ramparts against || lady will honour us with some account of k. the oppressors, now threw themselves at the purport of her journey." the feet of Charles, pouring forth blessings The interpreter imparted the monarch's

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behest. The lady threw herself at the feet recurred in a few days. My husband and of Charles, exclaiming :

I attended him. While he lay lielpless, “Mighty Emperor! Au undutiful daugh. || two of the desperate marauders that iufest ter, a hideously criminal wretch, licks the the woods, undermined our cottage, at a dust before thee. There is blood upon the subdivision remote from Achmet's chamhands beld up imploring protection for herber, and, with noiseless step, had entered innocent offspring."

ere we suspected their vicinity. Robberies The youthful beauty had prostrated her. are so frequent, that all dwellings are proself, in imitation of her parent, and forget- vided with means for prompt defence in ful of all her bashiful apprehensions, said, these barbarous states: and my husband with charming simplicity :

instantaneously seized a loaded carbine, “ Most gracious Lord Emperor! My mo taking an aim so sure, that the first villain ther is all goodness. She shed no blood, | fell, never to rise, close to Achmet's bed. but the blood of a ruffian, who would have || The other strided towards it, as Achmet, killed my dear father."

roused by the discharge of fire-arms, leaped A deep glow suffused the cheeks of the

up to offer resistance; but the courage of a maiden, and tears trickled fast as she spoke. | most manly mind must yield to personal The Emperor raised her and her mother, || debility: he sunk on the ground. I had a and the most profound silence pervaded the

pair of pistols ready for Godfrey, but before multitudinous audience, while Mrs. God-hecould employ either, his adversary lodged frey resumed her narration :

a ball in his thigh, which he repaid by "My father possessed large estates, which | breakiug the left arm of the renegado with were destined for me, on condition of givm || bis shot. I could not use a pistol, but I ivg my band to the next heir; but my || bad unsheathed a sabre; and when I saw affections were early rivetted upon a gen my husband grappling with a ruthless misteman, of great accomplishments and creant, and observed him drawing a cut-' worth, though of small fortune. My father || lass from his girdle, 'I sprung upon him absolutely interdicted me from seeing him with the murderous steel. I had no deli, He resolved to leave England for ever; berate purpose of taking his life-but, alas! and, in the phirenzy of love, I consented to the point penetrated tris heart. Oh! his plight' my faith at an altar, sacrilegiously dying look can never be effaced from my stained with parental tears. My Godfrey memory. Day and night his distorted, fecarried Ime iminediately on board the ship rocious eyes, seem fixed upon me.” where he had taken a passage, intending *God and man acquit you, lady," said to comunence business with his uncle, a rieb | the Emperor. All present echoed the royal bankers of Genoa." But heaven chastised sentence, but Mrs. Godfrey mournfully reour onfilial self-indulgence. The rocky coast of north-western Italy could be seen Il cannot acquit myself. If I had not only at a great distance, 'when a Barbary disobeyed my parents, I should not be corsair boarded our unarmed sloop, and placed in circumstances that reduced me to took us to Algiers. The pirates attempted the dreadful alternative of having my hus. to separate me from my husband, when'ar. band butchered' before me, or imbruing ranging the captives for sale; but clioging my hands in the blood of a fellow.creature, with agonizing grasp, we vowed to perish and sending him to eternity with all his sios together. A venerable Turk, of high qua- | unrepented_unrenounced. When the freelity, had come to take the first choice of the booter, with a frightful malediction, tore slaves, and pitying our anguish, purchased | the sabre from his side, and the vital stream, us at a brigh price. He exempted us from weltering as he lay, came warm over my all drudgery but domestic cares; and though || feet, where I bandaged my husband's inexpert in household offices, Achmet al wound, I felt as though the current of life lowed our assiduity and strict honour aton froze in every vein and artery. The feeled for deficiency in servile adroitness. Our ing was momentary. I caught a glimpse fidelity was proven at the utmost hazard. of the empurpled blade directed at GodAchmet removed to a country-louse for frey, and wrenched it from the expiring the recovery of his health ; but the fever wretch. Achmet required my aid, and 1

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had just raised him into his couch, when || insults offered by barbarians to their regal the Moors; appointed to watch in the ves-honour, and the injuries inflicted on their tibule, appeared. They clamourously la- subjects-injuries, compared to which the mented the catastrophe their vigilance extinction of animat vitality would be a should have prevented. I sent one of them merciful doon. Achmet treated us to call a slave, skilled in surgery, to extract | friends--but still we weré slaves; and his the ball from my husband's thigh. I had, death might transfer us to a harsh master, iu some measuré, staunched the effusion of With what bitterness of sout have I looked blood with a part of my dress, and he was upon my son, born to no inheritance except able to inform me surgical assistance would bondage! He died in six months, and I bebe necessary. He soon recovered ; and wailed him as though he had been heir to a the success of his French slave in curing diadem. My father's curse, and the curse of Godfrey, induced Achmet to follow his pre- the robber uttered in his last words, hauntscriptions, which in a short time removed led my imagination : and I afflicted my hus. bis malady, and he rewarded the old man band by incessant monodies, in our short with emancipation, The French surgeon intervals of privacy. Kind, gentle, and took his passage for Europe. I wrote a noble-minded, he tried to soothe and cheer penitential letter to my father, imploring | me, by urging that if we were rash, my him to ransom me, and the father of a child parents were arbitrary--and in stabbing which we soon expected: but years of toil the robber I performed an aet of conjugal and sorrow had worn down the old man's heroism, and saved the delinquent from exconstitation-he died before the vessel set piating his crimes by lingering tortures. sail, aud with him died all my hopes of re Reason assented to those palliations yet demption from slavery. Oh! why are the distempered sensibility obtained froin them rulers of civilized realms so callous to the no permanent relief; and while a morbid most dire of human calamities? Why do wayward spirit aggravated each distress, they expend lives in combating for increase terrible evils were impending." of territory, or commercial or political (To be concluded in our next.) supremacy, and remain passive beneath the

FUGITIVE POETRY.

Poetic Impressions. By Henry Lee. One All the company titter'd-young Turf cried, Volume 12mo. Sherwood, Neely, and

elate, Jones.

"Well, the heat I have gain'd, tho' it seems lost

the plate.!" These fugitive pieces are mingled with

PITY AN ORNAMENT TO BEAUTY. some very familiar and domestic IMPRES

“ The brightest gems but cloud that face sions made by the Washing Day, Ironing Where Love a spoiless beaven can trace ! Day, Quarter Day, and Saturday. The For how should art, or borrow'd rays, author is vot unknown in the literary Add splendor to the solar blaze ? world ; and as a work like this before us is one jewel ouly Love can prize almost impossible to analyze, we shall

'Tis Pity's pearl in Beacty's eyes!" merely present the following extracts to

IRONING DAY. our readers :

“ An ironing-day's an iron age to me Too sad a trnth, altho''tis irony !

A thousand ills my heated frame environ, “ Once at tea with some ladies, a Newmarket | Whene'er I'm ruffled by a smoothing iron! 'Squire

My pen I snatch and try to write plain prose, Rose to hand round the toast which was placed Some burning tag-rag staff offends my bose; at the fire

For purer air I'm each apartment seeking, But the touch burnt his fingers-he stamp'd and But noxious vapours every wbere are reeking! he swore,

Put to strange shifts, and numerous shifts while And then quitting his hold, dropt the whole on trying,

[drying. the floor :

I'm shiv'ring wet, when all things round are

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'Tis worse, far worse, than standing with bare Ah no! --but if by ills aggrieved, feet

'Tis added pain to he deceived ; At Christmas, doing penance in a sheet! And when by love and fortune crost, I pace the garden, heavy as a sledge,

'Tis nearest bliss to know the worst, * Linen (as Falstaff says) on every hedge.'

Did Julia say sbe conld not love,
There fringed curtains waft like clouds in air, 'Twould still a mark of kindness prove.
Each ruffled shirt's ' a revell'd sleeve of care." For candour, which the heart alarms,
Vainly I muse on poesy divine,

Adds greater worth to female charms;
A disinal gloom is thrown o'er erery line, It notes a rectitude replete,
Winds as they blow, loug trains of terror spread, | A detestation of deceit.
Frill'd caps and gown-tails flapping 'gainst my If man enslave the female mind,
head!

It only leads as he's inclined ;
My path-way's stopt to find the track is puzz The difference, then, not wide would seem
ling-

'Twixt me and those who vainly dream: I'm elasp'd by calicoe, or wrapt in muslin! And thus the case-a few words show it Walking, I stoop to 'scape the flying evils, The mind's the same but I best know it." Where long-prong'd sticks stand up like forked

devils ! Each holly-bush, tall shrub, or painted post,

Another little interesting Poem has ape A pallid spectre seems or green-eyed ghost! peared from the same writer; which proves From bouglis suspended, bodied gowns I sce, that his heart is in onison 'with his head : As if a Baterpan hung on 'every tree!

the one is well stored with learning's treaMy bouse once more I enter-all annoys, Throwing, as 'twere, wet blankets o'er my joye: der feelings of humanity; and “the mer

sures, the other seems replete with the tenI dare not speak-am told the work it hindersTo lend a band were but to burn my fingers.

ciful man is merciful to his beast." This Tormented thus, of life itself I tire,

Poem is entitled Dash-a village doy, whose Plagued with so many irons in the fire!" fidelity to his master is enough to cause SATURDAY.

every summer friend to hide his head. “ la glowing terms I would the day indite,

Some admirable reflections are mingled in (Its morn, its noon, its afternoon, and night) this pleasing little effusion on the conduct The busiest day throughout the week--the latter which the humane and good man ever obo day;

serves towards the brute creation, and with A day whereon odd matters are made even;

which we commence our extracts. The dirtiest-cleanest too of all the seven ; The sconring-pail, pan, plate, and platter day: « The humblest bird that near a cottage comes, A day of general note and notability,

Is ever welcome to a kind man's crumbs. A plague to gentlefolks

All things above him, bis reflections trace, And prim gentility,

And all below, his sympathies embrace ; E'en to the highest ranksnobility!

Glad to protect, relieve-it ne'er annoy; And yet a day (barring all jokes)

He feels for all that suffer or enjoy ; Of great utility,

Will smile with these for those a tear can shed, Both to the rich as well as the mobility, Nor op a worm e'er willingly would tread” A day of din-of clack-a clatter day: For all, howe'er they mince the matter, say, The day they dread,

“ The rough o’erhanging rock was high and (A day with hippish, feverish, frenzy fed)

sleep, Is that grand day of fuss and bustle, Saturday!"

Yet Dasli between the clefis would fearless creep. CANDOUR.

At length the top he gain'd, and joy pourtay'd, “ What, love excepted, charms mankind? Run, jump'd, and bark'd-then howl'd again for An bonest, generous, candid mind.

aid; The love I valne scorns control,

Look'd down and whined, as if the path he'd Its flame the impulse of the soul!

sbow, If this my Julia cannot show,

And, sorrowing, heard his master groan below! It is bat jnst to tell me so.

The waters, gathering from ile veighbouring As fancy dictates, thoughts will range,

grounds, Our feelings, inclinations change:

In torrents rush'ı-o'erfow'd the quarry's The heavenly mandate how withstand ?

bounds! Wherefore oppose its high command ?

A marly substance, loosened by the flood, Why stamp with blame the heart that's free, Was driven, and fell, where wretched Woodley Seeking its own affinity?

stuod : Think not that hence i Julia slight,

Or rather where he clung-how could be stand, Or hold denr woman's preference light.

So insecure bis footiog ou the suud! No. 110.-Vol. XVIII.

Ff

ACCIDBNT WHICH BEFEL DASH AND HIS

MASTER.

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