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LA BELLE ASSEMBLÉE;

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF DIS.

TINGUISHED

Topographical Museum.

11

AND

ILLUSTRIOUS Sandwich

................. 10

CHARACTERS.

Canterbury

ib,

Miss Clara Fisher.

Deal

12

Early talents of Miss Fisher

The Chieftain's Daughter.-A Tale.

Unbounded applause bestowed on them ib.

Feudal magnificence

12

Her peculiar excellence in Lord Flimnap and

Beauty of Imina

..... 13

Richard III. ......

ib.

Ancient challenge

ib.

Love triumphant

15

ORIGINAL COMMUNICATIONS.

Depreciation of Benefits ; in a Letter from

Rousseau

15

A brief History of Music, selected from the

Lisguise and no Disguise.-A Tale.

best Authorities.

A young Widow's resolution

...... 19

Music of France and Italy before the fifteenth The Chevalier de Rabar falls in love with her

Century

Picture ....

.......... ib.

Anecdotes of Illustrious Females. Stratagem of friendship

......... 21

Mrs. Delaney

5 Instance of Perseverance and Resolution.

Mrs. Bennet

6 Timely repentance on taking Monastic vows 92

Historical and Select Anecdotes.

Feigned madness

ib.

Incideat in the life of Abbe La Caille

6

The Gleaner's Porte-Folio.

Particulars of Dr. Johnson's Marriage ib, Paris in 1643 and 1644

22

relative to Bonaparte

7 Iniproper treatment of Prisoners

................. 27

Theatrical Anecdote

ib.

The Listener.

Anecdote of the author of Caroline de Licht-

field ....

ib. Prejudices in favour of Popularity .......

..... 28

Letter to the Listener on Theatrical Perform-

Abridgment of Natural History, in a series

29

of Letters from a Lady to her Daughter. On modern Education

ib.

The River Horse

The Portrait of my Father.

The Crocodile

ib. Character of Lambert

.......... 31

The Alligator

9 ) Recovery of a Portrait

ib,

Letter

8

36 117
LITERARY CONTENTS (Continued.)

Letter to the Editor.

Covent Garden.-Sketch of the Farce of Who

Blessings of a happy Marriage .................. 32 can I be?

............. 40

Prudent Mothers make prudent Daughters ... 33

Haymarket Theatre-Opening of, ..

................ 41

English Opera.- Account of the Performers ib.

French Comedians at the Argyle Rooms ib.

POETRY

FRENCH THEATRICALS.

Review of, and Extracts from, The Arctic

Expedition

............... 35 Theatre de l'Opera Comique.-Sketch of The

The Birth of the Butterfly

ib.

ib,

Little Red Riding Hood

Spring; a Pastoral Poem

Theatre du Vaudeville.-Of Let us be French-

42

Theatre de la Gaite.-Of The Little Beggar

FASHIONS FOR AUGUST, 1818.

Boy

ib.

Explanation of the Prints of Fashion. Theatre de la Rue de Chartres.-Of Harlequin

No. 1. Summer Recess Ball Dress

37

Jealous

ib.

No. 2. Parisian Bonnets .....

ib. Theatre at Vienna.–Of the Tragedy of Sapho 43

General v bservations on Fashion and Dress ib.

LITERARY INTELLIGENCE.

Cabinet of Taste; or Monthly Compendium

of Foreign Costumes.-Costume of Paris... 38

Review of The Method of Conducting Air by

ib.

Remarks on the Progressive Improvements

forced Ventilation

in Dress

Edwin and Henry

.......... 45

39

· A Practical Guide to the Manage-

ment of the Teeth

ib.

MONTHLY MISCELLANY; Wonderful Discovery

............ 47

INCLUDING VARIETIES CRITICAL, LITE The Ædephone

ib.

RARY, AND HISTORICAL.

Singular instance of extraordinary Memory ib.

The Kaleidoscope

ib.

THE THEATRES.

Births, Marriages, and Deaths ............... 48

Drury. Lane-Closing of,

40

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LA BELLE ASSEMBLÉE;

For JULY, 1818.

Pew and Improved Series.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF ILLUSTRIOUS AND

DISTINGUISHED CHARACTERS.

Number One Hundred and Twelve.

MISS CLARA FISHER.

This very young lady, whose extra seventeen nights to crowded houses.ordinary talents may justly be deemed | On the 8th of March, 1818, she appeared wonderful at her early state of infancy, is in the pantomime of Gulliver, at Coventthe fourth daughter of Mr. Fisher, a re Garden, in the character of Richard III. spectable auctioneer; and was born on the and where she performed it before the 14th of July, 1811. Nature endowed her Prince Regent and a numerous list of per. with an uncommon share of intellect; and sons of distinction. Mr Elliston engaged such was her nicety of ear to music, in her for a few nights at Birmingham, where wbich she took great delight, that soon she was received with the warmest ap. after she could walk she would learn any | plause; her success has been equal at Worair with the truest correctness, after hearing cester, Bath, and Bristol. We are credibly it played only once or twice on the piano- informed that she means this summer to forte. Her parents were not frequenters || visit Brighton, Margate, Southampton, of the Theatre, therefore her dramatic ta- || Weymouth, and the principal wateringlents are the more extraordinary: That | places, previous to her engagements at powerful attraction, Miss O'Neill, induced, | Dublin, Edinburgh, Liverpool, &c. however, Mr. Fisher and his family to visit Our readers caunot but recollect the Covent-Garden, when that lady appeared well-merited encomiums bestowed on this in the character of Jane Shore; and the charming and interesting child in the daily little Clara, on her return home, evinced prints, after her performing in Lilliput and the impression made on her miud by the | Gulliver. Enchained by surprise and adperformance: she retired into a corner of | miration, the lash fell from the hand of the apartment, and went through, in dumb criticism, and all, unanimously, bestowed shew, all she had witnessed ; she was ihen the meed of well-earned praise. under four years of age, and her aptness to

Two elder sisters of the interesting Clara, imitate all she saw continued several are very promising young actresses, and months.

perform counter characters to the lovely Mr. D. Corri, the celebrated composer,

infant. They are constantly noticed by proposed to bring out a drama altered from the higher classes of society, and invited to Garrick's Lilliput: to Miss Clara was the most fashionable parties, where their assigned the character of Lord Flimnap; juvenile talents, devoid of all conceit or and on the 10th of December, 1817, she'' presumption, though they must b conmade her first debut before a London scious of their excellence, ensure them the audience, where she met with the most most flattering reception. flattering reception, and the piece ran for

HISTORY OF MUSIC.

ORIGINAL COMMUNICATIONS.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF MUSIC,
FROM THE EARLIEST AGES TO THE PRESENT TIME, SELECTED

AUTHORITIES.

FROM THE BEST

(Continued from Vol XVII. page 245.)

If we peruse attentively the ancient in that of Provence. Les Grandes Chrohistorians and poets of France, we shall find niques de France inform us, that Thibaut, that their military songs were of the high- || at the age of thirty-five, having conceived est antiquity. In these they celebrated a violent and hopeless passion for Queen the heroic and martial deeds of their great | Blanche, was advised to apply bimself to commanders; and they were sung in cho music and poetry. He did so; and prorus by a whole army when going out to duced the most beautiful songs and meloattack an enemy; which custom they pro. dies ever heard. It is the opinion of the bably derived from their German ancestors. French antiquaries, that the tunes of the Charlemagne was particularly fond of these ancient MSS. of the songs of this Prince warlike songs, and like our own Alfred, were originally set by himself. collected them and learned them by heart. The fourteenth century seems the era It was customary at that time to have a when music in parts, moving in different Herald Minstrel, chosen on account of the melodies, came first in favour. In the prestrength and clearness of his voice, which ceding age we can find no music of more not only qualified him for animating the than two parts, in counterpoint of note soldiers to battle, but also for making pro- | against note. clamations of the public ceremonies ; he

From the close connexion of the arts to was also accustomed to sing metrical songs each other, we cannot trace the progressive at public festivals. The famous song of improvement of music in Italy, without Roland, continued in favour among the first speaking of its language. Its sweetFrench soldiers as late as the battle of ness and facility of utterance render it cerPoictiers, in the time of John of France. tainly more favourable to singing than any

In the time of Philip de Valois, between other language. The sweet eloquence of the years 1228 and 1250, the French had in the Tuscan dialect renders it superior to use more than thirty musical instruments; all others for expressing words set to muthe form of the greatest part of which is sic; and the lyric verses of Italy were long unknown to the present age. Among known to be superior to every other kind them, however, are the following well- of poetry. known instruments of modern times flutes, Though the French wrote verses in their harps, hautbois, bassoons, trumpets, small own dialect much sooner than the Italians, kettle-drums carried by a boy and beaten yet their language was brought to no perby a man, cymbals, tambour de basque, two | fection till the close of the century before long speaking trumpets, two large hand- | last, but the writings of the Italians even bells, guitars, bagpipes of various kinds, a of the fourteenth century, are regarded as dulcimer, a rielle (or as it is vulgarly called perfect models, both as to diction and cona hurdy-gurdy), and regals, or what we struction : and, indeed, in that century all call portable organs.

the nations of Europe began to cultivate In regard to the French vocal music, the the art of poetry; but none were so sweet poets made a particular line of an old song and tasteful on this head as the Italians, the refrain, or burthen to the new. The In the History of Malaspina we find mensongs of Thibaut, King of Navarre, are tioned a chorus of women singing through placed at the head of those that have been the streets, accompanied with cymbals, preserved in the French language, as those drums, flutes, viols, &c. in the year 1208, of Guillaume IX. Duke of Aquitaine, are when Prince Conrad was marching against

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