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dence in England. The journals must have been the effect produced of the day informed us of their on their minds, by the circummovements and their gratifications; stances and connexions which surand, we doubt not, everything rounded them on their arrival in which was deemed conducive to this country! " What,” they their enjoyment was readily and would naturally exclaim, “is this courteously adopted by those who that land of Christians, of which ministered to their pleasures; but we so often heard our good inwho, with any measure of Chris- structors speak, in our native isles ? tian feelings, could forget, that not are these scenes of mirth and volong before they embarked for this luptuous gratification compatible country, they had been visited with the profession and the prinby the “servants of the Most High ciples of the new religion ? May God," who were anxious not only we introduce to our people on our for the civilization, but for the return to them, the amusements moral interests and eternal happie and the dissipations of this great ness of the population over whom Christian country, without fear of they presided? Who could forget being told by the Missionaries, on that it was the high and sacred our arrival, that they who live object of that “ band of men, in pleasure are dead while they whose hearts God had touched,” live! For where is the essential to erect the standard of the cross, difference in point of tendency and to establish the principles of " pure effect, between the festivities of our and undefiled religion," and to lay idolatrous ancestors, and the revel. the foundation of a new order of lings of this Christian land ? We tbings in the laws and institutions are not a whit the less indisposed of that spiritual kingdom, which by their influence, to all that is is “righteousness, peace, and joy earthly, sensual, and devilish!'» in the Holy Ghost ?" By such If such must have been the men it would naturally be regarded thoughts and feelings of these vias one of the direct and immediate sitors, supposing them capable of results of their benevolent enter- thinking and feeling at all on the prise, that in proportion to their subject, then it must be most sesuccess, the people of Hawaii riously regretted that they witwould be induced to abandon not inessed no better specimens of the only the “abominable idolatries” influence of Christian principles ; by which they and their forefathers and that no higher illustrations had been fascinated and seduced, of their practical effect were but all those scenes of revelry and presented to their notice, durdissipation with which they were ing their short residence in our associated. Imagine then, that country. We know not, indeed, with the distinct remembrance of what were the “ reasons of state" the solemn delıortations with which that prevented these interesting a Christian Missionary would de- personages from being introduced nounce and condemn the sensual to a direct intercourse with those and polluting festivities of the classes of society in which someSandwich islanders - under the thing like the tendency and effect impression that they were precisely of true Christianity would have of the same order, and had the been contemplated. But we think same tendency with the Kwuar, the it would have afforded more grate“ revellings, and such like,” for- ful materials for recollection, if bidden by an inspired apostle; the influential members of our imagine, if such were the remem Missionary Societies, regardless of brances and impressions of Riho- the petty and worthless formalities riho, and his attendants, what ofetiquette, had used all practicable means of effecting an immediate in earth, describing the extensive lakes, the troduction to the party on their armountains, and mines of North and South rival-had endeavoured to encircle

America ; the elephants and inhabitants

cie of India, the houses, manufactures, &c. them by Christian associations of England, with no small accuracy, con. and had been as anxious about sidering he had never seen them. He their knowing something of the had a great thirst for knowledge, and religion of Britain, as others were

was diligent in his studies. I recollect

e his remarking one day, when he opened to initiate them into the mysteries his writing-desk, that he expected more of its follies and its pleasures. advantage from that desk, than from a But the opportunity of doing fine brig belonging to him, lying at anchor them good, has passed away for

opposite the house in which we were sit

ting. Mr. Bingham and myself were his ever; and Rihoriho and his queen daily teachers, and have often been sur have been cited before the Judge of prised at his unwearied perseverance. I “ quick and dead !” May it appear have sat beside him at bis desk soinetimes another day, that this country has

• from nine or ten o'clock in the morning,

till nearly sun-set, during which his pen not contributed to their condem- has ne not contributed to their condem- has not been out of his hand more than nation ! It may have been the in- three-quarters of an hour, while he was at terposition of mercy on behalf of dinner. their country, that they were not

“ We do not know that Christianity

exerted any decisive influence on 'his suffered to return.

heart. He was willing to receive the mis. These remarks have detained sionaries on their first arrival, availed our readers from Mr. Ellis's inte himself of their knowledge to increase bis resting account of the late king own, and, during the latter years of his and queen. We shall now present obiect: declared his conviction of the

life, was decidedly favourable to their all that he has communicated truth of Christianity; attended public respecting them.

worship bimself on the Sabbath, and re" The late king of the Sandwich Islands

commended the same to his people. was the son of Tamehameha, former king,

6. His moral character was not marked and Keopuolani, daughter of Kauikeouili,

by that cruelty, rapacity, and insensibility and Kakuiapoiwa. He was born in the

to the sufferings of the people, which fre

quently distinguish the arbitrary chiefs of eastern part of Hawaii, in the year 1795 or 1796. The name by which he was gene

uncivilized nations. He appears in generally known was Rihoriho, which was only

ral to have been kind; and, in several a contraction of Kalaninuirihoriho, lite.

places on our tour, the mothers shewed us rally, the heavens great black-from Ka

their children, and told us, that when lani, the heavens, nui, great, and rihoriho,

Rihoriho had passed that way, be had applied to any thing burnt to blackness.

kissed them--a coudescension they seemed On public occasions, he was sometimes

to think much of, and which they will called Tamehameha, after his father,

probably remember tò the end of their though names are not always hereditary.

days. But, though generous in his dispoBesides these, he had a variety of other

„sition, he was addicted to intoxication ; names, the most common of which was

whether from natural inclination, or the Jolani. The word lani, heaven or sky,

influence and example of others, is not formed a component part in the name of

now to be determined ; frequently, to my most chiefs of distinction:

own knowledge, it has been entirely from " The early habits of Rihoriho did not

the latter. Had he, in early life, been

privileged to associate with individuals warrant any great expectations. His na

whose conduct and principles were få. tural disposition was frank and humane. The natives always spoke of him as good

vourable to virtue and religion, there is natured, except when he was under the

every reason to suppose his moral chainfluence of ardent spirits; his manners

racter, with respect at least to this vice, were perfectly free, at the same time dig.

would have been as irreproachable as

his mental habits were commendable. nified, and always agreeable to those who were about him. His mind was natu

But, alas for him ! it was quite the re

verse. rally inquisitive. The questions he usually presented to foreigners were by no

“ Though not distinguished by the ar

dour and strength of character so conspimeans trifling; and his memory was re'tentive. His general knowledge of the

cuous in his father, he possessed both world was much greater than could have

decision and enterprise : the abolition of been expected. I have heard him enter

the national idolatry was a striking intain a party of chiefs for hours together,

stance of the former ; and his voyage to with accounts of the different parts of the

England, of the latter.
bany, VA suo lavoro costi

!

66 The motives by which he was induced any, or countenanced their absconding to undertake that long and hazardous from their ships, she has often fed them voyage were highly commendable. They when hungry, and given them native tapa were-- a desire to see, for himself, countries for clothing. of which he had heard such various and « Kamehamaru was at all times lively interesting accountsma wish to have a and agreeable in company; and though personal interview with his majesty the her application to her book and her pen king of Great Britain, or the chief mem. was equal to that of the king, her improve: bers of tbe British government, for the ment was more gradual, and her knowpurpose of confirming the cession of

ledge less extensive. the Sandwich Islands, and placing him.

." She excelled, however in the manage. self and his dominions under British pro

ment of his domestic affairs, which were tection.

conducted by her with great judgment and " It was also his intention to make himself acquainted with the tenor and

address ; and though formerly accustomed forms of administering justice in the

to use ardent spirits, from the time she courts of law--the principles of commerce

put herself under christian instruction, she -and other subjects which seemed impor.

entirely discontinued that, and every other tant to the welfare of the islands.

practice inconsistent with her profession " " Although the melancholy death of

of Christianity. Her attendance on the the king and of his queen prevented the

duties of religion was maintained with

commendable regularity. accomplishment of these objects so fully as might have been wished, yet no unfriendly

“ Her disposition was affectionate. I feeling is likely to be entertained by the

have seen her and the king sitting beside people, as to the cause of it. The account

the couch of Keopuolani, her mother-inthe survivors will convey to their country

law, day after day, when the latter has men, of the generous reception they met; been ill; and, on these occasions, though the hospitable manner in which they were

there might be several servants in con. entertained, while they lived ; the high stant attendance, she would allow no inrespect paid to their remains, and other dividual but her husband or herself to tokens of friendship, will not only prevent hand to the patient any thing she migbt suspicion, but combine to confirm that want, or even to fan flies from her per: attachment and confidence which they son. have so long felt towards England.

" The circumstances attending her de"No disturbance of the general tran. parture from the islands was peculiarly quillity, or change in the government, affecting. The king had gone on board is to be apprehended from this event. the L'Aigle ; the boat was waiting to Rihoriho left a younger brother, Kuui convey her to the ship. She arose, en. keoule, about ten years of age, who will braced her mother and other relations be bis successor. A regency will govern most affectionately, and passed through during his minority, and ihe executive the crowd towards the boat. The people authority will probably continue to be fell down on their knees as she walked exercised by Kuraimoku, and the other along, pressing and saluting her feet, fre. chiefs with whom Rihoriho left it, when quently bathing them with tears of unbe embarked for England.

feigped sorrow, and making loud wailings, 6. The queen who accompanied him, and in which they were joined by the thouwho died at the same time, and left a fond sands who thronged the sea-shore. mother and an affectionate people to la- oso When she reached the water-side, she ment her loss, was the daughter of Tame- turned, and beckoned to the people to hameha and Kalakua; she was born about

ja and Kalakua ; she was born about cease their cries. As soon as they were the year 1797 or 1798, being two years silent, she said, I am going to a distant younger than Riboriho, and about twenty- land, and perhaps we shall not meet six years of age when she left the islands.

again. Let us pray to Jehovah, that he Like all the persons of distinction, she may preserve us on the water, and you on had many names ; but that by which she the shore.' She then called Auna, a nawas generally known, was Kamehamuru, tive teacher from the Society Islands, and (shade of Kamea,) from kameha, a contrac- requested him to pray. He did so ; at tion of her father's name, and maru, shade.

ame, and maru, shade. the conclusion, she waved her hand to the She was distinguished for good nature, people, and said. " Arohá nui oukou :' and was much beloved by all her subjects. (Attachment great to you :) She then The poor people, when unable to pay stepped into the boat, evidently much their rent, or under the displeasure of the

affected. The multitude followed her, king and chiefs, or embarrassed on any not only to the beach, but into the sea, other account, frequently repaired to her, where many, wading into the water, stood and found a friend whose aid was never waving their hands, exhibiting every attirefused. . She was also kind to those fo- tude of sorrow, and uttering their loud reigners who might be distressed in the

U-e! u-e! (alas ! alas !) till the boat had islands; and though she never harboured

pulled far ont to sea."-pp. 424--430.

means of effecting an immediate in- earth, describing the extensive lakes, the troduction to the party on their ar- mountains, and mines of North and South rival-had endeavoured to encircle

America ; the elephants and inhabitants

of India ; the houses, manufactures, &c. them by Christian associations- of England, with no small accuracy, con and had been as anxious about sidering he had never seen them. He their knowing something of the had a great thirst for knowledge, and religion of Britain, as others were

was diligent in his studies. I recollect

his remarking one day, when he opened to initiate them into the mysteries his writing-desk, that he expected more of its follies and its pleasures. advantage from that desk, tban from a But the opportunity of doing

fine brig belonging to him, lying at anchor

fine brig belonging to hin them good, has passed away for

opposite the house in which we were sit

ting. Mr. Bingham and myself were his ever; and Rihoriho and his queen daily teachers, and have often been surhave been cited before the Judge of prised at his unwearied perseverance. I “ quick and dead !” May it appear have sat beside him at bis desk soinetimes another day, that this country has

from nine or ten o'clock in the morning,

till nearly sun-set, during which his pen not contributed to their condem- has not been out of his hand more than nation! It may have been the in- three-quarters of an hour, while he was at terposition of mercy on behalf of dinner. their country, that they were not

“ We do not know that Christianity

exerted any decisive influence on his suffered to return.

heart. He was willing to receive the misThese remarks have detained sionaries on their first arrival, availed our readers from Mr. Ellis's inte himself of their knowledge to increase bis resting account of the late king own, and, during the latter years of his

life, was decidedly favourable to their and queen. We shall now present

object; declared his conviction of the all that he has communicated truth of Christianity; attended public respecting them.

worship bimself on the Sabbath, and re· “ The late king of the Sandwich Islands

commended the same to his people. was the son of Tamehameha, former king,

“ His moral character was not marked and Keopuolani, daughter of Kauikevuili,

by that cruelty, rapacity, and insensibility and Kakuiapoiwa. He was born in the

to the sufferings of the people, which freeastern part of Hawaii, in the year 1795 or

quently distinguish the arbitrary chiefs of 1796. The name by which he was gene.

uncivilized nations. He appears in generally known was Rihoriho, which was only

ral to have been kind ; and, in several .contraction of Kulaninuirihoriho, lite.

places on our tour, the mothers shewed us

their children, and told us, that when rally, the heavens great black-from Ka lani, the heavens, nui, great, and rihoriho,

Rihoriho had passed that way, be had

kissed them--a coudescension they seemed applied to any thing burnt to blackness. On public occasions, he was sometimes

to think much of, and which they will called

probably remember to the end of their Tamehamelia, after his father, though names are not always hereditary.

days. But, though generous in his dispoBesides these, he had a variety of other

sition, he was addicted to intoxication ; names, the most common of which was

wbether from natural inclination, or the Iolani. The word lani, heaven or sky,

influence and example of others, is not formed a component part in the name of

now to be determined ; frequently, to my

own knowledge, it bas been entirely from most chiefs of distinction: " The early habits of Rihoriho did not

the latter. Had he, in early life, been

privileged to associate with individuals warrant any great expectations. His natural disposition was frank and humane.

whose conduct and principles were faThe natives always spoke of him as good

vourable to virtue and religion, there is natured, except when he was under the

every reason to suppose his moral chainfluence of ardent spirits ; his manners

racter, with respect at least to this vice, were perfectly free, at the same time dig.

would have been as irreproachable as

his mental habits were commendable. nified, and always agreeable to those who were about him. His mind was natu

But, alas for him ! it was quite the re

verse. rally inquisitive. The questions he usually presented to foreigners were by no

“ Though not distinguished by the armeans trifling; and his memory was re

dour and strength of character so conspitentive. His general knowledge of the

cuous in his father, he possessed both world was much greater than could have

decision and enterprise : the abolition of

the national idolatry was a striking inbeen expected. I have heard him enter. tain a party of chiefs for hours together,

stance of the former ; and his voyage to with accounts of the different parts of the

England, of the latter..

$The motives by which he was induced any, or countenanced their absconding to undertake that long and hazardous from their ships, she has often fed them voyage were bighly commendable. They when bungry, and given them native tapa were-- a desire to see, for himself, countries for clothing. of which he had heard such various and « Kamehamaru was at all times lively interesting accountsma wish to have a and agreeable in company; and though personal interview with his majesty the her application to her book and her pen king of Great Britain, or the chief mem

was equal to that of the king, her improve, bers of the British government, for the

ment was more gradual, and her knowpurpose of confirming the cession of

ledge less extensive. the Sandwich Islands, and placing him. self and his dominions under British pro

“ She excelled, however in the manage.

ment of his domestic affairs, which were tection. " It was also bis intention to make

conducted by ber with great judgment and bimself acquainted with the tenor and

address ; and though formerly accustomed forms of administering justice in the

to use ardent spirits, from the time she courts of law---the principles of commerce

put herself under christian instruction, she - and other subjects which seemed impor.

entirely discontinued that, and every other

practice inconsistent with her profession tant to the welfare of the islands. " Although the melancholy death of

of Christianity. Her attendance on the

duties of religion was maintained with the king and of his queen prevented the

commendable regularity. accomplishment of these objects so fully as might have been wished, yet no unfriendly

“ Her disposition was affectionate. I feeling is likely to be entertained by the

have seen her and the king sitting beside people, as to the cause of it. The account

the couch of Keopuolani, her mother-inthe survivors will convey to their country law, day after day, when the latter has men, of the generous reception they met;

been ill; and, on these occasions, though the hospitable manner in which they were

there might be several servants in con. entertained, while they lived; the high stant attendance, she would allow no inrespect paid to their remains and other dividual but her busband or herself to tokens of friendship, will not only prevent hand to the patient any thing she might suspicion, but combine to consirm that want, or even to fan flies from her per. attachment and confidence which they son. have so long felt towards England.

- The circumstances attending her de- No disturbance of the general tran. parture from the islands was peculiarly quillity, or change in the government, affecting. The king had gone on board is to be apprehended from this event. the L'Aigle; the boat was waiting to Rihoriho left a younger brother, Kuui convey her to the ship. She arose, en. keoule, about ten years of age, who will braced her mother and other relations be his successor. A regency will govern most affectionately, and passed through during his minority, and ihe executive the crowd towards the boat. The people authority will probably continue to be fell down on their knees as she walked exercised by Kuraimoku, and the other along, pressing and saluting her feet, frecbiefs with whom Riboriho left it, when quently bathing them with tears of unbe embarked for England.

feigned sorrow, and making loud wailings, The queen who accompanied him, and in which they were joined by the thouwho died at the same time, and left a fond sands who thronged the sea-shore. mother and an affectionate people to la- or When she reached the water-side, she ment her loss, was the daughter of Tame- turned, and beckoned to the people to bameha and Kalakua; she was born about 'cease their cries. As soon as they were the year 1797 or 1798, being two years

silent, she said, 'I am going to a distant younger than Rihoriho, and about twenty- land, and perhaps we shall not meet six years of age when she left the islands.

again. Let us pray to Jehovah, that he Like all the persons of distinction, she

may preserve us on the water, and you on had many names ; but that by which she.

the shore.' She then called Auna, a nawas generally known, was Kamehamaru, tive teacher from the Society Islands, and (shade of Kamea,) from kameha, a contrac

requested him to pray. He did so; at tion of her father's name, and maru, shade. the conclusion, she waved her hand to the She was distinguished for good nature, people, and said, "Arohá nui oukou :' and was much beloved by all her subjects. (Attachment great to you:) She then The poor people, when unable to pay stepped into the boat, evidently much their rent, or under the displeasure of the affected. The multitude followed her, king and chiefs, or embarrassed on any not only to the beach, but into the sea, other account, frequently repaired to her, where many, wading into the water, stood and found a friend whose aid was never waving their hands, exhibiting every attirefused. She was also kind to those fo

tude of sorrow, and uttering their loud reigners who might be distressed in the

u-e! u-e! (alas ! alas !) till the boat had islands; and though she never harboured Enlled for

Pulled far ont to sea." -pp. 424--430. .

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