Essay on Civil Policy, Or the Science of Legislation: Comprising the Origin and Nature of Governmet, Religion, Laws, Population, Wealth, and Happiness. With a Review of the Practice of the English Law, and Hints for Its Improvement

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W. Pickering, 1830 - 486 ページ
 

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358 ページ - What is prudence in the conduct of every private family, can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom. If a foreign country can supply us with a commodity cheaper than we ourselves can make it, better buy it of them with some part of the produce of our own industry, employed in a way in which we have some advantage.
358 ページ - It is the maxim of every prudent master of a family, never to attempt to make at home what it will cost him more to make than to buy.
26 ページ - The only way, whereby any one divests himself of his natural liberty, and puts on the bonds of civil society, is by agreeing with other men to join and unite into a community...
467 ページ - We trust our health to the physician: our fortune and sometimes our life and reputation to the lawyer and attorney. Such confidence could not safely be reposed in people of a very mean or low condition. Their reward must be such, therefore, as may give them that rank in the society which so important a trust requires.
24 ページ - Indeed it is perfectly amazing, that there should be no other state of life, no other occupation, art, or science, in which some method of instruction is not looked upon as requisite, except only the science of legislation, the noblest and most difficult of any.
208 ページ - It is in this manner that the demand for men, like that for any other commodity, necessarily regulates the production of men, quickens it when it goes on too slowly, and stops it when it advances too fast.
433 ページ - The principle of gravitation is not more certain than the tendency of such laws to change wealth and power into misery and weakness; to call away the exertions of labour from every object, except that of providing mere subsistence ; to confound all intellectual distinction ; to busy the mind continually in supplying the body's wants ; until at last all classes should be infected with the plague of universal poverty.
76 ページ - ... by some novelty, to excite the languid devotion of his audience. No regard will be paid to truth, morals, or decency in the doctrines inculcated. Every tenet will be adopted that best suits the disorderly affections of the human frame.
76 ページ - ... the most decent and advantageous composition which he can make with the spiritual guides is to bribe their indolence, by assigning stated salaries to their profession...
75 ページ - The artisans, finding their profits to rise by the favour of their customers, increase as much as possible their skill and industry; and as matters are not disturbed by any injudicious tampering, the commodity is always sure to be at all times nearly proportioned to the demand.

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