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' A pan on the Units, or wild ball, which gives nnmeito lhfl can

ton of Uri.

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it was a messenger of woe llas sought the Austrian land; “Ah! gracious lady, evil newsl My lord lies on the strand.

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Now, would you know the minstrel Wight,
Who sings of strife so stern,

Albert the Souter is he hight,
A burgher of Lucerne.

A merry man was he,l wot, I, The night he made the lay,_ _ Returning from the bloody spot Where God had judgedtlta day. '\

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Tar; original of these verses occurs in a collection of German popular songs, entitled Sammlung Deuisclten Valkslieder, Berlin, 1807, published by Messrs Busching and Von der Hagen, both, and more especially the last, distinguished for their acquaintance with the ancient popular poetry and legendary history of Germany.

in the German editor's notice of the ballad, it is stated to have been extracted from a manuscript Chronicle of Nicolaus Thomann, chaplain to St Leonard in Weisenhorn, which bears the date 1533; and the song is stated by the author to have been generallysung in the neighbourhood at that early period. Thomann, as 'quoted by the German editor, seems faithfully to have believed the event he narrates. He quotes tombstones and obituaries to prove the existence of the personages of the ballad, and discovers that there actually died on the nth May, 1349, a Lady Von Neuffen, Countess of Marstetten, who was by birth of the house of Moringer. This lady he supposes to have been Moringer's daughter mentioned in the ballad. He quotes the same authority for the death of Berckhold Von Neuffen in the same year. The editors, on the whole, seem to embrace the opinion of Professor Smith, of Ulm, who, from the language of the ballad, ascribes its date to the 15th century.

The legend itself turns on an incident not peculiar to Germany, and which perhaps was not unlikely to happen in more instances than one, when crusaders abode long in the Holy Land, and their disconsolate dames received no tidings of their fate. A story very similar in circumstances, but without the miraculous machinery of Saint Thomas, is told of one of the ancient lords of Haigh-hall, in Lancashire, the patrimonial inheritance of the late Countess of Balcarras; and the particulars are represented on stained glass upon a window in that ancient manor-house.

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But blessings on the warder kind That oped my castle-gate,

For had I come at morrow-tide, I came a day too late.»

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Nennius. Is not peace the end of arms 1

Caratach. Not where the cause implies a general conquestHad we a difference with some petty isle, Or with our neighbours, Britons, for our landmarks, The taking in of some rebellious lord, Or making head against a slight commotion, After a day of blood, peace might be urged: But where we grapple for the land we live on, The liberty we hold more dear than life,

The gods we worship, and, next these, our honours, And, with those, swords, that know no end of battleThose men, beside themselves, allow no neighbour, Those minds, that, where the day is, claim inheritance, And, where the sun makes ripe the fruit, their harvest. And, where they march, but measure out more ground To add to Bome—

It must not be. —l\'o! as they are our foes,

Let 's use the peace of honour--that 's fair dealing;

But in our hands our swords. The hardy Roman,

That thinks to graft himself into my stock,
Must first begin his kindred under ground,
And be allied in ashes.

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Bonduca.

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Tan following War-song was written during the apprehension of an invasion. The corps of volunteers, to which it was addressed, was raised in 1797, consisting of gentlemen, mounted and armed at their own expense. It still subsists, as the Right Troop of the Royal Mid-Lothian Light Cavalry, commanded by the Honourable Lieutenant-Colonel Dundas. The noble and constitutional measure, of arming freemcn in defence of their own rights, was nowhere more successful than in Edinburgh, which furnished a force of 3000 armed and disciplined volunteers, including a regiment of cavalry, from the city and county, and two corps of artillery, each capable of serving twelve guns. To such a force, above all others, might, in similar circumstances, be applied the exhortation of our ancient Galgacus: \( Proinrle ituri in acicm, et majores vestros ct

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To horse! to horse! the standard flies, The bugles sound the call;

The Gallic navy stems the seas,

The voice of Battle ‘s on the breeze,
Arouse ye, one and all!

From high Dunedin’s towers we come,
A band of brothers true;

Our casqucs the leopards spoils surround,

With Scotland's hardy thistle crown'd;
We boast the red and blue.l

‘The Royal Colours.

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Though tamely crouch to Gallia's frown
Dull Holland's tardy train;

Their 'ravish’d toys though Romans mourn;

Though gallant Switzers vainly spurn,
And, foaming, gnaw the chain ;—-

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' The allusion is to the massacre of the Swiss Guards, on the fatal ioth August, 1792. It is painful, but not useless, to remark, that the passive temper with which the Swiss regarded the death of their bravest countrymen, mercilessly slaughtered in discharge of their duty. encouraged and authorized the progressive injustice by which the Alps, once the seat of the most virtuous and free people upon the Continent, have, at length, been converted into

the citadel of a foreign and military despot. A state degraded is half enslaved.

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