Breaking Barriers: Travel and the State in Early Modern Japan

前表紙
Harvard Univ Asia Center, 1994 - 372 ページ
0 レビュー

Travel in Tokugawa Japan was officially controlled by bakufu and domainal authorities via an elaborate system of barriers, or sekisho, and travel permits; commoners, however, found ways to circumvent these barriers, frequently ignoring the laws designed to control their mobility, in this study, Constantine Vaporis challenges the notion that this system of travel regulations prevented widespread travel, maintaining instead that a "culture of movement" in Japan developed in the Tokugawa era.

Using a combination of governmental documentation and travel literature, diaries, and wood-block prints, Vaporis examines the development of travel as recreation; he discusses the impact of pilgrimage and the institutionalization of alms-giving on the freedom of movement commoners enjoyed. By the end of the Tokugawa era, the popular nature of travel and a sophisticated system of roads were well established: Vaporis explores the reluctance of the bakufu to enforce its travel laws, and in doing so, beautifully evokes the character of the journey through Tokugawa Japan.

 

レビュー - レビューを書く

レビューが見つかりませんでした。

目次

The Arms and Legs of the Realm
17
The Road Infrastructure
32
Maintenance and General Road Conditions
39
Bridges and River Crossings
49
The Soc1al Organ1zat1on of the Goka1do Network
61
Economic Problems of the Post Stations
71
Contention and Confrontation
83
Sekisho Before the Institutionalization of Alternate
100
Sekisho Regulations and Policy
121
Domain Barriers
128
Perm1ts and Passages
135
The Benevolence of the Realm
175
The Major Pilgrimage Circuits 246
204
Travel as Recreat1on
217
Conclus1on
269
L1st of Works C1ted
333

The Sekisho Network 106107
108
Military and Police Functions
111

他の版 - すべて表示

多く使われている語句

この書籍への参照

ブックス全体の結果 »

著者について (1994)

Constantine Nomikos Vaporis is Associate Professor of History at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

書誌情報