Osaka 1615: The last battle of the samurai

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Bloomsbury Publishing, 2012/06/20 - 96 ページ
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In 1614-15 Osaka Castle was Japan's greatest fortification, measuring approximately 2 miles in length with walls 100 feet high. It was guarded by 100,000 samurai, determined to defend the last of the once-powerful Toyotomi clan. The castle was seemingly impenetrable; however, Tokugawa Ieyasu, the founder of the ruling dynasty, was determined to destroy this remaining threat to the Tokuwaga ruling dynasty. This book explores the bitter struggle of the Summer and Winter campaigns, which eventually saw the last great clash of the samurai and defined the balance of power in Japan for years to come.
 

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目次

Introduction
7
Origins Of The Campaign
8
The Heir To Misfortune
9
Gunpowder Treason And Plots
13
For Whom The Bell Tolls
14
Chronology
16
Opposing Commanders
18
Osaka Commanders
19
Hideyoris Artillery
57
819 January 1615
58
The Peace Negotiations
60
The Summer Campaign
62
Orders Of Battle
64
Osaka Army
65
The Advance To Osaka
66
2326 May 1615
67

Other Commanders
20
Opposing Armies
21
The Winter Campaign
26
Toyotomi Hideyoris Plans
28
Eastern Army
30
Osaka Army
31
The Defences Of Osaka
32
The Inner Defences Of Osaka
35
Securing Positions
37
1929 December 1614
41
OctoberDecember 1614
43
34 January 1615
44
The Artillery Bombardment
49
3 June 1615
68
3 June 1615
72
3 June 1615
73
1200pm 4 June 1615
76
1200pm 4 June 1615
77
1200pm 4 June 1615
81
The Fall Of Osaka Castle
86
5 June 1615
87
Aftermath
89
The Battlefield Today
92
Bibliography
94
Index
95
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著者について (2012)

Stephen Turnbull took his first degree at Cambridge University, and received a PhD from Leeds University for his work on Japanese religious history. His work has been recognized by the awarding of the Canon Prize of the British Association for Japanese Studies and a Japan Festival Literary Award. He is currently an Honorary Research Fellow at the Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Leeds.

Richard Hook was born in 1938 and trained at Reigate College of Art. After national service with 1st Bn, Queen's Royal Regiment, he became art editor of Finding Out during the 1960s. He has worked as a freelance illustrator ever since, earning an international reputation particularly for his deep knowledge of Native American material culture, and has illustrated more than 50 Osprey titles. Richard is married and lives in Sussex; his three children Adam, Jason, and Christa are all professionally active in various artistic disciplines.

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