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Alcestis. B. c. 438. This play was brought out the last of a tetralogy, and stood therefore in place of a satyric drama, to which indeed it ars, in some parts, great similarity, particularly the representation of Hercules in his cups. This cumstance obviates, of course, the objection ainst the scene alluded to, as a “lamentable inruption to our feelings of commiseration for the amities of Admetus,”—an objection which, as it sms to us, would even on other grounds be unlable. (See Herm. Dissert. de Eurip. Alcest., efixed to Monk's edition of 1837.) While, wever, we recognize this satyric character in the 'cestis, we must confess that we cannot, as Müller es, see anything farcical in the concluding scene. Medea. B. c. 431. The four plays represented this year by Euripides, who gained the third ize, were Medea, Philoctetis, Dictys, and Mesres or Oepiotai, a satyric drama. (See Hartung, ur. Rest. pp. 332–374.) Hippolytus Coronifer. B. c. 428. In this year uripides gained the first prize. For the reason of e title Coronifer (a Teqjavmpópos), see vv. 72, &c. here was an older play, called the Veiled Hippo'us, no longer extant, on which the present agedy was intended as an improvement, and in hich the criminal love of Phaedra appears to have en represented in a more offensive manner, and avowed by herself boldly and without restraint. or the conjectural reasons of the title KaNuttévos, applied to this former drama, see Wagner, ragm. Eurip. p. 220, &c.; Walcken. Praes. in ippol. pp. 19, 20; comp. Hartung. Eurip. Itest. ). 4.1, &c., 401, &c. Hecuba. This play must have been exhibited 'fore B. c. 423, as Aristophanes parodies a pasge of it in the Clouds (1148), which he brought it in that year. Müller says that the passage in e Hecuba (645, ed. Pors.), a révet be kai Tis T. A., “ seems to refer to the misfortunes of the partans at Pylos in B. c. 425.” This is certainly issible ; and, if it is the case, we may fix the re'esentation of the play in B. c. 424.

Heracleidae. Müller refers it, by conjecture, to c. 421. Supplices. This also he refers, by conjecture, to

Yout the same period. Ion, of uncertain date. Hercules Furens, of uncertain date. Andromache, referred by Müller, on conjecture, the 90th Olympiad. (B. c. 420–417.) Troades. B. c. 415. Electra, assigned by Müller, on conjecture and om internal evidence, to the period of the Sicilian «pedition. (B. c. 415—413.) Helena. B. c.412, in the same year with the st play of the Andromeda. (Schol. ad Arist. 'hesm. 1012.) Iphigeneia at Tauri. Date uncertain. Orestes. B. c. 408. Phoenissae. The exact date is not known ; but he play was one of the last exhibited at Athens its author. (Schol. ad Arist. Ran. 53.) Bacchae. This play was apparently written for presentation in Macedonia, and therefore at a ory late period of the life of Euripides. See move. Iphigeneia at Aulis. This play, together with e Bacchae and the Alcmaeon, was brought out at thens, after the poet's death, by the younger uripides. [No. 3..]

Cyclops, of uncertain date. It is interesting as the only extant specimen of the Greek satyric drama, and its intrinsic merits seem to us to call for a less disparaging criticism than that which Müller passes on it. Besides the plays, there are extant five letters, purporting to have been written by Euripides. Three of them are addressed to king Archelaús, and the other two to Sophocles and Cephisophon respectively. Bentley, in a letter to Barnes (Bentley's Correspondence, ed. Wordsw. vol. i. p. 64), mentions what he considers the internal proofs of their spuriousness, some of which, however, are drawn from some of the false or doubtful statements with respect to the life of Euripides. But we have no hesitation in setting them down as spurious, and as the composition of some later dpeta\óyos, though Barnes, in his preface to them, published subsequently to Bentley's letter, declares that he who denies their genuineness must be either very impudent or deficient in judgment. The editio princeps of Euripides contains the Medea, Hippolytus, Alcestis, and Andromache, in capital letters. It is without date or printer's name, but is supposed, with much probability, to have been edited by J. Lascaris, and printed by De Alopa, at Florence, towards the end of the 15th century. In 1503 an edition was published by Aldus at Venice: it contains 18 plays, including the Rhesus and omitting the Electra. Another, published at Heidelberg in 1597, contained the Latin version of Aemil. Portus and a fragment of the Danaë, for the first time, from some ancient MSS. in the Palatine library. Another was published by P. Stephens, Geneva, 1602. In that of Barnes, Cambridge, 1694, whatever be the defects of Barnes as an editor, much was done towards the correction and illustration of the text. It contains also many fragments, and the spurious letters. Other editions are that of Musgrave, Oxford, 1778, of Beck, Leipzig, 1778–88, of Matthiae, Leipzig, 1813–29, in 9 vols. with the Scholia and fragments, and a variorum edition, published at Glasgow in 1821, in 9 vols. 8vo. The fragments have been recently edited in a separate form and very satisfactorily by Wagner, Wratislaw, 1844. Of separate plays there have been many editions, e. g. by Porson, Elmsley, Walckenaer, Monk, Pflugk, and Hermann. There are also numerous translations of different plays in several languages, and the whole works have been translated into English verse by Potter, Oxford, 1814, and into German by Bothe, Berlin, 1800. The Jocasta, by Gascoigne and Kinwelmarsh, represented at Gray's Inn in 1566, is a very free translation from the Phoenissae, much being added, omitted, and transposed. 3. The youngest of the three sons of the above, according to Suidas. After the death of his father he brought out three of his plays at the great Dionysia, viz. the Alcmaeon (no longer extant), the Iphigeneia at Aulis, and the IBacchac. (Schol. ad Arist. Ran. 67.) Suidas mentions also a nephew of the great poet, of the same name, to whom he ascribes the authorship of three plays, Medea, Orestes, and Polyaena, and who, he tells us, gained a prize with one of his uncle's tragedies after the death of the latter. It is probable that the son and the nephew have been confounded. Aristophanes too (Eccles. 825, 826, 829) mentions a certain Euripides who had shortly before proposed a property-tax of a fortieth. The proposal made him at first very popular, but the measure was thrown out, and he became forthwith the object of a general outcry, about B. c. 394. It is doubtful whether he is to be identified with the son or the nephew of the poet. (See Böckh, Publ. Econ. of Athens, pp. 493, 506, 520.) [E. E.] EUROPA (EUpdorm), according to the Iliad (xiv. 321), a daughter of Phoenix, but according to the common tradition a daughter of Agenor, was carried off by Zeus, who had metamorphosed himself into a bull, from Phoenicia to Crete. (Apollod. iii. 1. S l ; Mosch. ii. 7 ; Herod. i. 173; Paus. vii. 4. S 1, ix. 19. § l; Ov. Met. ii. 839, &c.; Comp. AGENOR.) Europe, as a part of the world, was believed to have received its name from this fabulous Phoenician princess. (Hom. Hymn. in Apoll. 251; Herod. iv. 45.) There are two other mythical personages of this name (Hes. Theog. 357; Pind. Pyth. iv. 46), which occurs also as a surname of Demeter. (Paus. ix. 39. § 4.) [L. S.] EURO'PUS (EUpairós), a son of Macedon and Oreithyia, the daughter of Cecrops, from whom the town of Europus in Macedonia was believed to have received its name. (Steph. Byz. s. v.) [L. S.] EUROPS (Eüpoğ), the name of two mythical personages, the one a son of Aegialeus and king of Sicyon, and the other a son of Phoroneus. (Paus. ii. 5. § 5, 34. S 5.) [L. S.] }:UROTAS (Eöpastas), a son of Myles and grandson of Lelex. He was the father of Sparte, the wife of Lacedaemon, and is said to have carried the waters, stagnating in the plain of Lacedaemon, into the sea by means of a canal, and to have called the river which arose therefrom after his own name, Furotas. (Paus. iii. 1. S 2.) Apollodorus (iii. 10. S 3) calls him a son of Lelex by the nymph Cleochareia, and in Stephanus of Byzantium (s. v. Taüyetov) his mother is called Taygete. (Comp. Schol. ad Pind. Pyth. iv. 15, Ol. vi. 40, ad Lycoph. 886.) [L. S.] EURY'ALE (Eöpud Am), the name of three mythical beings. (Hes. Theog. 276; Pind. Pyth. xxii. 20; Apollod. i. 4. S 3; Val. Flacc. v. 312; comp. OR1ON.) [L. S.] EURY'ALUS (Eöpúaxos). 1. A son of Mecisteus, is mentioned by Apollodorus (i. 9. § 16) among the Argonauts, and was one of the Epigoni who took and destroyed Thebes. (Paus. ii. 20. $4; Apollod. iii. 7. S. 2.) He was a brave warrior, and at the funeral games of Oedipus he conquered all his competitors (Hom. Il. xxiii. 608) with the exception of Epeius, who excelled him in wrestling. He accompanied Diomedes to Troy, where he was one of the bravest heroes, and slew several Trojans. (Il. ii. 565, vi. 20; Paus. ii. 30. § 9.) In the painting of Polygnotus at Delphi, he was represented as being wounded; and there was also a statue of him at Delphi, which stood between those of Diomedes and Aegialeus. (Paus. x. 10. § 2, 25. § 2. 2. One of the suitors of Hippodameia. (Paus. vi. 21. $7 ; Schol. ad Pind. Ol. i. 127.) 3. A son of Odysseus and Evippe, also called Doryclus or Leontophron, was killed by Tele

machus. (Parthen. Erot. 3.; Eustath. ad Hom. p. 1796.) There are four other mythical per

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royal house of the Agids. He was the son of rieus, and was one of the commanders of the I. daemonians at the battle of Plataeae, B. c.3 (Herod. ix. 10, 53, 55.) [See DoRIEus, vol. 1067, a.] [C.P. EURY'BATES(Eöpvéârms). 1. By Latin called Eribotes, was a son of Teleon, and the Argonauts. He was skilled in the art, and dressed the wound which Oileus from one of the Stymphalian birds. (Apollon. i. 73, ii. 1040; Hygin. Fab. 14; Wal. 402.) 2. The herald of Odysseus, who follo master to Troy. He is humorously descri hump-backed, of a brown complexion, and curly hair; but he was honoured by his master, he was kind and obedient. (Hom. Il. i. 31 184, ix. 170, Od. xix. 246.) [L. EURY'BATES (Eöpvšárms), an Argive, commander of 1000 volunteers who went to assistance of the Aeginetans in their war wi Athenians just before the Persian invasion. had practised the pentathlum, and challenged of the Athenians to single combat. Three he but fell himself by the hand of the fourth. (H

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who was victor in the wrestling-match, in Ol. when this species of contest was first introd (Paus. v. 8. § 7.) | 2. An Ephesian, whom Croesus sent wi large sum of money to the Peloponnesus to mercenaries for him in his war with Cyrus. however, went over to Cyrus, and betrayed whole matter to him. In consequence of treachery, his name passed into a proverb amo the Greeks. (Diod. Excerpt. de Virt. et Vit. p. 5; Ulpian, in Dem. de Coron. p. 137 ; Aeschin Ctes. c. 43; Plat. Protag. p. 327.) [C.P. M. EURY'BIA (Eöpvšía), a daughter of Po and Ge, who became by Crius the mothel Astraeus, Pallas, and Perses. (Hes. Theog. 3 Apollod. i. 2. S. 2.) There are two other m cal personages of this name. (Apollod. ii. 7. Diod. iv. 16.) [L. EURY BI’ADES. [THEMISTocles.] EURYCLEIA (Eöpūkaela). l. Accordin a Thessalian tradition, a daughter of Athamas Themisto, and the wife of Melas, by whom became the mother of Hyperes. (Schol. ad Pyth. iv. 221.) 2. A daughter of Ops, was purchased by and brought up Telemachus. When Odysseus turned home, she recognized him, though he in the disguise of a beggar, by a scar, and wards she faithfully assisted him against suitors. (Hom. Od. i. 429, &c., iv. 742, &c., 385, &c., xxii. xxiii.) [L. S. EURYCLEIDAS (EöpvkXe(6as), an Ath orator, who, together with Micon or Micion, sessed much influence with the people, which used unworthily, as the Athenians under guidance launched forth, according to Poly into the most unrestrained flattery towards kings, whose favour they desired to gain, cially Ptolemy IV. (Philopator) of Egypt. sanias tells us that Philip V. of Macedon ca them both to be removed by poison. (Polyb. v.l Paus. ii. 9.) [E. E. EURYCLES (Eöpvkais), a Spartan archi who built the finest of the Waths at Corinth,

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ned it with beautiful marbles. (Paus. ii. 3. ) P. S.] |U’RYCLES (EöpukAñs), a Greek physician rammarian, who must have lived in or before first century after Christ, as he is mentioned Erotianus. (Gloss. Hippocr. p. 308.) He apis to have written a commentary on Hippocrates, frticulis, which does not now exist. [W. A. G.] :URY'CRATES (Eöpukpárms) I., was the 11th g of Sparta in the Agid house: his reign was cident with the conclusion of the first Messen war. (Paus. iii. 3. § 3.) I. Grandson of the above, called also (Herod. 204) Eurycratides, was 13th of the same line, | reigned during the earlier and disastrous part the war with Tegea (Herod. i. 65), which his ndson Anaxandrides brought to a happy issue.

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s and Demonassa, was one of the Argonauts. ygin. Fab. 14.) Apollonius Rhodius (i. 67 ; p. Orph. Arg. 164) calls him a son of Ctimenus. !. One of the suitors of Penelope, who was ed by Odysseus. (Hom. Od. xviii. 297, xxii. }.) There are two more mythical personages his name (Apollod. ii. 1. S5; Hom. Il. v. 148), ich Ovid (1b. 331) uses as a surname of Hector the sense of “ruling far and wide.” [L. S.] EURYDA'MIDAS (Eöpuðauíðas), son of Agis ., king of Sparta. At the death of his father was yet a child. According to Pausanias, he s poisoned by Cleomenes with the assistance of ephors, and the royal power of his family nsferred to his brother Eucleides. The truth of s story is, however, questionable. (Paus. ii. 9. |, iii. 10. § 6; Manso, Sparta, vol. iii. 2, p. 6.) [C.P. M.] EURY'DICE (Eöpvölkm). The most celebrated the many mythical personages bearing this me is Eurydice, the wife of Orpheus. [ORPHEUS.] ere are seven others beside, viz. one of the Daides (Apollod. ii. 1. S 5), a daughter of Adrass and mother of Laomedon (Apollod. iii. 12. § 3), daughter of Lacedaemon and wife of Acrisius pollod. ii. 2. § 2, iii. 10. S 3 ; Paus. iii. 13. S 6), laughter of Clymenus and wife of Nestor (IIom. 1. iii. 452), the wife of Lycurgus and mother of rchemorus (Apollod. i. 9. § 14), the wife of Creon, ng of Thebes (Soph. Antigone), and, according to e “Cypria,” the wife of Aeneias. (Paus. x. 26. - [L. S.] EURY'DICE (Eöpušíkm). l. An Illyrian prinss, wife of Amyntas II., king of Macedonia, and other of the famous Philip. According to Justin ii. 4, 5), she engaged in a conspiracy with a tramour against the life of her husband ; but ough the plot was detected, she was spared by myntas out of regard to their common offspring. fter the death of the latter (b. c. 369), his eldest n, Alexander, who succeeded him on the throne, as murdered after a short reign by Ptolemy lorites, and it seems probable that Eurydice was oncerned in this plot also. From a comparison of le statements of Justin (vii. 5) and Diodorus (xv. l, 77, xvi. 2), it would appear that Ptolemy was le paramour at whose instigation Eurydice had tempted the life of her husband; and she cerinly seems to have made common cause with him iter the assassination of her son. (Thirlwall's

reece, vol. v. p. 164.) But the appearance of

another pretender to the throne, Pausanias, who

was joined by the greater part of the Macedonians,

reduced Eurydice to great difficulties, and led her to invoke the assistance of the Athenian general Iphicrates, who readily espoused her cause, drove out Pausanias, and reinstated Eurydice and Ptolemy in the full possession of Macedonia, the latter being declared regent for the young king Perdiccas. (Aeschin. de Fals. Leg. §§ 8, 9; Corn. Nep. Iphicrat. 3; Suidas, s. v. Kápavos.) Justin represents Eurydice as having subsequently joined with Ptolemy in putting to death Perdiccas also ; but this is certainly a mistake. On the contrary, Perdiccas in fact put Ptolemy to death, and succeeded him on the throne: what part Eurydice took in the matter we know not, any more than her subsequent fate. (Diod. xvi. 2; Syncell. p. 263, b.) 2. An Illyrian by birth, wife of Philip of Macedon, and mother of Cynane or Cynna. (Arrian, ap. I’hol. p. 70, b. ; Kuhn, ad Aelian. I’. II. xiii. 36; Paus. v. 17. § 4.) According to Dicaearchus (ap. Athen. xiii. p. 557, c.), her name was Audata. 3. Daughter of Amyntas, son of Perdiccas III., king of Macedonia, and Cynane, daughter of Philip. Her real name appears to have been Adea (Arrian, ap. I’hot. p. 70, b.); at what time it was changed to that of Eurydice we are not told. She was brought up by her mother, and seems to have been early accustomed by her to those masculine and martial exercises in which Cynane herself delighted. (Polyaen. viii. 60; Athen. xiii. p. 560.). She accompanied her mother on her daring expedition to Asia [CYNANE]; and when Cynane was put to death by Alcetas, the discontent expressed by the troops, and the respect with which they looked on Eurydice as one of the surviving members of the royal house, induced Perdiccas not only to spare her life, but to give her in marriage to the unhappy king Arrhidaeus. (Arrian, ap. Phot, p. 70, b.) We hear no more of her during the life of Perdiccas; but after his death her active and ambitious spirit broke forth : she demanded of the new governors, Pithon and Arrhidaeus, to be admitted to her due share of authority, and by her intrigues against them, and the favour she enjoyed with the army, she succeeded in compelling them to resign their office. But the arrival of her mortal enemy, Antipater, disconcerted her projects: she took an active part in the proceedings at Triparadeisus, and even delivered in person to the assembled soldiery an harangue against Antipater, which had been composed for her by her secretary Asclepiodorus; but all her efforts were unavailing, and Antipater was appointed regent and guardian of the king. (Arrian, ap. Phot. p. 71 ; Diod. xviii. 39.) She was now compelled to remain quiet, and accompanied her husband and Antipater to Europe. But the death of Antipater in 319, the more feeble character of Polysperchon, who succeeded him as regent, and the failure of his enterprises in Greece, and above all, the favourable disposition he evinced towards Olympias, determined her again to take an active part: she concluded an alliance with Cassander, and, as he was wholly occupied with the affairs of Greece, she herself assembled an army and took the field in person. Polysperchon advanced against her from Epeirus, accompanied by Aeacides, the king of that country, and Olympias, as well as by Roxana and her infant son. But the presence of Olympias was alone sufficient to decide the contest: the Macedonian troops refused to fight against the mother of Alexander, and went over to her side. Eurydice fled from the field of pattle to Amphipolis, but was seized and made prisoner. She was at first confined, together with her husband, in a narrow dungeon, and scantily supplied with food; but soon Olympias, becoming alarmed at the compassion excited among the Macedonians, determined to get rid of her rival, and sent the young queen in her prison a sword, a rope, and a cup of hemlock, with orders to choose her mode of death. The spirit of Eurydice remained unbroken to the last ; she still breathed defiance to Olympias, and prayed that she might soon be requited with the like gifts; then, having paid as well as she could the last duties to her husband, she put an end to her own life by hanging, without giving way to a tear or word of lamentation. (Diod. xix. l l ; Justin, xiv. 5; Athen. xiii. p. 560, f.; Aelian, W. H. xiii. 36.) Her body was afterwards removed by Cassander, and interred, together with that of her husband, with royal pomp at Aegae. (Diod. xix. 52; Athen. iv. p. 155, a.) 4. Daughter of Antipater, and wife of Ptolemy, the son of Lagus. The period of her marriage is not mentioned by any ancient writer, but it is probable that it took place shortly after the partition of Triparadeisus, and the appointment of Antipater to the regency, B. c. 321. (See Droysen, Gesch. d. Nachfolger, p. 154.) She was the mother of three sons, viz. Ptolemy Ceraunus, Meleager, who succeeded his brother on the throne of Macedonia, and a third (whose name is not mentioned), put to death by Ptolemy Philadelphus (Paus. i. 7. § 1); and of two daughters, Ptolemais, afterwards married to Demetrius Poliorcetes (Plut. Demetr. 32, 46), and Lysandra, the wife of Agathocles, son of Lysimachus. (Paus. i. 9. § 6.) It appears, however, that Ptolemy, who, like all the other Greek princes of his day, allowed himself to have several wives at once, latterly neglected her for Berenice (Plut. Pyrrh. 4); and it was probably from resentment on this account, and for the preference shewn to the children of Berenice, that she withdrew from the court of Egypt. In 287 we find her residing at Miletus, where she welcomed Demetrius Poliorcetes, and gave him her daughter Ptolemais in marriage, at a time when such a step could not but be highly offensive to Ptolemy. (Plut. Demetr. 46.) 5. An Athenian, of a family descended from the great Miltiades. (Plut. Demetr. 14; Diod. xx. 40.) She was first married to Ophellas, the conqueror of Cyrene, and after his death returned to Athens, where she married Demetrius Poliorcetes, on occasion of his first visit to that city. (Plut. Demetr. 14.) She is said to have had by him a son called Corrhabus. (Id. 53.) 6. A daughter of Lysimachus, king of Thrace, who gave her in marriage to Antipater, son of Cassander, king of Macedonia, when the latter invoked his assistance against his brother Alexander. (Justin, xvi. 1; Euseb. Arm. p. 155.) After the murder of Antipater [see vol. i. p. 202, a.], she was condemned by her father to perpetual imprisonment. (Justin, xvi. 2.) 7. The sister and wife of Ptolemy Philopator is called by Justin (xxx. 1) Eurydice, but her real name was Arsinoë. [ARSINoF, No. 5.] [E. H. B.] EURY'LEON (EUpoxéov), is said to have been the original name of Ascanius. (Dionys. i. 70; Appian, de Reg. Rom. i.) [L. S.

EURYLEON (EUpvXéov.) 1. One of the panions of Dorieus, with whom he went out to blish a colony, Heracleia in Sicily. Nearly all Spartan colonists, however, were slain by the thaginians and Egestaeans. Euryleon was the one of the leaders who escaped: he gathered remnants of the Lacedaemonians and took of Minoa, a colony of Selinus, and assisted the linuntians in getting rid of their tyrant Pei (Herod. v. 46; comp. DoRIEUs.) 2. A commander of the Lacedaemonians into (irst war against the Messenians. He was of T ban extraction, and a descendant of Cadmus. (P. iv. 7. § 3.) [L. S.] EURY'LOCHUS (EöpúAoxos), one of them panions of Odysseus in his wanderings. He the only one that escaped from the house of Chi while his friends were metamorphosed into swim and when Odysseus went to the lower world, I rylochus and Perimedes performed the prescri sacrifices. It was on his advice that the on panions of Odysseus carried off some of the on of Helios. (Hom. Od. x. 203, &c., xi. 23, & xii. 339, &c.) Another personage of the samemn is mentioned among the sons of Aegyptus. (Ap lod. ii. 1. § 5. [L.S.] EURY'LOCIIUS (EöpúAoxos), a :

mander, in the sixth year of the Peloponnes war, B. c. 426, was sent with 3000 heavy of the allies, at the request of the Aetolians to with them against the Messenians of Nau where Demosthenes, whom they had recently feated, was still remaining, but without any Eurylochus assembled his troops at Delphi, a ceived the submission of the Ozolian Locrians, a advanced through their country into the distridi Naupactus. The town itself was saved *:: manian succours obtained by Demosthenes, on introduction of which, Eurylochus retired, k took up his quarters among his neighbouring alo with a covert design in concert with the Ambo ciots against the Amphilochian Argives, and Aa. manians. After waiting the requisite time he set! army in motion from Proschium, and, by a wo chosen line of march contriving to elude the A. philochians and their allies, who were stationed oppose him, effected a junction with his friends Olpae. Here, on the sixth day following, t enemy, under Demosthenes, attacked him. Eur lochus took the right wing opposed to Demosthen with the Messenians and a few Athenians; a here, when already taking them on the flank, was surprised by the assault of an ambuscade his rear ; his troops were routed, himself slain, a

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of Lusiae in Arcadia, whose name is frequent mentioned by Xenophon in the Anabasis. On o occasion, when the army was marching throu the territory of the Carduchii, he protected Xen phon, whose shield-bearer had deserted him. I was one of the deputies sent by the arm Anaxibius. Afterwards we find him counselli his comrades to extort from Seuthes the pay whi he owed them. (Xen. Anab. iv. 2. § 21, 7. § 1 vii. 1. § 32. 6. § 40.) 2. A sceptical philosopher, a disciple of Pyrrh mentioned by Diogenes Laërtius (ix. 68). T same writer mentions another Eurylochus of L rissa, to whom Socrates refused to place hims:

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nder obligation by accepting money from him, or oing to his house (ii. 25). [C.P. M.] EURY'MACHUS (Eöpúuaxos), the name of jur mythical personages, viz. one of the suitors of lippodameia (Paus. vi. 21. § 6), a prince of the 'hlegyes who attacked and destroyed Thebes after he death of Amphion and Zethus (Eustath. ad Iom. p. 933), a son of Theano (Paus. x. 27), and ne of the suitors of Penelope. (Hom. Od. i. 399, te., xxii. 88.) [L. S.] EURY'MACHUS (Eöpúuaxos), grandson of nother Eurymachus and son of Leontiades, the Theban commander at Thermopylae, who led his men over to Xerxes. Herodotus in his account of he father's conduct relates, that the son in after ime was killed by the Plataeans, when at the ead of four hundred men and occupying their ity. (Herod. vii. 233.) This is, no doubt, the ame event which Thucydides (ii. 1–7) records s the first overt act of the Peloponnesian war, I. c. 431. The number of men was by his account only a little more than three hundred, nor was Eurymachus the actual commander, but the enterprise lad been negotiated by parties in Plataea through lim, and the conduct of it would therefore no loubt be entrusted very much to him. The amily was clearly one of the great aristocratical louses. Thucydides (ii. 2) calls Eurymachus “a man of the greatest power in Thebes.” [A. H. C.] EURYMEDE (EUpuujöm), the name of two mythical personages. [GLAUCUs ; MELEAGER.] EURY’MEDON (Eöpvuéðav). 1. A Cabeirus, son of Hephaestus and Cabeiro, and a brother of Alcon. (Nonn. Dionys. xiv. 22; Cic. de Nat. Deor. iii. 21.) 2. One of the attendants of Nestor. iii. 114, xi. 620.) 3. A son of Ptolemaeus, and charioteer of Agamemnon ; his tomb was shewn at Mycenae. (Hom. sl. iv. 228; Paus. ii. 16. S 5.) There are two more mythical personages of this name. (IIom. Od. rii. 58; Apollod. iii. 1. § 2.) Eurymedon signifies a oeing ruling far and wide, and occurs as a surname if several divinities, such as Poseidon (Pind. Ol. wiii. 31), Perseus (Apollon. Rhod. iv. 1514), and Hermes. (Hesych. s.v.) [L. S.] EURY'MEDON (Eöpvuéðav), a son of Thucles, un Athenian general in the Peloponnesian war, held in its fifth year, B. c. 428, the command of ixty ships, which the Athenians, on hearing of he intestine troubles of Corcyra, and the movement of the Peloponnesian fleet under Alcidas and Brasidas to take advantage of them, hastily depatched to maintain their interest there. This, it was found, had already been secured by Nicostraus with a small squadron from Naupactus. Eurynedon, however, took the chief command; and the even days of his stay at Corcyra were marked by he wildest cruelties inflicted by the commons on heir political opponents. These were no doubt oncouraged by the presence of so large an Athenian orce: how far they were personally sanctioned, or low far they could have been checked by Eurynedon, can hardly be determined. (Thuc. iii. 80, 1, 85.) In the following summer he was united with Iipponicus in command of the whole Athenian orce by land, and, co-operating with a fleet under Nicias, ravaged the district of Tanagra, and obained sufficient success over some Thebans and Tanagraeans to justify a trophy. (Thuc. iii. 91.)

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At the end of this campaign, he was appointed one of the commanders of the large reinforcements destined for Sicily, and early in B. c. 425 set saiv with forty ships, accompanied by his colleague Sophocles, and by Demosthenes also, in a private capacity, though allowed to use the ships for any purpose he pleased on the coast of Peloponnesus. They were ordered to touch at Corcyra on their way, and information of the arrival there of a Peloponnesian squadron made the commanders so anxious to hasten thither, that it was against their will, and only by the accident of stormy weather, that Demosthenes contrived to execute his project of fortifying Pylos. [DEMostileNES.] This however, once completed, had the effect of recalling the enemy from Corcyra : their sixty ships passed unnoticed by Eurymedon and Sophocles, then in Zacynthus, and made their way to Pylos, whither on intelligence from Demosthenes, the Athenian squadron presently pursued them. Here they appear to have remained till the capture of the Spartans in the island; and after this, proceeded to Corcyra to execute their original commission of reducing the oligarchical exiles, by whose warfare from the hill Istone the city was suffering severely, In this they succeeded : the exiles were driven from their fortifications, and surrendered on condition of being judged at Athens, and remaining, till removal thither, in Athenian custody; while, on the other hand, by any attempt to escape they should be considered to forfeit all terms. Into such an attempt they were treacherously inveigled by their countrymen, and handed over in consequence by the Athenian generals to a certain and cruel death at the hands of their betrayers. This shameful proceeding was encouraged, so Thucydides expressly states, by the evident reluctance of Surymedon and Sophocles to allow other hands than their own to present their prizes at Athens, while they should be away in Sicily. To Sicily they now proceeded; but their movements were presently put an end to by the general pacification effected under the influence of Hermocrates, to which the Athenian commanders themselves, with their allies, were induced to accede. For this, on their return to Athens, the people, ascribing the defeat of their ambitious schemes to corruption in their officers, condemned two of them to banishment, visiting Eurymedon, who perhaps had shown more reluctance than his colleagues, with the milder punishment of a fine. (Thuc. iii. 115, iv. 2–8, 13, 46–48, 65.)

Eurymedon is not known to have held any other command till his appointment at the end of B. c. 414, in conjunction with Demosthenes, to the command of the second Syracusan armament. He himself was sent at once, after the receipt of Nicias's letter, about mid-winter, with a supply of money and the news of the intended reinforcements: in the spring he returned to meet Demosthenes at Zacynthus. Their subsequent joint proceedings belong rather to the story of his more able colleague. In the night attack on Epipolae he took a share, and united with Demosthenes in the subsequent representations to Nicias of the necessity for instant departure. II is career was ended in the first of the two sea fights. Ilis command was on the right wing, and while endeavouring by the extension of his line to outflank the enemy, he was, by the defeat of the Athenian centre, cut off and surrounded in the recess of the harbour, his

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