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DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS :

-TO WIT.

DISTRICT CLERK'S OFFICE. BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the third day of November, A D. 1825, and in the fiftieth year of the Independence of the Vited States of America, John LAURIS BLAKE, of the said District, ha h deposited in this office, the title of a book, the right whereof he cla ms as Proprietor, in the words following, viz.

« The Historical Reader, designed for the use of Schools and Fami. lies . On a new plan. By Rev. J. L. Blake, A. M. Minister of St. Marthew's Church, and Principal of a Literary Seminary, Boston. “ History serves to amuse the imagination; to interest the passions ; to iinprove the understanding; and to strengthen the sentiments of virtue and piety."

In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, ontitled, “ An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books to the Authors and Propietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned :"-and also to an Act, entitled, An Act supplementary to an act, entitled, “ An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned; and extending the benefits there. of to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints." JNO. W. DAVIS,

Clerk of the District of

Massachusetts,

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PREFACE.

The object of this volume is to enable young persons, when loarn. ing to read at school, to acquire a knowledge of some of the most interesting and useful portions of history. A book consisting chiefly of extracts filled with real incidents, which equal, if not surpass, the most successful efforts of imagination in romance, cannot fail to captirate the attention of youth; and it is moreover believed, that few thus made acquainted with the extraordinary events described in the Historical Reader, will have so little curiosity, were there no other motive to influence them, as not to be inspired with a strong desire for further reading on this important subject--that few, at least, will have so little curiosity as not to fill up the chasms, connecting together the prominent parts here given.

It may possibly be apprehended by some, that a book, like the :: Historical Reader, which contains accounts of battles, massacres, and

other tragical scenes, will cause young persons, especially, to place a false estimate on human conduct-that, in the same degree as they thence fail duly to appreciate real goodness, they will become the less inclined to it; and in the same degree as they become familiar. ized with vice, they will view it with less abhorrence, and will conBequently be the less secured against temptations to it. The Author would not deny that this may sometimes be the case; but he does maintain, that there is no necessary tendency in history, to produce these deleterious effects in the human character. Those who read history, must blame themselves or their teachers, if suitable moral reflections are not made as they pass along. If history were studied as it ought, the most tragical relations which disfigure its ensanguin. ed pages might be made conducive to our instruction. If we did but reflect on the tears of the widows and orphans, and imagine ourselves to hear the groans of the wounded and dying; if we represented to ourselves the splendid and warlike appearance of an army, at its first taking the field, contrasted with the distressful spectacle of its shatBered remains, after a hard fought batile, or a bloody campaigo; we

would be thunderstruck at the reflection, and contemplate with hor. ror the dreadful effects of the human passions, instead of being greatly dazzled with what is called martial glory, and unduly inspired with love for the praise usually bestowed on it in history.

The names of the several persons from whose writings extracts have been made in this work, are not annexed to those extracts, be. cause in some instances the same article has been taken from differ. ent writers, and in other instances the phraseology has been partially altered—the former of which renders the giving of names inconve. niont, and the latter might be considered an act of injustice, inasmuch as it would ascribo to the individuals named what is not properly their own. The Author, however, aiming to let the work possess as much variety of style as possibly consistent with his main plan, has avoided introducing his own phraseology, in many instances, where the extracts made are evidently susceptible of improvement in this particular. Indeed, it has been found difficult, if not impossible, to obtain that variety, connected with that approved excellency of style, which is practicable in a collection of extracts on moro mise cellaneous subjects. The best class of writers on history is comparatively small; and the subject admits also only a comparatively small rhetorical diversification of language. The Author nevertheless in. dulges the belief, that this compilation is not greatly wanting in that variety and excellency of style which are of the first importance in books for the use of schools; and, that it will be found well calculated to inspire the youthful mind with a desire for more extensive and connected reading on this useful and interesting subject.

d. L. BLAKE.

INDEX.

PAOK

9
12
15
ib.
18
22

THE CREATION
Paradise
An Evening in Paradiso
The Deluge
The Antediluvians
The World contemplated at a Distance
The Tower of Babel
The Assyrians
The Ruins of Babylon
The Egyptians
The Egyptian Pyramids
The Falling Tower
The River Nile
The Progress of Writing
The Trojan War
Battle of Thermopyle
Socrates
The Social State
Battle of Marathon
Seneca
Patriotism
The Carthaginians
The Warrior's Wreath
Solomon's Temple
Revolt of the Ten Tribes
Israel's Return from Egypt
The Grateful Princess
Julius Cæsar and Pompey
Battle of Pharsalia
The World a Fleeting Show
Death of Antony
Death of Cleopatra
The Captive Lady
Death of Cæsar
Catiline's Conspiracy
The Tears of Judah
Destruction of Jerusalem
Order of Nature
The Fall of Rome
Rise of Mahometanism
Empire of China

26
29
31
34
36
37
39
41
44
48
52
52
55
58
ib.

68
69
74
76
81
ib.
85
88

89
92

95
i.
103
104
108
110

PAG

116
117
118
122
126
132
136
137
142
143
152
153
156
157
161
162
169
170
175
178
181
188
196
197
201

ib.
209
213
214
218
219
222
224
226
232
238
241
242
247
257
258
261
268
269
271
272
276
278
284
286
291
296

Charles V. Emperor of Germany
Mahomet
The Feudal System
The Crusades
Chivalry
The Reformation
Translation of the Bible
The Dungeon
Patriots and Martyrs
The Order of Jesuits
An Evening Sketch
Martyrs of Armurian
Morning Hlymn
Siege of Calais
Uncertainty of the World
Massacre of Swedish Nobility
A Summer's Morn
Joan of Arc
Discovery of America
The Times of Old
Capture of Montezunia
Conquest of Mexico
Victory
William Wallace
The Exile
Robert Bruce
Mary Queen of Scots
Fall of Jericho -
Charles I. of England
The Ruins
Gun-Powder Treason
Disappointed Ambition
The Aged Prisoner
The Inquisition
Plymouth Colony
The Indian Princess
The World at Rest
Settlement of Rhode Island
Settlement of Pennsylvania
Liberty
Capture of Mrs. Duston
New England Witchcraft
Peter the Great
General Oglethorpe
Benjamin Franklin
Destruction of Tea at Boston
First American Congress
Battle of Bunker's Hill
Burning of Charlestown
General Lyman
Excision of Wyoming
New-England

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