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READING AND SPEAKING.

LESSON XXVIII.

1. PROVERBS OF DIFFERENT NATIONS.

Latin.-

What is not needful ' is dear ' at a farthing. Italian.—There is no worse robber | than a bad book.

Spanish. The robes of lawyers / are lined with the obstinacy of suitors.

One fáther can support ten children: ten children | cannot support one father.

Turkish.—It is easy to go afoot, when one leads one's horse by the bridle.

Curses, like chickens, always come home to roost.

German.—Charity 'gives itself rìch ; cóvetousness | hoards itself poor.

English.--He who says what he likes, shall héar | what he does not like.

No páins, no gàins—no sweat, no sweet.

2. BREVITY AND CLEARNESS.

An old woman, that showed a house and pictures at Towester, expressed herself in these words : “ This is Sir Richard Farmer; he lived in the country, took care of his estate, built this house and paid for it, managed it well, saved money, and died rich. That is his son ; he was made a lord, took a place at court, spent his estate, and died a beggar.” Here clearness and brevity are both united-qualities in language the most important, and the most difficult.

3. POLITENESS.

He that is truly 'polite, knows how to contradict with respect, and to please without adulation ; and is èqually remote from an insipid complaisance, and a low familiarity.

4. EASIER TO KNOW THAN TO Do.

If to do, were as easy as to know what were good to dó; chapels I had been churches, and poor men's cottages | princes' palaces. He is a good ' divine | who follows his own instructions : I can more easily teach twenty | what were good to be done, than be one of the twenty ' to follow my own teaching.

5. PLEASING DESCRIPTION.

The poet's eye / in a fine phrensy rolling,
Doth glance ' from heaven to earth, from earth to

heaven,
And ' as imagination bodies forth'
The form of things unknown, the poet's pen |
Turns them to shàpe, and gives to airy nothing |
A local habitation and a name.

6. SUBLIME DESCRIPTION.

The cloud-capt towers, the gorgeous pálaces,
The solemn témples, the great globe itself,
Yea, all which it inhèrits, shall dissolve,
And, like the baseless fabric of a vísion,
Leave not a wreck ' behind! we are such stuff!
As dreams are made of, and our little life i
Is rounded' with a sleep.

7. VALUE OF COMMON SENSE.

Fine sense
I and exalted sense

1

are not half so valuable as common sense. There are fórty men of sense ' for one man of wit : and he that will

carry

nothing about with him but gold, will be every day at a loss for ready change.

8. THE WOLF AND CRANE.

A wolf' with too much eagerness, swallowed a bóne; which, unfortunately, stuck in his throat. In the violence of his pain, he applied to several animals, earnestly entreating them to extract it. None of them dared hazard the dangerous experiment, but the cràne ; who, persuaded by his solemn promises of a compensation, ventured to thrust her enormous length of neck down his throat; and, having successfully performed the operation, claimed the recompense.

“Sêe ' how unreasonable some creatures ' àre,” said the wolf; "have I not suffered thee safely 'to draw thy neck out of my jaws, and hast thou the cónscience to demand a fúrther' reward ? "

By this fable, it is shown, that the utmost extent of sóme men's gratitude, is barely to refrain from oppressing' and injuring 'their benefactors.

9. The Fox AND RAVEN.

A fox observing a ráven perched on the branch of a tree, with a fine piece of chéese in his mouth, immediately began to consider ! how he might possèss | so delicate a morsel.

“Dear ' màdam,” said he, “I am extremely glad ' to have the pleasure of seèing ' you this morning ; your beautiful shape and shining feathers | are the delight of my eyes." “ Would you condescend to favor me with a song? I doubt not but your voice | is equal to the rest of your accomplishments.”

Deluded by this flattering speech, the transported raven opened her mouth' to give him a specimen of her pipe, when down dropped the cheese, which the fox instantly snatched up, and bore away in triumph ; leaving the raven to lament her credulous vanity 1 at her leisure.

The moral of the fable appears to be this : wherever fáttery 'gains admission, it seems to banish common

sense.

10. DOMESTIC ENJOYMENT.

What ' a smiling aspect does the love of parents and children, of brothers and sisters, of friends and relations, give ' to every surrounding object, and every returning day! With what a lustre | does it gild even the small ' habitation, where this placid intercourse I

dwells ! where such scenes of heartfelt satisfaction ! succeed uninterruptedly' to one another.

11. God's BENEVOLENT DESIGNS.

How many clear' marks of benevolent intention! appear every where around us !

What a profusion of beauty and ornament 'is poured forth on the face of nàture! What a magnificent spectacle presented to the view of màn! What a supply | contrived for his wants ! What a variety of objects set before him, to gratify his senses, to employ his understanding, to entertain his imagination, to chéer and gladden ' his heart !

12. TIME, AN ESTATE.

An Italian philosopher' expressed in his motto, that “time I was his estàte.” An estate, indeed, which will produce nothing' without cultivation ; but which will always abúndantly repay the labors of industry, and satisfy the most extensive desires, if no part of it be suffered to lie waste by negligence, to be overrun with noxious plánts, or laid out for show rather than use.

13. HOPE OF FUTURE HAPPINESS.

The hope of future happiness ' is a perpetual source of consolation 'to good mén. Under trouble, it soothes their minds ; amidst temptation, it supports their virtue ; and, in their dying moments, enables them to say, “O' death! whère ' is thy sting? O gráve ! whère ' is thy victory ?

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