Chronicling Cultures: Long-term Field Research in Anthropology

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Robert V. Kemper, Anya Peterson Royce
Rowman Altamira, 2002 - 353 ページ
Some field sites have hosted anthropologists for as long as half a century. Chronicling Cultures collects articles from principals of many of the longest and best-known anthropology projects from four continents--the Kung, Harvard Chiapas Project, Gwembe Valley, Tzintzuntzan, and Navajo among others. These projects have brought a new understanding of change and persistence in communities over time. They have forced researchers to develop methods of involving local communities in research, of using data over generations of scholars, and of resolving ethical issues of research versus advocacy. The projects range from individual scholars who return "home" year after year to large-scale institutionalized projects involving many researchers and numerous studies. This volume will be an important addition to the literature on fieldwork, on the history of ethnology, and on ethnographers' role in their host cultures.
 

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目次

Learning to See Learning to Listen ThirtyFive Years of Fieldwork with the Isthmus Zapotec
6
Katutura and Namibia The People the Place and the Fieldwork
32
Mysore Villages Revisited
57
Collaborative LongTerm Ethnography and Longitudinal Social Analysis of a Nomadic Clan in Southeastern Turkey
79
LARGESCALE PROJECTS
99
The LongTerm Study among the Navajo
106
The Harvard Chiapas Project 19572000
133
Local Cultures and Global Systems The JuhoansiKung and Their Ethnographers Fifty Years On
158
LongTerm Research in Gwembe Valley Zambia
195
Multigenerations and Multidisciplines Inheriting Fifty Years of Gwembe Tonga Research
237
A Half Century of Field Research in Tzintzunzan Mexico A Personal View
250
From Student to Steward Tzintzunzan as Extended Community
282
Being the Third Generation in Tzintzunzan
311
Index
327
About the Contributors
347
著作権

PASSING THE MANTLE MULTIGENERATIONAL PROJECTS
189

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xii ページ - ... Science, is formed by the meeting of two orders of experience. One order is constituted by the direct, immediate discriminations of particular observations. The other order is constituted by our general way of conceiving the Universe. They will be called, the Observational Order, and the Conceptual Order. The first point to remember is that the observational order is invariably interpreted in terms of the concepts supplied by the conceptual order.
xi ページ - ... his predecessors, Malinowski did not write descriptions at the level of culture, custom, ritual, and belief. He dealt instead with how people grew up in a society of a particular culture, and how they used and rebelled against that culture.

著者について (2002)

Kemper is professor of anthropology at Southern Methodist University. Royce is professor of anthropology at Indiana University.

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