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« One thrust of thine outrageous horn

Has guld the kniglit so sore, That to the church-yard he is borne,

To range our glens no more.»

An Austrian noble left the stour,

And fast the tight gan take; And he arrived in luckless lour

At Sempach on the lake.

He and his squire a fisher calla

(llis name was llans Vou Rot), « For love, or ineed, or charity,

Receive us in thiy boat.

Their anxious call the fisher heard,

And, glad the meed to win, His shallop to the shore he sleerd,

And took the flyers in.

And while against the tide and wind

Hans stoully row'd his way, The noble to his followers sign'd

He should the boatman slay.

The original of these verses occurs in a German popular songs, entitled Sammlur Volkslieder, Brolin, 1807, published by Mex and Von der Hagen, both, and more espec distinguished for their acquaintance with popular poetry and legendary history of i

In the German editor's notice of the stated to have been extracted from Chronicle of Nicolaus Thomand, chaplain in Weisenhorn, which bears the date a song is stated by the author to liave been in the neighbourhood at that early perit as quoted by the German editor, seer have believed the event he narrates. I stones and obituaries to prove the existe sonages of the ballad, and discovers tually d ed on the lith May, 1349, a Lar'. Countess of Marstetten, who was by bit of Moringer. This lady lie supposes to ringer's daughter mentioned in the bal the same authority for the death of Neuffen in the same year. The editors seem to embrace the opinion of Prof. Ulm, who, from the language of the ba date to the 15th century.

The legend itself turns on an inciden Germany, and which perhaps was not pen in more instances than one, when long in the Iloly Land, and their discos ceived no tidings of their fate. A stor circumstances, but without the mirar of Saint Thomas, is told of one of these Haigh-hall, in Lancashire, the patrimon the late Countess of Balcarras; and represented on stained glass upon ancient manor-house.

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Tuese verses are a literal translation of an ancient Ss. ballad upon the battle of Sempach, fought oth Ju's, 1386, being the victory by which the Swiss cantos e tablished their independence. The author is Abe Tchudi, denominated the Souter, from his profession et a shoemaker. He was a citizen of Lucerne, esteem highly among his countrymen, both for his powersta Meister-singer or minstrel, and his courage as a sadier; so that he might share the praise conferred by Collins on Eschylus, that

Not alone be nursed the poet's fame,

But reach'd from Virtue's hand the patriot steel The circumstance of their being written by a part returning from the well-fought field he describes, in wbich his country's fortune was secured, may conheur on Tchudi's verses an interest which they are not titled to claim from their poetical merit. Bat bear poetry, the more literally it is translated, the more i loses its simplicity, without acquiring either grace strength; and therefore some of the faults of the 64138 must be imputed to the translator's feeling it a duty keep as closely as possible to his original. The rare. puns, rude attempts at pleasantry, and disproportion episodes, must be set down to Tchudi's account, or * the taste of his age.

The military antiquary will derive some amuseme-. from the minute particulars which the martial poet who recorded. The mode in which the Austrian ame4arms received the charge of the Swiss was by forme. phalanx, which they defended with their long lan The gallant Winkelried, who sacrificed his owa lile." rushing among the spears, clasping in his arms as 1823 as he could grasp, and thus opening a gap in these? battalions, is celebrated in Swiss history. When fsä mingled together, the unwieldy length of their wet pons, and cumbrous weight of their defensive arm rendered the Austrian men-at-arms a very wellmatch for the light-armed mountaineers. The victor obtained by the Swiss over the German chivalry, therto deemed as formidable on foot as oa borsrh. led to important changes in the art of war. The police describes the Austrian knights and squires as cur the peaks from their boots ere they could act liput foot, in allusion to an inconvenient piece of foppring often mentioned in the middle ages. Leopold i

With many a shriek and cry whiz round

The birds of midnight scared; And rusting like autumnal leaves,

Unhallow'd ghosts were heard.

O'er many a tomb and tomb-stone pale

He spurr'd the fiery horse, Till sudden at an open grave

He check'd the wondrous course.

The falling gauntlet quits the rein,

Down drops the casque of steel, The cuirass leaves his shrinking side,

The spur his gory heel.

The eyes desert the naked skull,

The mouldering flesh the bone, Till Helen's lily arms entwine

A ghastly skeleton.

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« One thrust of thine outrageous horn

Has guld the kniglic so sore, That to the church-yard he is borne,

To range our glens no more.»

An Austrian noble left the stour,

And fast the ti;ht gan take; And be arrived in luckless lour

At Sempach on the lake.

He and his squire a fisher callid

(llis pame was llans Von Rot), « For love, or meed, or charity,

Receive us in thy boat.is

Their anxious call the fisher heard,

And, glad the meed to win, His shallop to the shore lie steerd,

And took the flyers in.

And while against the tide and wind

Hans stoutly row'd his way, The noble to his followers signd

He should the boatman slay.

The original of these verses occurs in a collection et German popular songs, entitled Sammlung Deutschen Volkslieder, Berlin, 1807, published by Messrs busctar. and Von der Hagen, both, and more especially the distinguished for thrir acquaintance with the ancient popular poetry and legendary history of Germany.

In the German editor's notice of the ballad, it x stated to have been extracted from a maon.com Chronicle of Nicolaus Thomano, chaplain to St Lesasi in Weisenhorn, which bears tlie date 1533; and the song is stated by the author to have been generali , in the neighbourhood at that early period. The as quoted by the German editor, seems faithfatione tot have believed the event he narrates. le quotes stones and obituaries to prove the existence of the print sonages of the ballad, and discovers that there tually d ed on the 11th May, 1349, a Lady Voa Neuf Countess of Marstetten, who was by birth of the houe of Moriager. This lady le supposes to have beco bom rieger's daughter mentioned in the ballad. He qw=2* ! the same authority for the death of Berckhold Neuffen in the same year. The editors, on the whol, 1 seem to embrace the opinion of Professor Sale Ulm, who, from the language of the ballad, ascnbe date to the 15th century.

The legend itself turns on an incident not peculia" Germany, and which perhaps was not unlikely to brin pen in more instances than one, wben crusaders aber long in the lloly Laod, and their disconsolate dame ceived no tidings of their fate. A story very similar in circumstances, but without the miraculous machine of Saint Thomas, is told of one of the ancient lords ad Haigh-ball, in Lancashire, the patrimonial inheritance of the late Countess of Balcarras; and the particularsane represented on stained glass upon a window in that ancient manor house.

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