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avoidance of a common error, and the lesson then proceeds as before. This is not given as the form in which a class should recite, but as a good form under some conditions.

If we had visited this same class some time earlier in the term we would have found that instead of a part of the class writing answers to a question dictated near the commencement of the recitation that part would have been sent to the black-board to draw in ten minutes time a map of the Mediterranean Sea.

Review work in Geography as in every other subject ought to be a fresh attack upon it from a new stand-point, or at least a recasting of the form in which it is presented. As in the first study of the subject the memory was not (or ought not to be) especially appealed to, so equally in review when the mind is supposed to have the subject fairly well in hand, it should show the strength with which it grasps the subject by setting it forth in new relations. To say, “Take it over again” is no way to assign a review.

The special utility of the topic “Resemblances and Contrasts” is the constant review and comparison it secures. If the rivers of Africa are compared with those of South America in any thoughtsul way it recalls all knowledge in the mind of these rivers and confirms this knowledge not merely by recalling it, but by the mind's putting its impress upon it by trying to use it and fit it to its own purpose.

A good form for review would be to take one of the topics for the study of a continent or a country and recall and restate what has been learned upon that topic in each country studied. If as the facts are stated anew their agreement or variation be shown, both unity of knowledge and clearness of apprehension will be gained. It is useless to attempt so full a study of what may be termed minutiæ of geography that one shall be ready at any time to locate all the places he may meet with in his reading.

As we are advised to read dictionary at hand so we must learn to read atlas at hand. Whenever events bring any question of the globe into prominence then the localities in that section must be studied up by those who would read intelligently. How many have studied anew the geography of Soudan, of Corea, of Bulgaria, of the Saskatchewan region during the past twelve months, and it is not at all to the discredit of their geographical knowledge that they have been obliged to do so.

The course of study in geography in any school ought to be so light and flexible as to admit of being turned aside for a week or two at a time as the light of some new interest falls on the mountains of this or that land.

All classes in geography of suitable advancement ought to have studied Birmah and its relations to the other states of Indo-China during the last month because of the events therein taking place. Just now Samoa ought to be looked up and something learned about it, though it be not in the course.

Such things do something to increase the connection of the school-room with the world at large and enable us to form habits of investigation that will do much towards making our pupils intelligent.

CAUSES OF FEEBLE HEALTH IN WOMEN.

Much has been said of late years concerning the lack of health in women. Wise physicians have written concerning it at length, and have declared it to be one of the most melancholy signs of the times. Women themselves, however, have neglected the question to a degree that might almost be reckoned criminal, especially that class to whom are entrusted the physical wellbeing of the women of the future—the mothers.

In a circular to parents, recently sent out by the Association of Collegiate Alumnæ, the following summary of causes for the feeble health of women and girls, is published. The attention of parents and teachers generally is called to them:

1. Social dissipation and excitement, which is neither amusement nor recreation. Girls are too often stimulated to shine socially and intellectually at the same time. A mother proves her daughter's perfect health by saying: “She has been able to go to parties or entertainments four or five evenings a week all winter, and she stands at the kead of her class.”

Habitual loss of sufficient and healthy sleep. In a New York academy, a class of sixty girls, between the ages of twelve and eighteen, chanced to be asked by a recent visitor for the time they retired the night before. The average was found to be twenty minutes before midnight; but no surprise was manifested by the teachers, nor regret by the scholars,

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3. Irregularity and haste in taking food, the use of confectionery in the evening, and the omission of breakfast. The principal of a large girl's school in Philadelphia lately said that so many habitually came to school without having sufficient breakfast, and taking little or no lunch, that he had been compelled, in order to obtain good mental work, to have warm lunch furnished, and to insist upon every scholar taking it in the middle of the morning.

4. Tight, heavy, or insufficient clothing, which frightfully increases the tendency to consumptive and spinal diseases. A physician of wide experience confidently states that this cause alone has incapacitated more women than over-study and overwork of all kinds.

5. The lack of sufficient out-door exercise. When a proper amount of time is devoted to such exercises, no time will be left for over-study.

6. The ambition of parents and daughters to accomplish much in little time, which sends students to college either hurri. edly and imperfectly prepared, or with a thorough preparation gained at the expense of health.

7. The usual postponement of instruction in the laws of physiology and hygiene to a college course. The Association recommends the introduction of a thorough course of physical training, with special instructors and lectures on the subject.

FORMS AND METHODS IN ARITHMETIC-V.

W. F. L. SANDERS, SUPT, SCHOOLS CAMBRIDGE CITY.

[CONCLUDED.] 105. What will a draft for $3500 cost, payable 30 days after date, bank discount at 6%, exchange %2% premium.

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and it is not at all to the discredit of their geographical knowledge that they have been obliged to do so.

The course of study in geography in any school ought to be so light and flexible as to admit of being turned aside for a week or two at a time as the light of some new interest falls on the mountains of this or that land.

All classes in geography of suitable advancement ought to have studied Bırmah and its relations to the other states of Indo-China during the last month because of the events therein taking place. Just now Samoa ought to be looked up and something learned about it, though it be not in the course.

Such things do something to increase the connection of the school-room with the world at large and enable us to form habits of investigation that will do much towards making our pupils intelligent.

CAUSES OF FEEBLE HEALTH IN WOMEN. Much has been said of late years concerning the lack of health in women. Wise physicians have written concerning it at length, and have declared it to be one of the most melancholy signs of the times. Women themselves, however, have neglected the question to a degree that might almost be reckoned criminal, especially that class to whom are entrusted the physical wellbeing of the women of the future—the mothers.

In a circular to parents, recently sent out by the Association of Collegiate Alumnæ, the following summary of causes for the feeble health of women and girls, is published. The attention of parents and teachers generally is called to them:

1. Social dissipation and excitement, which is neither amusement nor recreation. Girls are too often stimulated to shine socially and intellectually at the same time. A mother proves her daughter's perfect health by saying: “She has been able to go to parties or entertainments four or five evenings a week all winter, and she stands at the kead of her class.”

2. Habitual loss of sufficient and healthy sleep. In a New York academy, a class of sixty girls, between the ages of twelve and eighteen, chanced to be asked by a recent visitor for the time they retired the night before. The average was found to be twenty minutes before midnight; but no surprise was manifested by the teachers, nor regret by the scholars,

3. Irregularity and haste in taking food, the use of confectionery in the evening, and the omission of breakfast. The principal of a large girl's school in Philadelphia lately said that so many habitually came to school without having sufficient breakfast, and taking little or no lunch, that he had been compelled, in order to obtain good mental work, to have warm lunch furnished, and to insist upon every scholar taking it in the middle of the morning.

4. Tight, heavy, or insufficient clothing, which frightfully increases the tendency to consumptive and spinal diseases. A physician of wide experience confidently states that this cause alone has incapacitated more women than over-study and overwork of all kinds.

5. The lack of sufficient out-door exercise. When a proper amount of time is devoted to such exercises, no time will be left for over-study.

6. The ambition of parents and daughters to accomplish much in little time, which sends students to college either hurri. edly and imperfectly prepared, or with a thorough preparation gained at the expense of health.

7. The usual postponement of instruction in the laws of physiology and hygiene to a college course. The Association recommends the introduction of a thorough course of physical training, with special instructors and lectures on the subject.

FORMS AND METHODS IN ARITHMETIC-V.

W. F. L. SANDERS, SUPT. SCHOOLS CAMBRIDGE CITY.

[CONCLUDED.) 105. What will a draft for $3500 cost, payable 30 days after date, bank discount at 6%, exchange 172 % premium.

FORM OF WORK.

Par . .
Premium

$1.00

.015

Cost, per $1, at sight

$1.015

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