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Officers of the Art Section were: President, J. M. Ordway, of Louisiana; Vice-President, J. A. Wickershan, of Indiana ; Treasurer, J. D. Walters, of Kansas. Walter S. Perry, of Massachusetts, was elected President of the Art Department. Of the Elementary Department, W. H. Bartholomew, of Kentucky, was elected President, and Mrs. Sutherland, of Ohio, Secretary.

Of the normal section A. R. Taylor, of Kansas, State Normal, was re-elected President, and Mary E. Nicholson, of the Indianapolis Training School, was elected Secretary.

At the close of the Association large numbers of teachers availed themselves of the cheap railroad rates to visit various parts of the "great West." Several hundred went to California, and not less than a thousand went to Colorado and the Rocky Mountains.

The Santa Fe route got the lion's share of the western tourists, because it passes through the best part of Kansas, and gives the most attractive mountain scenery. The Denver & Rio Grande road, which is a part of this route, runs from Pueblo to Denver, a distance of 120 miles, in sight of the mountains the most of the time. Colorado Springs and Manitou, on this line, are at the foot of Pike's Peak, and are near several beautiful canons and noted springs, the Garden of the Gods, etc. This is one of the most attractive parts in this region of wonderful scenery. The writer, in company with several other Hoosiers, climbed to the top of Pike's Peak, which is one of the highest points of the Rockies--more than 14,000 feet above sea level.

A WORD PERSONAL-READ. The Journal is now in its thirty-first volume. For more than thirty years it has been fighting the battles of education. Not a forward movement in any department of the great work has been made in all this time in which the Journal's influence has not been felt. It has advocated every good cause and opposed every bad one.

No other educational paper-nor all others combined—have done so much, nor are doing so much, nor can do so much for Indiana teachers as is the Indiana School Journal. No outside paper can know Indiana's interests, or advocate them with the intelligence or effect of a home paper that has a personal interest in everything that happens. Therefore, other things being equal, Indiana teachers should stand by their life-long friend, and patronize their own journal.

That the Journal is meeting the demands of the times is evinced by the fact that it has to-day a larger circulation than ever before, and never before received such hearty commendations from the best teachers of the State.

The Journal is determined to keep abreast the best thought of the day. To this end it employs an abler corps of department editors than any other educational paper in the United States. With S. S. Parr, Principal of the DePauw Normal, at the head of the Pedagogical De partment; Geo. F. Bass, Supervising Principal and Critic Teacher in the Indianapolis schools, in charge of the Practical School-Room Department; and Howard Sandison, Professor of the Science of Teaching and Principal of the Model Department of the State Normal School, in charge of the Primary Department, and with an able corps of general contributors, the Journal can not fall below a very high standard of excellence.

As primary work underlies all other work, it is made a specialty: Besides making the Primary the largest department, primary articles are often found in each of the other departments and in the main body of the Journal. It is safe to say that with but a single exception, no other educational paper in the United States gives so much space to primary work. Neither time nor money will be spared to make the Journal just what the teachers need.

ELEVATIONS ABOVE THE SEA.

700 feet.

Lake county,

(average) Steuben county,

1040 Switzerland county,

750
Posey county, (the lowest)

450
Marion county,
(average)

750
Brown county,

950
Randolph county, (the highest)

IIOO
Union Depot, Indianapolis,

721
Surface of Lake Michigan,

585 Low water in the Ohio at New Albany,

375 Evansville,

326 the mouth of the Wabash,

313 Northwest quarter of the State (average)

700 Northeast quarter of the State

875 Southeast quarter of the State

780 Southwest quarter of the State

593 Average for the entire State

735

TENURE OF OFFICE A STEP IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION.

Massachusetts now has a law which provides that “The School Committee of any city or town may elect their teachers to serve for a term of years, or during good behavior.” This is a step in the right direction. The law should be made to include Superintendents.

The worst thing against teaching as a profession is its insecurity. A teacher or Superintendent can not select his residence as other people do, and say here will I make my home. He is liable to be dropped at the end of any year for a trivial reason, or no reason.

This insecurity of tenure of place is driving out of the teachers' profession every year many of the most competent, because they are unwilling to run the annual gantlet for place.

With a suitable provison for the dismissal of a teacher at any time for incompetency or immorality, there is no reason why competent tried teachers should not be elected “ during good behavior.”

Under this regulation it would be a little more trouble to get rid of an incompetent teacher, but the compensating good to the competent masses demands that the change be made.

A MUNIFICENT LEGACY.

The late John Brewster, of Boston, has left a fortune of nearly a million dollars which is to be devoted to the establishment of “ Brewster's Academy,” to be located in his native town, Wolfboro, situated on Lake Winnepesaukee. A public library, reading room, lecture hall, etc., are provided for. Ultimately the annual income will be about $50,000.

Why do not more rich men in some such way perpetuate not simply their name, but their usefulness? Or, still better : Why do they not use their money in such enterprise while living, and thus enjoy, in this life, the fruits of their generosity? To hold on to money till one is dead and can't use it any longer, robs benevolence of half of its virtue.

ANOTHER CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION.

A resolution has been introduced in the United States Senate by Senator Gorham looking to the celebration at Washington, in 1889, of the centennial anniversary of the formation of the government under the Constitution, and of the four hundredth anniversary of the discovery of America in 1492.

GEMS OF THOUGHT.
Every one that flatters thee is no friend in misery.Barnfield.

" What's one man's poison

Is another's meat and drink.” What is becoming is honest, and whatever is honest must always be becoming.--Cicero.

Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested.-Bacon.

“Know then this truth, (enough for men to know,)
Virtue alone is happiness below."

-Pope. O that men should put an enemy in their mouth to steal away their brains.-Shakespeare.

No abilities, however splendid, can command success without intense labor and persevering application.-A. T. Stewart.

Be noble! and the nobleness that lies in other men, sleeping, but never dead, will rise in majesty to meet thine own.-Lowell.

“For forms of government let fools contest;

Whate'er is best administered is best.
For modes of faith let graceless zealots fight;
His can't be wrong whose life is in the right.” –Pope.

LUCK AND LABOR.

Luck doth wait, standing idly at the gate

Wishing, wishing all the day;
And at night, without a fire, without a light,

And before an empty tray,

Doth sadly say,
“To-morrow something may turn up;

To-night on wishes I must sup."
Labor goes plowing deep the fertile row,

Singing, singing all the day;
And at night, before the fire, beside the light,

And with a well-filled tray,

Doth gladly say,
" To-morrow I'll turn something up;
To-night on wages earned I'll sup.'

Among the pitfalls in our way,

The best of us walk blindly;
Oh, man! be wary, watch and pray,

And judge your neighbor kindly-
Help back his feet if they have slid,

And count him still your debtor-
Perhaps the wrong he did

Has made yourself the better.

Miss Mary E. WARNER has been teaching a primary select school in Danville for the past six years. A local paper in noticing the recent closing exercises says of Miss Warner: " She is the best primary teacher we have ever had in Danville."

people do, and say here will I make my home. He is liable to be dropped at the end of any year for a trivial reason, or no reason.

This insecurity of tenure of place is driving out of the teachers' profession every year many of the most competent, because they are unwilling to run the annual gantlet for place.

With a suitable provison for the dismissal of a teacher at any time for incompetency or immorality, there is no reason why competent tried teachers should not be elected during good behavior."

Under this regulation it would be a little more trouble to get rid of an incompetent teacher, but the compensating good to the competent masses demands that the change be made.

A MUNIFICENT LEGACY.

The late John Brewster, of Boston, has left a fortune of nearly a million dollars which is to be devoted to the establishment of “Brewster's Academy," to be located in his native town, Wolfboro, situated on Lake Winnepesaukee. A public library, reading room, lecture hall, etc., are provided for. Ultimately the annual income will be about $50,000.

Why do not more rich men in some such way perpetuate not simply their name, but their usefulness? Or, still better : Why do they not use their money in such enterprise while living, and thus enjoy, in this life, the fruits of their generosity? To hold on to money till one is dead and can't use it any longer, robs benevolence of half of its virtue.

ANOTHER CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION.

A resolution has been introduced in the United States Senate by Senator Gorham looking to the celebration at Washington, in 1889, of the centennial anniversary of the formation of the government under the Constitution, and of the four hundredth anniversary of the discovery of America in 1492.

GEMS OF THOUGHT.

Every one that flatters thee is no friend in misery.-Barnfield.

6. What's one man's poison

Is another's meat and drink." What is becoming is honest, and whatever is honest must always be becoming.-Cicero.

Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested.-Bacon.

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