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"Just as I thought," said the young M. D,

How easy it is to kill 'em !
Statistics ossified every fold

Of cerebrum and cerebellum."
“ It's a great curiosity, sure," said Pat;

By the bones you can tell the creature !"
“Oh! nothing strange," said the doctor, "that

Was a nineteenth-century teacher."

THE SCHOOL ROOM.

(This Department is conducted by Geo. F. Bass, Supervising Prin. Indianapolis schools.)

MOTTOES FOR THE SCHOOL-ROOM.

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I was once very fashionable to have mottoes in the schoolroom. When these mottoes mean something to the pupils ir

is well. “By their fruits ye shall know them.” One of the most careless schools in work that I ever saw had this inotto on the black-board in a permanent form: “What is worth doing at all is worth doing well.” The motto did not make the school careless; neither did it prevent the school from being careless. There was no teacher behind this motto. He did not impress his pupils with the spirit of doing their work well. He might have made a little talk on the value of doing work well the first time, and then have placed this motto on the board -or better, had the school commit it. Afterward, a mere reference to the motto would call up the whole discussion. This would, eventually, create a spirit of carefulness in the school.

But to place mottoes in the room or have the school learn them without getting the spirit of them is a mockery.

The opening exercises may frequently be used for work of this kind. Quotations may be given and discussed with great interest and profit to the pupils. Sir Philip Sidney said, “They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts.” They are not only not alone, but they are in good company. Some one has said that we are known by the company we keep. Certain it is we are liable to become much like our company.

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We change the company a little, while it may change us a great deal.

To have noble thoughts for our company, we must associate with the great and good. This is most easily done by means of their writings. These can be had for almost nothing. During a school year by using a part of the opening exercise time, the pupils might become somewhat acquainted with at least thirty of the good and noble that have lived and are yet living. In eight years of school life many such acquaintances might be made through these mottoes and quotations.

OPENING EXERCISES.

Ill habits gather by unseen degrees

As brooks make rivers, rivers run to seas. -Dryden. Habit is a cable, we weave a thread of it each day, and at last we can not break it.- Horace Mann.

WRITE these on the black-board and talk about them with the pupils. Talk with the pupils, not to them. Lead them to see the meaning of the above. Incidentally tell who Dryden and Horace Mann were, -when and where they lived. What kind of habits are referred to, good or bad? Are they formed suddenly? Are we conscious of forming these habits at the time they are formed? Are good habits formed in the same way that bad ones are? Can a habit be broken? Is it as easy to break a bad habit as a good one?

Such questions will bring out a discussion. Pupils will think about what these quotations mean. The pupils will be led to notice their own actions and guard themselves in the formation of habits,

Do not make a severe testing recitation of this kind of work. Be ready to say something on your own questions. The chances are that, at first, the pupils will be somewhat diffident. The teacher will need to say enough to get them interested. He will also need to see that certain notions are corrected. They may fail to properly interpret. For example, they may say a habit can not be broken, and refer to Horace Mann's saying as their authority. Here the teacher will need to explain. The author

was trying to impress us with the fact that habits were formed gradually, and that they could not be suddenly changed.

We may break a habit as we made it-by breaking a thread each day

ON PRONUNCIATION,

A COPY of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary was offered at a teachers' institute in Pennsylvania to any teacher who would read the following paragraph and pronounce every word correctly according to Webster. No one succeeded in earning the dictionary, although nine made the attempt. Any one will be surprised upon looking up each of the test words here given to find how many are commonly mispronounced :

“A sacrilegious son of Belial, who suffered from bronchitis, having exhausted his finances, in order to make good the deficit, resolved to ally himself to a comely young lady of the Malay or or Caucasian race. He accordingly purchased a calliope and a coral necklace of a chameleon hue, and securing a suite of rooms at the principal hotel, he engaged the head waiter as his coadjutor. He then dispatched a letter of the most unexceptionable caligraphy extant inviting the young lady to a matinee. She revolted at the idea, refused to consider herself sacrificeable to his desires, and sent a polite note of refusal; on receiving which he procured a carbine and bowie-knifie, said that he would not forge fetters hymeneal with the Queen, went to an isolated spot, seviered his jugular vein, and discharged the contents of his carbine into his abdomen. The debris was removed by the Coroner.” -Center Table.

OPENING EXERCISES.

TEACHER. Come here, Emma,- let me wrap this thread around your fingers. Can you break it? E. Yes ma'am.

Tr. Now I'll wrap it around twice. Harry, can you break it now? H. Yes ma'am.

Tr. Now I'll wrap it around a great many times. Now, Willie, can you break it? W. No ma'am.

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Tr. Now you see when I wrapped the thread around but once it did not hold your fingers tight at all, and you could move them as you pleased and break the thread: even when I had wrapped it around several times you could do the same, but not so easily. But when I had wrapped the thread around a great many times, it held your fingers tight and you could not break the thread at all.

Now I have done this to show you what I mean by forming habits. For instance, I want you to get into a habit of holding your pen right. You hold it right one day, but that doesn't make you do it again, any more than one string holds your fingers in one place. Still you are a little more apt to do it the next day, and then the next, and so on till you are so used to holding it right that you can hardly help it; then we say you are in the habit of doing it. Then it is as hard for you to change and do some other way as it was for you to break the strings and move your fingers as you pleased.

Now we can not help forming habits of some kind. What kind of habits do you think we had better form?

Ch. Good habits.

Tr. Can you think of some habits that are good ? Very well, to-morrow we will talk about some of them.

M. F.

AFTER SCHOOL.

Few practices of otherwise good teachers are so defenseless as “keeping pupils after school.” The habit once acquired is almost as difficult to break as any vicious tendency of life. We have heard no good argument in its favor. All progressive teachers, most supervisors, all normal schools, all pedagogical literature, all physicians, are arrayed against the practice, and yet some teachers cling to it with exasperating tenacity. With rare exceptions it is a failure as a punishment. It is vicious to have the pupils feel that they can afford to be idle, lazy, or playful in school hours, and make up for it at leisure afterward. The air of the school-room at such a time is unfit to breathe. The liability to disarrange home plans, to the annoyance of parents, was trying to impress us with the fact that habits were formed gradually, and that they could not be suddenly changed.

We may break a habit as we made it-by breaking a thread each day.

ON PRONUNCIATION

A COPY of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary was offered at a teachers' institute in Pennsylvania to any teacher who would read the following paragraph and pronounce every word correctly according to Webster. No one succeeded in earning the dictionary, although nine made the attempt. Any one will be surprised upon looking up each of the test words here given to find how many are commonly mispronounced :

A sacrilegious son of Belial, who suffered from bronchitis, having exhausted his finances, in order to make good the deficit, resolved to ally himself to a comely young lady of the Malay or or Caucasian race. He accordingly purchased a calliope and a coral necklace of a chameleon hue, and securing a suite of rooms at the principal hotel, he engaged the head waiter as his coadjutor. He then dispatched a letter of the most unexceptionable caligraphy extant inviting the young lady to a matinee. She revolted at the idea, refused to consider herself sacrificeable to his desires, and sent a polite note of refusal; on receiving which he procured a carbine and bowie-knifie, said that he would not forge fetters hymeneal with the Queen, went to an isolated spot, seviered his jugular vein, and discharged the contents of his carbine into his abdomen. The debris was removed by the Coroner." -Center Table,

OPENING EXERCISES.

TEACHER. Come here, Emma,- let me wrap this thread around your fingers. Can you break it? E. Yes ma'am.

Tr. Now I'll wrap it around twice. Harry, can you break it now? H. Yes ma'am.

Tr. Now I'll wrap it around a great many times. Now, Willie, can you break it? W. No ma'am.

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