The American First Class Book, Or, Exercises in Reading and Recitation: Selected Principally from Modern Authors of Great Britain and America, and Designed for the Use of the Highest Class in Public and Private Schools

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Carter, Hendee & Company, 1835 - 480 ページ
 

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Eternity of God Greenwood
39
The sameconcluded Ibid
41
Cadmus
68
On the pleasure of acquiring knowledge Alison
72
On the Uses of Knowledge Bid
73
52
83
Mercury an English Duellist and
88
The mutual relation between Sleep and Night Paley
109
Social Worship agreeable to the best impulses of our nature Mrs Barbauld
110
On the relative value of good Sense and Beauty in the Female Sex Land Lit Gazette
116
The Miseries of War Robert Hall
124
Nature and Poetry favorable to Virtue Humility
127
Consideration of the excuses that are offered to palliate a neglect of religion Bucxminster
129
Subject continued Ism
131
Subject concluded Ibid
134
Apostrophe to Mount Parnassus Byron
137
Maternal Affection Scrap Book
140
New mode of Fishing Scrap Book
142
The Seasons Monthly Anthology
144
its peculiarity accounted for Beattie
154
The American Republic Byron
164
An Evening Sketch
165
Autumn Alison
166
Slavery Camper
181
Report of an adjudged cose not to be found
185
On the reasonableness of Christian Faith Buckminster
187
On the importance of Christian Faith Ibid
190
The Coral Grove
195
Night from the Lay Preacher Dennie
196
Spring Dennie
202
The Grave Stones James Gray 178
208
Character of Mr James Watt Jeffrey
222
The Monied Man New Monthly Mag
228
The Highlander W Gillespie
230
Southey
232
Daily Prayer Morning Channing
234
Daily Prayer Evening Ibid
237
A Norton
239
Baneful influence of skeptical philosophy Campbell
240
On the Dangers of Moral Sentiment unaccompanied with Active Virtue Alison
246
On Infidelity A Thompson
249
The Young Minstrel Beattie
275
Ossians Address to the Sun Ossian 281
281
On the Use and Abuse of Amusements Alison
287
Forest Trees W Irving
295
Old Mortality Tales of My Landlord
298
Huntington
305
The Discontented Pendulum Jane Taylor
314
A belief in the Superintendence of Providence
317
The Greek Emigrants Song J G Percival
322
Letter from the British Spy in Virginia Wirt
324
Thanksgiving Crafts
329
NewEngland Id
330
its
333
Burial places near Constantinople Anastasius
337
Destruction of Goldau and other villages Btokminster
345
Affecting picture of Constancy in Love Crabbe 242
351
A Thunderstorm among the Highlands of Scotland Wilson
357
Religion and Superstition contrasted Mrs Carter
362
The Waterfall from the Russian Anthology Derzhavin
366
The Aldermans Funeral Southey 308
370
The Churchyarufirst and second voices Karamsin
377
The Rich man and the Poor man Ibid Khemniizer
378
The Abuses of Conscience a sermon Sterne
379
Dirge of Alaric the Visigoth E Everett
388
Character of John Playfair Jeffrey
391
The American Eagle Neal
398
Lochiels Warning Campbell
406
Prince Edward and his keeper Miss Baillie
412
The BHnd Preacher Wirt
415
Arthur Hubert and attendants Shakspeare
418
Battle Hymn of the Berlin Landsturm Korner
427
Extract from Heaven and Eartha Mystery Byron
428
Extract from the Essay on Criticism Pope
433
Gil Bias and the Archbishop from Le Sage
436
Lines on the entry of the Austrians into Naples Moore
440
Malcolm Macduff and Rosso Ibid
442
Thomson
460
Address of the Bard to the Inhabitants of
464
On the moral uses of the phenomena of the material universe Alison
478
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256 ページ - Take the wings Of morning, pierce the Barcan wilderness, Or lose thyself in the continuous woods Where rolls the Oregon, and hears no sound Save his own dashings, — yet the dead are there: And millions in those solitudes, since first The flight of years began, have laid them down In their last sleep, — the dead reign there alone.
255 ページ - When thoughts Of the last bitter hour come like a blight Over thy spirit, and sad images Of the stern agony, and shroud, and pall, And breathless darkness, and the narrow house, Make thee to shudder, and grow sick at heart — Go forth, under the open sky, and list To nature's teachings, while from all around — Earth and her waters, and the depths of air — Comes a still voice...
252 ページ - Whither, midst falling dew, While glow the heavens with the last steps of day, Far, through their rosy depths, dost thou pursue Thy solitary way? Vainly the fowler's eye Might mark thy distant flight to do thee wrong, As, darkly painted on the crimson sky, Thy figure floats along.
452 ページ - ... tis true, this god did shake ; His coward lips did from their colour fly; And that same eye whose bend doth awe the world Did lose his lustre : I did hear him groan : Ay, and that tongue of his that bade the Romans Mark him, and write his speeches in their books, Alas ! it cried, " Give me some drink, Titinius,
455 ページ - If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle: I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on; 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent; That day he overcame the Nervii : — Look ! In this place ran Cassius...
469 ページ - The stars shall fade away, the sun himself Grow dim with age, and Nature sink in years, But thou shalt flourish in immortal youth, Unhurt amidst the war of elements, The wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds.
353 ページ - Return, Alpheus, the dread voice is past That shrunk thy streams ; return, Sicilian Muse, And call the vales, and bid them hither cast Their bells and flowerets of a thousand hues.
456 ページ - I tell you that which you yourselves do know; Show you sweet Caesar's wounds, poor poor dumb mouths, And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus, And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue In every wound of Caesar that should move The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.
374 ページ - And he divided unto them his living. And not many days after the younger son gathered all together and took his journey into a far country, and there wasted his substance with riotous living and when he had spent all, there arose a mighty famine in that land; and he began to be in want. And he went and joined himself to a citizen of that country; and he sent him into his fields to feed swine. And he would . . . fain have filled his belly with the husks that the swine did eat; and no man gave unto...
352 ページ - For we were nursed upon the self-same hill, Fed the same flock, by fountain, shade, and rill; Together both, ere the high lawns appeared Under the opening eyelids of the morn, We drove a-field, and both together heard What time the gray-fly winds her sultry horn...

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