On the probable fall in the value of gold: the commercial and social consequences which may ensue, and the measures which it invites

前表紙
A. Ireland and co., 1859 - 196 ページ
 

レビュー - レビューを書く

レビューが見つかりませんでした。

ページのサンプル

他の版 - すべて表示

多く使われている語句

人気のある引用

192 ページ - ... purpose. On the other hand, by referring and limiting them to the nature or character of the commerce that shall have been engaged in, no necessary or important purpose would be subserved. It was entirely unnecessary to say that the commerce which had been engaged in must have been lawful commerce.
61 ページ - ... to barter his gold in that country for the other metal, on terms which will deviate little from that prescribed in the year XI.
vi ページ - ... There is no contract, public or private, no engagement, national or individual, which is unaffected by it. The enterprises of commerce, the profits of trade, the arrangements made in all the domestic relations of society, the wages of labour...
84 ページ - Clearing-house now dispenses completely with the use of bank notes ; all is settled by the transfer of sums from one account to another in the books of the Bank of England.
vi ページ - The enterprises of commerce, the profits of trade, the arrangements made in all the domestic relations of society, the wages of labour, pecuniary transactions of the highest amount and of the lowest, the payment of the national debt, the provision for the national expenditure, the command which the coin of the smallest denomination has over the necessaries of life, are all affected by the decision to which we may come on that great question which I am about to submit to the consideration of the committee.
114 ページ - I have already alluded, whose incomes consist of a sum of money (napoleons or sovereigns) fixed in advance. They will live in a perpetual state of trouble, anxiety, and uneasiness. They will sink by whole sections from their present state to another, in which they will enjoy only the half of their previous comforts ; reasoning, as I always do, upon the assumption that gold falls to the half of its present value. They will be flung headlong, without rule or measure, down to a lower station, and without...
114 ページ - This transition will be an interval painful to pass, and will be marked by innumerable shocks and sufferings. The value of all kinds of property will be subjected to a painful uncertainty and to injurious fluctuations. It will be still worse for those persons whose incomes consist of a sum of money (napoleons or sovereigns) fixed in advance. They will live in a perpetual state of trouble, anxiety, and uneasiness. They will sink by whole sections from- their present state to another, in which they...
65 ページ - To this view of the case M. Chevalier opposes the consideration of the vast extent of California and Australia, and the great richness of the alluvium which has been hitherto worked. " The conditions in which deposits are found in California and Australia are such, that it is not a very sanguine view to suppose that in each of these countries alluvial ground will be found equal to 60,000 hectares of deposits of a metre in thickness, and of the richness of i to 100,000
187 ページ - Like metallist regimes of the past, therefore, the regimes of this period were sensitized to developments in the market for precious metals. Given the strong structural predisposition toward gold, any developments in the supply and demand for metals that suggested a secular decline...
112 ページ - All commodities, excepting gold, and every kind of property excepting that of which the income is from the present fixed, as is the case with government funds, ought, from the moment that the monetary crisis is terminated to have attained in the gold currency double the price which they are at present worth, upon the supposition quite arbitrary, 1 admit, of the depreciation reaching fifty per cent.

書誌情報