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room only for a single house. This given the name of “ Lot, Lot's Wife, space, however, which is about a mile and Children.” They rise to an asand a ialf in length, affords space for tonishing height above the tops of the gardens, groves, and walks; the houses hills; and though they seem, at first are handsomely built in the same sight, detached and unconnected masstyle as in England; the inhabitants, ses, they are found, on examination, language, manners, are all English. to form a part of the vertical strata, This vale is overhung on each side by and have a most striking appearance, the same stupendous cliff; which en- surrounded by deep chasms and tre. circle the rest of the island ; and mendous precipices, and with clusters which, to the eye of the stranger, seem of argillaceous bills, the most pictuto threaten the town with perpetual resque and romantic, whose summits destruction. Sometimes even goats, are all regularly fashioned, and exhibit browzing among the cliffs, have lovs- every tint of colour, except that of ened fragments, which leaving others vegetable green. Over all this part unsupported, have caused whole lor- of the island which borders on Sandy rents of them to descend into the val- Bay, there is a wildness in the sur. ley. For this reason the rearing of rounding scenery, surpassing every goats upon the island is prohibited. thing which the writer of this has The ascent up these ridges is by a ever seen. One feels here, as if transzigzag path, blown by gunpowder. ported into a new planet, where every For some time, nothing presents itself object strikes by its novelty, and is to the cye of the traveller, but rocks altogether unlike any thing which he rising over rocks, tiil, on reaching an had ever before seen. All the sureminence called High Knoll, about rounding hills, cliffs, rocks, and pre2000 feet above the sea, a plain bursts cipices, are strangely fashioned, and upon his view, covered with verdure so fantastically mixed and blended, and cultivation, and rich in every that they resemble more the aerial species of natural beauty. It consists shapes which we see among the clouds, of a series of beautiful valleys, groves, than any thing composed of denser lawns, interspersed with small plan. materials. tations, and handsome little country The highest point of St Helena is houses, the picturesque effect of which 2800 feet above the level of the sea. is heightened by the lofty hills and Here, and on all the loftier hills, the precipices by which they are inclosed. air is as cool as in England during Here doubtless will be the residence the months of April or May. The of Napoleon ; and it might afford hap- more elevated parts, which catch the piness to a mind otherwise constituted; passing moisture, are clothed with but cannot be supposed congenial to verdure, while, as we descend, steri. one so full of restless activity and lity more and more prevails. The boundless ambition. On passing a. air is remarkably salubrious. Vegenocher ridge we arrive at Sandy Bay, tables of every description abound; which successive visitors describe as but no grain is sown in any part o surpassing in romantic beauty all that the island. they had ever seen in any other por Our main concern, however, with tion of the globe. The following regard to St Helena, now, is the se. description is given in an analytical curity which it affords against the description of St Helena, published escape of the ci-devant Emperor of about ten years ago.

France. This subject seems to have . There is a singular group of de. been very attentively considered by tached masses on the south side of the Mr Johnson, who, having minutely island, to which the inhabitants have surveyed the island, was better qua.

lified to judge than any one else. We sary article of food on this Island, shall therefore give, in his own words, and consequently the fishing - boats the discussion into which he has en round the coast must be well watched. tered upon this question.

Some deserters, a few years ago, put The possibility of escape may be off, one night, from the Island, in a branched into - ist, Internal bribery boat left by a vessel on purpose for or connivance.--2d, External force. them, and steered for Ascension (400 -3d, External stratagem,--and 4th, miles distant) where they were to be The first and third combined. picked up. Being bad navigators

Against domestic treachery, no part they missed the Island and the ship, of the globe offers infallible security. and had no other resource than that British honour and British sense of ot crossing the Atlantic Ocean to the duty must form the surest palladium ; coast of Brazil, in an open boat, and there must necessarily be less ex without water or provisions! This posed to trial and temptation, on an they effected, though some of them insulated rock like St Helena, than died with hunger and thirst on the in almost any other spot which could way. Such an occurrence shews what he selected.

may be accomplished. Indeed the There is one important considera run froin St Helena to Ascension tion under this head, which should might be taken with little or no baz. not be overlooked. The inhabitants ard, in the smallest boat, since the of St Helena owe all their luxuries, water is smooth and the wind fair. and

many of the necessaries of life, to Ascension also affords food and places their frequent intercourse with Euro- of concealment for a few individuals, pean shipping, and particularly with for some time, while waiting there to the East India fleets returning from be picked up by their friends. If our Asiatic possessions. This inter ever a plan be laid for Napoleon's course must now be broken off at escape, Ascension, or the track to it, once, or else the chances of communi. will, in all probability, be the apcation and escape will multiply to a pointed rendezvous for both parties. dangerous amount; and Napoleon The clearness of the horizon by night will be to St Helena, what protound and by day will always prevent any peace is to a Naval and Non-commer- vessel from approaching, for the purcial Seaport-RUIN!

pose of taking a deserter from the That the Inhabitants of St Helena Island itself. He must escape by will ever most devoutly pray for a corruption or stratagem from the speedy deliverance from the presence Island in a boat, and take the chance of their august prisoner, is as certain of being picked up afterwards. Adas it is natural; and how far this feel- mitting domestic treachery, a fishinging may, on some future occasion, boat might cross the Atlantic to the operate in favour of Napoleon's de Brazil coast, without any imminent signs, is a question that should not risk, as was instanced above in a compass unagitated or unregarded by mon whale boat. But Ascension is Government. It is difficult, indeed, the most probable way, and should be to determine which is the less hazar- watched by a small vessel. dous expedient-that of shutting up the port, and increasing the discon

External Force. fent of the inhabitants, or of permitting the intercourse with passing ships, This pre-supposes another revoluand multiplying the opportunities for tion in favour of the exile, and an arescape.

mament sent against the place of his Fish constitutes a great and neces- confinement. St. Helena, however,

cannot,

cannot, for reasons before explained, southward of Munden's battery, near be taken by surprise, and it is difficult the watering place. But the surf to conceive how a regular open at there is so great, and the place so well tack could be made upon the Island, defended by batteries now, that no atbecause the accessible points are tempt will ever be made again in that guarded by batteries, which are com- point. pletely out of the reach (from their elevation) of annoyance from ships,

External Stratagem. and a landing cannot possibly be ef. fecied till these batteries are silenced. It does not appear possible that Besides, owing to the winds and tides, any stratagem from without could a hostile force must anchor close under have a chance of success, without a Ladder Hill, or else be drifted away; previous plan being fixed with the and the guns from this battery alone, prisoner within the Island. The small would sink every thing that attempt- number that might possibly land from ed to bring to an anchor on the bank a boat in the night, and scramble up which runs but a few hundred yards some precipice, would never be able from the rocks. Granting, however, to penetrate through the guards over that a landing could be effected at the Napoleon's person, nor effect his de. watering place, Ladder and Rupert's livery before daylight. Neither, Hill would play on them from both without a previous knowledge of the sides, while the sea-line would carry local topography of the Island, could inevitable destruction through their they possibly find their way through ranks in front! In short, an attack its intricate and dangerous paths.on the northern side of the Island The great danger, therefore, of conwould be absolute insanity.

tinuing the intercourse with European The approach to Sandy Bay is so shipping, is the chances such interguarded by rocks, reefs, shoals, and course may afford of secret communibreakers, that boats only could at- cations between the exile and his ad. tempt it; and it is very improbable herents; since no external stratagem that one in five would ever reach the can succeed without antecedent arshore. Here too, after having esca- rangement within. ped the water, they would be exposed It is scarcely necessary to remark, to a dreadful fire from the cliffs and that American vessels should never be eminences around, while the ships permitted to anchor at St Helena, from which they disembarked would or hover round the coast, for reasons be forced to abandon them to their which it would be useless to explain. fate, as they could not keep to wind. Neither would it be politic ever to ward of the Island to receive them in permit, during Napoleon's life, any of their retreat.

his suite to leave the Island, and Upon the whole, St. Helena may thereby convey, orally, any plans or be considered more impregnable than information, either Gibraltar or Malta, since the High Knoll, on which is built a points of access are extremely limited, small but very strong citadel, from and defended as well by nature as by whence signals could be made to all art; while all other parts of the coast parts of the Island, by day or by are composed of overhanging preci. night, appears a situation remarkably pices, for ever buffeted by a roaring eligible for Napoleon's abode, as it surf.

precludes the possibility of escape or It is recorded, indeed, that a land- surprise, without the most culpable ing was once effected, in the night, at neglect or rather treachery of his a small inflection of the coast to the guards.

· Account

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An Account of the Nit Revenue collected in England and Scotlond, severally, during each of the Fourteen Years, ending the 5th January 1815.

PERMANENT DUTIES: -CUSTOMS,NET PRODUCE.

£. England. £. Scotland. €. Gt. Britain, 1801 7,114,205 2 23 437,224 934 7,551,429 11 6 1802 6,760,944 12 5 491,30; 10 1 7,252,250 2 6 1803 6,179,542 13 25 442,920 15 0 6,622,463 8 27 1804 6,117,191 26 367,358 3 13 6,48 1,549 5 8 1805 6,574,785 10 3 416,587 3 4 6,991,372 137 1806 7,019,561 11 41 538,953 6 43 7,058,514 17 9 1807 6.620,103 13 0 412,090 19 15 7,062,199 12 1808 6,901,103 18 7 486,373 5 7,387,477 4 09 1809 7,500,091 17 14 576,045 19 2 8,076,137 16 31 1810

7,818,755 11 2 609,499 127 8,428,255 3 9 1811 6,912,938 361 474,412 13 2 7,387,350 16 8 1812 7,350,626 5 85 615,575 17 10 7,866,202 3 65 1 813 6,986,661 13 81 436,678 12 Sep 7,473,340 6 05 1814 7,836,287 11 11 414,510 15 5 8,250,798 7 5

EXCISE.NET PRODUCE, £. England. £. Scotland. £. Gt. Britain. 1801 10,565,745 4 1 863,646 18 11,429,392 23 1802 13,822,968 0 4 1,034,595 2 64 14,857,563 2 111 1803 15,643,442 9 24 1,131,259 36% 16,774,701 12 9 1804

13,893,412 19 2 841,593 89 14,835,006 711 1805 15,114,435 90 1,039,720 9 9 16,154,071 18 9 1806

15,979,959 26 1,187,863 5 13 17,167,822 7 7* 1807 16,334,144 11 10: 1,315,163 7 11 17,649,307 19 04 1808 16,665,603 8 3% 1,317,724 1 4 17,983,327 973 1809 15,913,177 7 17 1,085,370 16 9: 16,998,548 3 10% 1910 16,993,285 18 9 1,235,247 17 71 18,228,533 16 4 1811 17,364,763 11 42 1,357,067 11 116 18,721,831 3 35 1812 16,136,763 6 0 1,291,910 11 0 17,428,673 17 0,3 1813 17,061,688 0 55 1,152,322 9 0 18,213,410 9 54 1814 17,706,684 7 S 1,424,721 14 111 19,131,406 2 37

STAMPS.NET PRODUCE, £. Engånil. £. Scotland. £. Gt. Britain. 1801 2,732,362 4

154,724 14 8. 2,887,086 19 0 1802

2,853,065 16 8 167,376 5 8 3,020,442 2 54 1803

3,028,335 18 7 179,584 12 10 3,207,920 11 5 1804 3,213,258 16 10% 185,694 6 6

3,400,953 34 1805 3,685,920 3 2 240,085 7 5 3,926,005 10 7 1806

3,880,140 3 6 252,280 3 8 4,132,420 7 24 1807 4,006,583 4 8 264,8 18 9 3 4,271,431 13 11 1808

4,241,719 1 11 271,508 19 7 4,517,228 1 6 1809 4,831,277 1

81

319,036 10 2 5,150,8!3 10 101 1810 5,027,271

5 4

333,707 1241 5,360.978 17 9 1811 4,759,813 4 65 324,090 15 9 5,083,904 0 4 1812 4,780,890 13 45 333,639 8 8 5,114,530 2 05 1813 4,978,602 12 0 358,838 12 6 5,317,441 6 1814 5,252,142 10 0. 366,247 7 2 5,618,389 17 3 Sept. 1815.

LAND

.

1801 1802 1803 1804 1805 1806 1807 1808 1809 1810 1811 1812 1813 1814

LAND-TAX.NET PRODUCE. £. England. £. Scotland. 1,465,008 93 34,876 5 9 1,507,985 3 91 32,312 18 0 1,417,868 5 91 50,137 11 11 1,395,664 15 74 25,625 16 1 1,447,357 5 94 49,924 13 2 2등 1,361,493 2 8 50,439 17 31 1,345,089 17 11 48,801 18 93 1,512,597 5 03 31,482 16 81 1,446,183 10 3 26,662 10 0 1,351,253 12 7 25,430 10 71 1,271,129 4 51 25,178 8 8 1,307,204 12 64 24,551 10 41 1,235,488 12 6

31,145 1 11 1,223,608 18 7 24,963 2 7

£. Gt. Britain.

1,499,884 15 0 1,540,298 19; 1,468,005 17 8 1,421,290 12 6 1,497,281 19 05 1,411,933 00 1,893,891 16 8! 1,5+4,080 18 1,472,846 0 3 1,376,684 S 3 1,296,307 12 8 1,331,756 2 10 1,266,631 13 73 1,248,572 1 2

1801 1802 1803 1804 1805 1806 1807 1808 1809 1810 1811 1812 1813 1914

ASSESSED-TAXES.NET PRODUCE. £. England. £. Scotland. £. Gt, Britain. 2,676,620 6 5 87,713 2 10 2,764,333 93 3,206,137 10 6 153,898 2 11 3,360,035 13 5 3,924,720 7 13 156,076 14

21

4,080,797 1 41 4,089,908 6 8 125,164 15 5 4,215,073 2 1 4,209,712 997 133,723 18 5 4,343,436 8 $ 4,404,097 10 6 211,482 2 105 4,615,579 13 4 4,855,832 4 92 375,241 9 3 5,231,073 14 04 5,348,626 13 75 423,804 8 7 5,772,431 2 94 6,230,797 16 25 457,697 14

81

6,688,495 10 114 5,570,934 16 81 351,973 7 5 5,922,908 4 14 5,501,725 911 309,607 12 3 5,811,333 1 4 5,411,436 5 27 397,543 6 21

5,808,979 11 5 5,871,127 10 41 448,572 16 02 6,319,700 6 5 5,996,729 11 7 415,675 8 43 6,412,405 004

POST-OFFICE.NET PRODUCE.

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£. Scotland. £. Gt. Britain.

1801 1802 1803 1804 1805 1806 1807 1808 1809 3810 1811 1812 1813 1814

£. England.

759,410 3 8 851,613 6 2 827,563 13 8 845,408 10 1 960,445 15 2 1,014,470 3 5

981,752 19 1

973,370 7 5 1,067,995 14 1,157,607 11 11 1,138,419 8 6 1,201,225 19 11 1,266,122 2 9 1,358,257 17 71

88,179 12 51 847,589 16 15 95,397 5 1

947,010 11 S 96,740 16 11 924,304 99 97,437 12 8 942,846 29 107,989 18 10 1,068,435 14 0 1 14,815 3 111 1,129,285 7 118,853 1 9 1,100,606 0 10 115,137 911 1,088,507 17 41 121,267 13

0 1,189,263 7 71 131,179 3 34

1,288,786 15 9 133,401 3 0 1,271,820 11 6 141,617 3 3

1,942,843 3! 154,094 5 11

1,420,216 88 148,822 15 111 11,507,080 13 T

HIGHLAND

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