Geographies of Identity in Nineteenth-Century Japan

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University of California Press, 2005/02/07 - 271 ページ
In this pioneering study, David L. Howell looks beneath the surface structures of the Japanese state to reveal the mechanism by which markers of polity, status, and civilization came together over the divide of the Meiji Restoration of 1868. Howell illustrates how a short roster of malleable, explicitly superficial customs—hairstyle, clothing, and personal names— served to distinguish the "civilized" realm of the Japanese from the "barbarian" realm of the Ainu in the Tokugawa era. Within the core polity, moreover, these same customs distinguished members of different social status groups from one another, such as samurai warriors from commoners, and commoners from outcasts.
 

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目次

1 Introduction
1
2 The Geography of Status
20
3 Status and the Politics of the Quotidian
45
4 Violence and the Abolition of Outcaste Status
79
5 Ainu Identity and the Early Modern State
110
6 The Geography of Civilization
131
7 Civilization and Enlightenment
154
8 Ainu Identity and the Meiji State
172
Modernity and Ethnicity
197
Notes
205
Works Cited
237
Index
255
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著者について (2005)

David L. Howell is Professor of East Asian Studies and History at Princeton University. He is the author of Capitalism from Within: Economy, Society, and the State in a Japanese Fishery (California, 1995).

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