The Principles of Economical Philosophy, 第 1 巻

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Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, 1872
 

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Generally admitted that Physical Science is the true basis of all Science
15
Comtes Doctrine
16
Order of the Sciences
17
Comte fails to make Economics an Inductive Science
18
Selfcontradiction of Mr J S Mill as to the Method of Investigation proper to Economics
19
ne says the Inductive is the true method to investigate Economics
20
Unanimous opinion that Economics is an Inductive Science
21
Mr Mills assertion erroneous
24
Mr Mills arguments untenable
26
Argument from Feigned Cases
27
Experimental and Experiential Philosophy
28
CHAPTER II
29
Chemistry
30
Which Moral Science approaches most nearly to Physical Science
31
Science consists of two partsGeneral Conceptions and Gene ral Axioms
33
Alleged distinction between minds in science
34
On the Formation of General Conceptions
35
On the Formation of General Axioms
39
On the Law op Continuity
42
Plan of the work
44
CHAPTER III
46
His definitions
47
G Definition of Wealth in Roman Law
48
Rise of Economical Ideas in Modern Times
49
The Mercantile System
50
The doctrine of the Balance of Tbade
52
Example to show its fallacy
53
Error of the system
54
Refutation of the System in Adam Smith
55
Section II
57
Francois Quesnay
59
Fundamental Conceptions of the Physiocrates
65
Physiocrate doctrine of Money
67
Fundamental Defects of the Physiocrate doctrine
68
Le Trosnes arguments against admitting Immaterial and In corporeal Quantities to be Wealth
70
Physiocrate doctrine of Taxation
71
The Commercial Treaty of 1786
72
Merits of the Physiocrates
73
Superiority of Economical Philosophy
74
Section III
75
The Wealth of Nations
76
Real advance of Smith
79
J B Say
82
Mr John Stuart Mill
84
Mr Mills definition of Wealth
85
Defects of Mr Mills work
86
Triumph achieved by this School
88
The Third School of Economists
91
Section IX
302
Origin of Value
332
Defects of the Second School of Economists 88
335
Section III
342
modifying the General Law
348
Law or Continuity
355
CHAPTER VI
362
No money In the time of the Homeric poems
364
First kind of Currency in Greece
365
Coinage of the Lydians
367
Relation between Coin and Bullion
368
On the meaning of the Mint Pbice and Market Price of Gold and Silver
370
Consequences of a Depreciated Coinage 872
375
Method of testing the Depreciation of Coin
376
Alteration of Standard 878
379
Table shewing the successive Depreciation of the Gold and Silver Coin of England and Scotland
382
Of a Double Standard
384
Bad state of the Coin in 1695
389
Lowndess proposals
393
Newton on the Coinage
403
Recoinage of 1816
407
On a Seionoraoe
408
Smith and McCulloch in favour of a Scignorage
409
Of a Decimal Coinage
412
Three distinct Systems of Coinage
413
The French an example of the second System
414
2732 Reasons why erroneous
415
3387 Decimal integers and decimal fractions not analogous
416
3842 Superiority of present system
417
Principles regarding a Decimal Coinage
418
4445 Superiority of Decimal Accounts
419
Decimal Coinage in the Netherlands
428
Decimal Coinage in Russia
429
CHAPTER VII
435
On some erroneous Ideas as to the Nature of Credit
448
Meaning of the symbols + 0 and in Natural Philosophy
454
Use of Credit in commerce
471
Section II
481
fer of Debts
490
At Common Law the assignee may sue in the name of
497
The distinction between Bills as Orders and Notes as Pro
505
Section III
513
System of Credit consists of two branches Commercial
519
On Credit created for the purpose of being applied to
533
Section V
543
Meaning of Bank in English
549
Assertions of Mr Mill 25
557

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247 ページ - Consumption is the sole end and purpose of all production ; and the interest of the producer ought to be attended to, only so far as it may be necessary for promoting that of the consumer.
40 ページ - But know, that in the soul Are many lesser faculties, that serve Reason as chief ; among these, fancy next Her office holds ; of all external things, Which the five watchful senses represent, She forms imaginations, airy shapes, Which reason, joining or disjoining, frames All what we affirm or what deny, and call Our knowledge or opinion ; then retires Into her private cell when nature rests.
245 ページ - The annual labour of every nation is the fund which originally supplies it with all the necessaries and conveniences of life which it annually consumes, and which consist always either in the immediate produce of that labour, or in what is purchased with that produce from other nations.
156 ページ - The property which every man has in his own labour, as it is the original foundation of all other property, so it is the most sacred and inviolable.
259 ページ - THERE IS ONE SORT of labour which adds to the value of the subject upon which it is bestowed: there is another which has no such effect.
659 ページ - Rent is that portion of the produce of the earth, which is paid to the landlord for the use of the original and indestructible powers of the soil.
33 ページ - ... which make those men that take their instruction from the authority of books and not from their own meditation to be as much below the condition of ignorant men as men endued with true science are above it.
304 ページ - ... is to be counted into the bread we eat; the labour of those who broke the oxen, who digged and wrought the iron and stones, who felled and framed the timber employed about the plough, mill, oven, or any other utensils, which are a vast number, requisite to this corn, from its...
560 ページ - ... any body politic or corporate whatsoever created or to be created, or for any other persons whatsoever united or to be united in covenants or partnership exceeding the number of six persons in that part of Great Britain called England, to borrow, owe, or take up any sum or sums of money on their bills or notes payable on demand or at any less time than six months from the borrowing thereof...
293 ページ - But as a measure of quantity, such as the natural foot, fathom, or handful, which is continually varying in its own quantity, can never be an accurate measure of the quantity of other things, so a commodity, ichich is itself continually varying in its own value, can never be an accurate measure of the value of other commodities. Equal quantities of labour at all times and places may be said to be of equal value to the labourer.

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