Burr

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Modern Library, 1998 - 697 ページ
A hero of the American Revolution, Aaron Burr (1756-1836) served as vice president under Thomas Jefferson, took the life of Alexander Hamilton in a duel in 1804, and was later tried for treason when Jefferson accused him of plotting to make an empire of his own in the western territories. Told partly by Aaron Burr at the end of his long life and partly by a young journalist in whom Burr confides, this brilliantly imagined memoir, based on fact, is an enormously engaging work of fiction that treats the political intrigues of the new United States as if they were today's headlines.

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ユーザー レビュー  - jonfaith - www.librarything.com

"Although Americans justify their self-interest in moral terms, their true interest is never itself moral. Yet, paradoxically, only Americans - a few, that is- ever try to be moral in politics ... レビュー全文を読む

LibraryThing Review

ユーザー レビュー  - maryreinert - www.librarything.com

I read this after "1876" and had a bit more trouble following it although there were definitely signs of Vidal's great writing. Troubled times for the early founding fathers with very little agreement ... レビュー全文を読む

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著者について (1998)

Gore Vidal was born Eugene Luther Gore Vidal Jr. on October 3, 1925 at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York. He did not go to college but attended St. Albans School in Washington and graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire in 1943. He enlisted in the Army, where he became first mate on a freight supply ship in the Aleutian Islands. His first novel, Williwaw, was published in 1946 when he was twenty-one years old and working as an associate editor at the publishing company E. P. Dutton. The City and the Pillar was about a handsome, athletic young Virginia man who gradually discovers that he is homosexual, which caused controversy in the publishing world. The New York Times refused to advertise the novel and gave a negative review of it and future novels. He had such trouble getting subsequent novels reviewed that he turned to writing mysteries under the pseudonym Edgar Box and then gave up novel-writing altogether for a time. Once he moved to Hollywood, he wrote television dramas, screenplays, and plays. His films included I Accuse, Suddenly Last Summer with Tennessee Williams, Is Paris Burning? with Francis Ford Coppola, and Ben-Hur. His most successful play was The Best Man, which he also adapted into a film. He started writing novels again in the 1960's including Julian, Washington, D.C., Myra Breckenridge, Burr, Myron, 1876, Lincoln, Hollywood, Live From Golgotha: The Gospel According to Gore Vidal, and The Golden Age. He also published two collections of essays entitled The Second American Revolution, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism in 1982 and United States: Essays 1952-1992. In 2009, he received the National Book Awards lifetime achievement award. He died from complications of pneumonia on July 31, 2012 at the age of 86.

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