Negotiating Claims: The Emergence of Indigenous Land Claim Negotiation Policies in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States

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Taylor & Francis, 2006 - 259 ページ
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Why do governments choose to negotiate indigenous land claims rather than resolve claims through some other means? In this book Scholtz explores why a government would choose to implement a negotiation policy, where it commits itself to a long-run strategy of negotiation over a number of claims and over a significant course of time.

Through an examination strongly grounded in archival research of post-World War Two government decision-making in four established democracies - Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States - Scholtz argues that negotiation policies emerge when indigenous people mobilize politically prior to significant judicial determinations on land rights, and not after judicial change alone. Negotiating Claims links collective action and judicial change to explain the emergence of new policy institutions.

 

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目次

Of Recognition and Delegation
13
Chapter Three Indigenous Land Rights and Cabinet DecisionMaking in Canada 19451973
35
Chapter Four Cabinet DecisionMaking and Maori Land Rights in New Zealand 19441989
73
Chapter Five Cabinet DecisionMaking and Indigenous Land Rights in Australia 19451998
109
The American Land Claims Experience in Comparative Perspective
155
Chapter Seven Beyond Negotiation
195
Notes
205
Bibliography
237
Index
249
Back cover
261
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著者について (2006)

Christa Scholtz is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at McGill University.

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