Writing and Literacy in Chinese, Korean and Japanese

前表紙
John Benjamins Publishing, 1995/12/07 - 412 ページ
Chinese, Japanese, South (and North) Koreans in East Asia have a long, intertwined and distinguished cultural history and have achieved, or are in the process of achieving, spectacular economic success. Together, these three peoples make up one quarter of the world population.
They use a variety of unique and fascinating writing systems: logographic Chinese characters of ancient origin, as well as phonetic systems of syllabaries and alphabets. The book describes, often in comparison with English, how the Chinese, Korean and Japanese writing systems originated and developed; how each relates to its spoken language; how it is learned or taught; how it can be computerized; and how it relates to the past and present literacy, education, and culture of its users.
Intimately familiar with the three East Asian cultures, Insup Taylor with the assistance of Martin Taylor, has written an accessible and highly readable book. Writing and Literacy in Chinese, Korean and Japanese is intended for academic readers (students in East Asian Studies, linguistics, education, psychology) as well as for the general public (parents, business, government). Readers of the book will learn about the interrelated cultural histories of China, Korea and Japan, but mainly about the various writing systems, some exotic, some familar, some simple, some complex, but all fascinating.
 

目次

1 Introduction
1
Chinese
25
2 Spoken Chinese
28
Hanzi
43
4 Meaning Representation in Characters
62
5 Sound Representation by Characters
79
6 Logographic Characters vs Phonetic Scripts
87
7 Text Writing in Chinese Korean and Japanese
102
16 History of Education and Literacy in Korea
255
Summary and Conclusions
272
Part III Japanese
279
17 Japanese Language
282
Chinese Characters
295
Japanese Syllabary
306
Roman Letters
315
21 Why Keep Kanji?
323

8 Reforming Spoken and Written Chinese
112
9 Learning Hanzi Pinyin and Putonghua
131
10 History of Education and Literacy in China
144
Summary and Conclusions
174
Korean
185
11 Korean Language
188
Chínese Characters
203
Alphabetic Syllabary
211
14 Learning Hangul and Hancha
231
15 Why Should Hancha be Kept?
243
22 Learning Kanji and Kana
342
23 The Japanese Educational System
354
24 History of Mass Literacy in Japan
364
Summary and Conclusions
374
Postface
380
Glossary
381
Subject Index
393
Author Index
410
The series Studies in Written Language and Literacy
413
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