The Balance of Emotion and Intellect: An Essay Introductory to the Study of Philosophy

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C. Kegan Paul, 1878 - 213 ページ
 

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182 ページ - O'ER wayward childhood would'st thou hold firm rule, And sun thee in the light of happy faces ; Love, Hope, and Patience, these must be thy graces, And in thine own heart let them first keep school. For as old Atlas on his broad neck places Heaven's starry globe, and there sustains it, — so Do these upbear the little world below Of Education, — Patience, Love, and Hope. Methinks, I see them...
143 ページ - Propositions of this kind are discoverable by the mere operation of thought, without dependence on what is anywhere existent in the universe. Though there never were a circle or triangle in nature, the truths demonstrated by Euclid would for ever retain their certainty and evidence.
143 ページ - Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained in the same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to reality.
183 ページ - ... Hope is yet alive ; And, bending o'er with soul-transfusing eyes, And the soft murmurs of the mother dove, Woos back the fleeting spirit, and half supplies : — Thus Love repays to Hope what Hope first gave to Love. Yet haply there will come a weary day, When overtasked at length Both Love and Hope beneath the load give way. Then, with a statue's smile, a statue's strength, Stands the mute sister, Patience, nothing loth, And both supporting does the work of both.
190 ページ - The colours of hope to the valley cling, And weak old Winter himself must shiver, Withdrawn to the mountains, a crownless king : Whence, ever retreating, he sends again Impotent showers of sleet that darkle In belts across the green o
199 ページ - are uttered by every woman if a mouse does but run across the floor. The ignorant and the thoughtless however will continue to class the English character under the phlegmatic temperament, whilst the philosopher will perceive that it is the exact polar antithesis to a phlegmatic character.
199 ページ - French, in whom the lower forms of passion are constantly bubbling up from the shallow and superficial character of their feelings, have appropriated all the phrases of passion to the service of trivial and ordinary life; and hence they have no language of passion for the service of poetry or of occasions really demanding it; for it has been already enfeebled by continual association with cases of an unimpassioned order. But a character of deeper passion has a perpetual standard in itself, by which...
182 ページ - And in thine own heart let them first keep school. For as old Atlas on his broad neck places ' Heaven's starry globe, and there sustains it, so Do these upbear the little world below Of education, — Patience, Love, and Hope. Methinks I see them grouped in seemly show. The straitened arms upraised, the palms aslope, And robes that, touching as adown they flow, Distinctly blend, like snow embossed in snow.
vi ページ - Be a philosopher ; but, amidst all your philosophy, be still a man.
136 ページ - ... as well as any that should interrogate him, yet he could not possibly know at first sight which of them was called green, or red, or by any other name.

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