The Autobiography of Yukichi Fukuzawa

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Columbia University Press, 2007 - 477 ページ

Yukichi Fukuzawa (1835-1901) was a leading figure in the cultural revolution that transformed Japan from an isolated feudal nation into a full-fledged player in the modern world. He translated a wide range of Western works and adapted them to Japanese needs, inventing a colorful prose style close to the vernacular. He also authored many books, which were critical in introducing the powerful but alien culture of the West to the Japanese. Only by adopting the strengths and virtues of the West, he argued, could Japan maintain its independence despite the "disease" of foreign relations.

Dictated by Fukuzawa in 1897, this autobiography offers a vivid portrait of the intellectual's life story and a rare look inside the formation of a new Japan. Starting with his childhood in a small castle town as a member of the lower samurai class, Fukuzawa recounts in great detail his adventures as a student learning Dutch, as a traveler bound for America, and as a participant in the tumultuous politics of the pre-Restoration era. Particularly notable is Fukuzawa's ability to view the new Japan from both the perspective of the West and that of the old Japan in which he had been raised. While a strong advocate for the new civilization, he was always aware of its roots in the old.

 

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目次

CHILDHOOD
1
NAGASAKI
21
STUDENT WAYS AT OGATA SCHOOL
58
FURTHER STEPS TOWARD A LIBERAL AGE
239
MY PERSONAL AND HOUSEHOLD ECONOMY
261
MY PRIVATE LIFE MY FAMILY
290
A FINAL WORD ON THE GOOD LIFE
307
OF MEIJI NATIONALISM by Albert Craig
373
THE FIRST ESSAY 1872
448
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著者について (2007)

Albert M. Craig is Harvard-Yenching Professor of History Emeritus at HarvardUniversity. He is the author of many books, including Choshu in the MeijiRestoration, The Heritage of Japanese Civilization, and East Asia: Tradition and Transformation.

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