The Chronicles of Enguerrand de Monstrelet: Containing an Account of the Cruel Civil Wars Between the Houses of Orleans and Burgundy; of the Possession of Paris and Normandy by the English; Their Expulsion Thence; and of Other Memorable Events that Happened in the Kingdom of France, as Well as in Other Countries ... Beginning at the Year MCCCC. where that of Sir John Froissart Finishes, and Ending at the Year MCCCCLXVII. and Continued by Others to the Year MDXVI.

前表紙
Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1810

この書籍内から

レビュー - レビューを書く

LibraryThing Review

ユーザー レビュー  - antiquary - LibraryThing

I bought this in two separate volumes. The first volume I bought more recently from Forgotten Books reprints. The second volume I bought much earlier from Kissinger reprints. These chronicles continue ... レビュー全文を読む

LibraryThing Review

ユーザー レビュー  - DinadansFriend - LibraryThing

Volume one of the 1840 translation of the Chronicles of Enguerrand de Monstrelet. The translator was the same Thomas Johnes who did Froissart at about the same time. EM took up where Froissart stopped ... レビュー全文を読む

ページのサンプル

他の版 - すべて表示

多く使われている語句

人気のある引用

174 ページ - ... constable, and others of the princes, to confess their sins with sincere contrition and to fight boldly against the enemy. The English loudly sounded their trumpets as they approached, and the French stooped to prevent the arrows hitting them on the vizors of their helmets ; thus the distance was now but small between, the two armies, although the French had retired some paces. Before, however, the general attack commenced, numbers of the French were slain and severely wounded by the English...
174 ページ - Saveuses, who had been also ordered on this service, quitted his troop, thinking they would follow him, to attack the English, but he was shot dead from off his horse. The others had their horses so severely handled by the archers, that, smarting from pain, they galloped on the van division and threw it into the utmost confusion, breaking the line in many places. The horses were become unmanageable, so that horses and riders were tumbling on the ground, and the whole army was thrown into disorder,...
175 ページ - ... disorder in the van division, and, throwing down their bows, fought lustily with swords, hatchets, mallets, and bill-hooks, slaying all before them. Thus they came to the second battalion that had been posted in the rear of the first ; and the archers followed close king Henry and his men-at-arms. Duke Anthony of Brabant, who had just arrived in obedience to the summons of the king of France, threw himself with a small company (for, to make greater haste, he had pushed forward, leaving the main...
173 ページ - Their archers, amounting to at least thirteen thousand, let off a shower of arrows with all their might, and as high as possible, so as not to lose their effect : they were, for the most part, without any armour, and in jackets, with their hose loose, and hatchets or swords hanging to their girdles ; some indeed were bare-footed and without hats.
178 ページ - English ; but it availed nothing, for they were all killed or made prisoners. There were other small bodies of French on different parts of the plain; but they were soon routed, slain, or taken.
8 ページ - Charles, by the grace of God, king of France, to...
175 ページ - ... and threw it into the utmost confusion, breaking the line in many places. The horses were become unmanageable, so that horses and riders were tumbling on the ground, and the whole army was thrown into disorder, and forced back on some lands that had been just sown with corn. Others, from fear of death, fled ; and this caused so universal a panic in the army that great part followed the example. The English took instant advantage of the disorder in the van division, and, throwing down their bows,...
176 ページ - During the heat of the combat, when the English had gained the upper hand and made several prisoners, news was brought to king Henry that the French were attacking his rear, and had already captured the greater part of his baggage and sumpter-horses. This was indeed true, for Robinet de...
177 ページ - Charoléis of a most precious sword, ornamented with diamonds, that had belonged to the king of England. They had taken this sword, with other rich jewels, from king Henry's baggage*, — and had made this present, that, in case they should at any time be called to an account for what they had done...
189 ページ - Alen9on and yield myself to you;' but, as the king was holding out his hand to receive his pledge, he was put to death by the guards. At this period, the lord de Longny marshal of France, as I have said, was hastening, with six hundred...

書誌情報