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NOTES.

appeared to the English to be the main body of 1. BATTLE OF ANCRAM MOOR.-P. 403. the Scots, in the act of flight. Under this persuaLord Evers, and sir Brian Latoun, during the sion, Evers and Latoun hurried precipitately foryear 1544, committed the most dreadful ravages ward, and, having ascended the hill, whioh their upon the Scottish frontiers, compelling most of the foes had abandoned, were no less dismayed than inhabitants, and especially the men of Liddesdale, astonished, to find the phalanx of Scottish spearto take assurance under the king of England. Upon men drawn up, in firm array, upon the flat ground the 17th of November, in that year, the sum total below. The Scots in their turn became the asof their depredations stood thus, in the bloody sailants. A heron, roused from the marshes by the leger of lord Evers.

tumult, soared away betwixt the encountering arTowns, towers, barnekynes, pa

mies: “O!” exclaimed Angus, “ that I had here ryshe churches, bastill houses,

my white goss hawk, that we might all yoke at burned and destroyed......... 192

once!”—Godscroft. The English, breathless and Scots slain.....................

.. 403 fatigued, having the setting sun and wind full in Prisoners taken................

816 their faces, were unable to withstand the resolute Nolt (cattle). .................. 10,386

and desperate charge of the Scottish lances. No Shepe......................... 12,492 sooner had they begun to waver, than their own Nags and geldings...

........ 1,296

allies, the assured borderers, who had been waitGayt...........

.. 200 ing the event, threw aside their red crosses, and, Bolls of corn................... 850 joining their countrymen, made a most merciless Insight gear, &c. (furniture) an incalcula slaughter among the English fugitives, the purble quantity.

suers calling upon each other to“ remember Murdin's State Papers, vol. i, p. 51. Broomhouse!”- Lesley, p. 478. In the battle fell The king of England had promised to these two

| lord Evers, and his son, together with sir Brian barons a feu rant of the ce

w which they | Latoun, and 800 Englishmen, many of whom were bad thus reduced to a desert; upon hearing which, pe

n I persons of rank. A thousand prisoners were taken. Archibald Douglas, the seventh earl of Angus, is

1: Among these was a patriotic alderman of London, said to have sworn to write the deed of investiture

Read by name, who, having contumaciously reupon their skins, with sbarp pens and bloody ink,"

inki | fused to pay his portion of a benevolence, demandin resentment for their having defaced the tombs ed.

ed from the city by Henry VIII, was sent by royal of his ancestors, at Melrose.-Godscroft. In 1545, authority to serve against the Scots. These, at lord Evers and Latoun again entered Scotland

Colond settling his ransom, he found still more exorbitant

in their exactions than the monarch.-Redpath's with an army, consisting of 3000 mercenaries, 1500 English borderers, and 700 assured Scottish

Border History, p. 553. Evers was much regret. men, chiefly Armstrongs, Turnbulls, and other

ted by king Henry, who swore to avenge his death broken clans. In this second incursion, the En- upon Angus; against whom he conceived himself glish generals even exceeded their former cruelty."

to have particular grounds of resentment, on acEvers burned the tower of Broomhouse, with its

count of favours received by the earl at his hands,

The answer of Angus was worthy of a Douglas. lady (a noble and aged woman, says Lesley,) and her whole family. The English penetrated as far

“ Is our brother-in-law offended, "* said he, “ihat as Melrose, which they had destroyed last year, 1, as a goo

I, as a good Scotsman, have avenged my ravaged and which they now again pillaged. As they re

country, and the defaced tombs of my ancestors, turned towards Jedburg, they were followed by upon Ralph Evers! They were better men than Angus, at the head of 1000 horse, who was shortly"

|he, and I was bound to do no lessand will he

take my life for that! Little knows king Henry after joined by the famous Norman Lesley, with a bods of Fife-men. The English, being probably

the skirts of Kirnetable:t I can keep myself there

against all his English host.”—Godscroft. unwilling to cross the Teviot while the Scots hung agar

Such was the noted battle of Ancram Moor. upon their rear, halted upon Ancram moor, above the village of that name; and the Scottish general,

| The spot on which it was fought is called Lyliard's was deliberating whether to advance or retire,

Edge, from an Amazonian Scottish woman of that

name, who is reported, by tradition, to have diswhen sir Walter Scott* of Buccleuch came up, at full speed, with a small but chosen body of his linguished herself in the same manner as squire

' Witherington. The old people point out her moretainers, the rest of whom were near at hand. By the advice of this experienced warrior (tol pument, now broken and defaced. The inscription

is said to have been legible within this century, whose conduct Pitscottie and Buchanan ascribe the success of the engagement,) Angus withdrew

and to have run thus: from the height which he occupied, and drew up Fair maiden Lylliard lies under this stane, his forces behind it, upon a piece of low flat ground,

Little was her stature, but great was her fame;

| Upon the English louns she laid mony thumps, called Panier-heugh, or Peniel-heugh. The spare And when her legs were cutted off, she fought upon her horses, being sent to an eminence in their rear,

stumps.

Vide Account of the Parish of Melrose. . The editor has found no instance upon record of this

It appears, from a passage in Stowe, that an anfamily having taken assurance with England. Hence they usually suffered dreadfully from the English forays. cestor of lord Evers held also a grant of Scottish In August, 1544 (the year preceding the battle,) the whole lands from an English monarch. “I have seen,” Jands belonging to Buccleuch, in West Teviotdale, were says the historian, “under the broad seale of the harried by Evers; the out-works, or barnkin, of the tower

said king Edward I, a manor called Ketnes, in of Branxholm, burned; eight Scots slain, thirty made prisoners, and an immense prey of horses, cattle, and the countie of Ferfare, in Scotland, and peere the Sheep, carried off. The lands upon Kale Water, belong-furthest part of the same nation northward, given ing to the same chieftain, were also plundered, and much

oil obtained: thirty Scots slain, and the Moss Tower (a | Angus had married the widow of James IV, sister förtross near Eckford) smoked very sore. Thus Buccleuch king Henry VIII. had a long account to settle at Ancram Moor.-Murdin's + Kirnetable, now called Cairntable, is a mountainous State Papers, pp. 45, 46.

tract at the head of Douglasdale,

to John Eure and his heirs, ancestor to the lord|tle, until their ferocity occasioned their being ex. Eure that now is, and for his service done in these tirpated, about forty years ago. Their appearance partes, with market, &c. dated at Lanercost, the was beautiful, being milk white, with black muz. 20th day of October, anno regis, 34."-Stowe'8 zles, horns, and hoofs. The bulls are described Annals, p. 210. This grant, like that of Henry, by ancient authors, as having white manes; but must have been dangerous to the receiver.

those of latter days had lost that peculiarity, per2. There is a nun in Dryburgh bower.- P. 404. Thaps by intermixture with the tame breed.***. The oircumstance of the nun, “who never saw In detailing the death of the regent Murray, the day,” is not entirely imaginary. About fifty which is made the subject of the following ballad. years ago, an unfortunate female wanderer took it would be injustice to my reader to use other up her residence in a dark vault, among the ruins words than those of Dr. Robertson, whose account of Dryburgh-abbey, which, during the day, she of that memorable event forms a beautiful piece of never quilled. When night fell, she issued from historical painting. this miserable habitation, and went to the house Hamilton of Bothwellhaugh was the person of Mr. Haliburton, of Newmains, the editor's who committed this barbarous action. He had great-grandfather, or to that of Mr. Erskine, of been condemned to death soon after the battle of Shielfield, two gentlemen of the neighbourhood. Langside, as we have already related, and uwed From their charity she obtained such necessaries his life to the regent's clemency. But part of his as she could be prevailed upon to accept. At estate had been bestowed upon one of the regent's twelve, each night, she lighted her candle, and favourites,+ who siezed his house, and turned out returned to her vault; assuring her friendly neigh- his wife, naked, in a cold night, into the open bours that, during her absence, her habitation was helds, where, before next morning, she became arranged by a spirit, to whom she gave the un- furiously mad. This injury made a deeper im couth name of Fatlips; describing him as a little pression on him than the benefit he had received, man, wearing heavy iron shoes, with which he and from that moment he vowed to be revenged of trampled the clay floor of the vault, to dispel the the regent. Party rage strengthened and inflamed damps. This circumstance caused her to be re- his private resentment. His kinsmen, the Hamil. garded, by the well-informed, with compassion, as

tons, applauded the enterprise. The maxims of deranged in her understanding; and by the vulgar, that age justified the most desperate course he with some degree of terror.The cause of her could take to obtain vengeance. He followed the adoptiog this extraordinary mode of life she would regent for some time, and watched for an oppor never explain. It was, however, believed to have tunity to strike the blow. He resolved, at last, to been occasioned by a vow, that, during the absence wait till his enemy should arrive at Linlithgow, of a man, to whom she was attached, she would through which he was to pass, in his way from never look upon the sun. Her lover never re. Stirling to Edinburgh. He took his stand in a turned. He fell during the civil war of 1745-6, wooden gallery, which had a window towards the and she never more would behold the light of day. street; spread a feather-bed on the floor, to hioder

The vault, or rather dungeon, in which this uni- the noise of his feet from being heard; hung up a fortunate woman lived and died, passes still by black cloth behind him, that his shadow might not the name of the supernatural being, with which be observed from without; and, after all this preits gloom was tenanted by her disturbed imagina- paration, calmly expected the regent's approach, tion, and few of the neighbouring peasants dare

who had lodged, during the night, in a house not enter it by night.

far distant. Some indistinct information of the

danger which threatened him had been conveyed CADYOW CASTLE.

to the regent, and he paid so much regard to it,

that he resolved to return by the same gate through ADDRESSED TO THE

which he had entered, and to fetch a compass round RIGHT HON. LADY ANNE HAMILTON. the town. But, as the crowd about the gate was The ruins of Cadyow, or Cadzow castle, the an- great,

great, and he himself unacquainted with fear, be cient baronial residence of the family of Hamilton,

proceeded directly along the street; and the throng are situated upon the precipitous banks of the ri-lo people o

of people obliging him to move very slowly, gare ver Evan, about two miles above its junction with the assassin time to take so true an aim, that he the Clyde. It was dismantled in the conclusion of sh

ion of shot him, with a single bullet, through the lower the civil wars, during the reign of the unfortunate part of his belly, and killed the horse of a gentleMary, to whose cause the house of Hamilton de- man, who rode on his other side. His followers voted themselves with a generous zeal, which oc

instantly endeavoured to break into the house casioned their temporary obscurity, and, very

whence the blow had come; but they found the nearly, their total ruin. The situation of the ruins,

à door strongly barricaded, and, before it could be embosomed in wood. darkened by ivy and creené torced open, Hamilton had mounted a fleet horse. 6 ing shrubs, and overhanging the brawling torrent,

which stood ready for him at a back-passage, and is romantic in the highest degree. In the immediate vicinity of Cadyow is a grove of immense.

They were formerly kept in the park at Drumlanrig

and are still to be seen at Chillingham castle in Northun oaks. the remains of the Caledonian forest, which | berland. For their nature and ferocity, see Notes. anciently extended through the south of Scotland, † This was sir James Ballenden,' lord-justice-elerk from the Eastern to the Atlantic Ocean. Some of whose shameful and inhuman rapacity occasioned the these trees measure twenty-five feet, and upwards. | catastrophe in the text.-Spottiswoode. in circumference, and the state of decay, in which I which it was attached was the property of the archbishop

| This projecting gallery is still shown. The house to they now appear, shows, that they may have wit-of St. Andrews, a natural brother of the duke of Chalet nessed the rites of the druids. The whole scenery herault, and uncle to Both wellhaugh. This, among many is included in the muguificent and extensive dark other circumstances, seems to evince the aid which Bothof the duke of Hamilton. There was long preserv

wellhaugh received from his clan in effecting his purpose.

The gift of lord John Hamilton, commendator of Ar d in this forest the breed of the Scottish wild cat- broath.

s

the Scots, in the act of A:.be the main body of

u

vers, and sir Brian Latoun

nepe.........................

NOTES.

appeared to the English to be the main body of 1. BATTLE OF ANCRAM MOOR.-P. 403. the Scots, in the act of flight. Under this persua. Lord Evers, and sir Brian Latoun, during the sion, Evers and Latoun hurried precipitately foryear 1544, committed the most dreadful ravages ward, and, baving ascended the hill, which their upon the Scottish frontiers, compelling most of the foes had abandoned, were no less dismayed than inhabitants, and especially the men of Liddesdale, astonished, lo find the phalanx of Scottish spearto take assurance under the king of England. Upon men drawn up, in firm array, upon the flat ground the 17th of November, in that year, the sum total below. The Scots in their turn became the asof their depredations stood thus, in the bloody sailants. A heron, roused from the marshes by the leger of lord Evers.

tumult, soared away betwixt the encountering arTowns, towers, barnekynes, pa

mies: “O!” exclaimed Angus, “ that I had here ryshe churches, bastill houses,

my white goss hawk, that we might all yoke at burned and destroyed......... 192 once!”—Godscroft. The English, breathless and Scots slain..

403 fatigued, having the setting sun and wind full in Prisoners taken................

816 their faces, were unable to withstand the resolute Nolt (cattle)...................

and desperate charge of the Scottish lances. No

12,492 sooner had they begun to waver, than their own Nags and geldings.............. 1,296 allies, the assured borderers, who had been waitGayt..........................

• 200

ing the event, threw aside their red crosses, and, Bolls of corn................... 850 joining their countrymen, made a most merciless Insight gear, &c. (furniture) an incalcula slaughter among the English fugitives, the purble quantity.

suers calling upon each other to “remember Murdins State Papers, vol. i, p. 51.

Broomhouse!" - Lesley, p. 478. In the battle fell The king of England had promised to these two

lord Evers, and his son, together with sir Brian barons a feudal grant of the country, which they Laloun, and 800 Englishmen, many of whom were had thus reduced to a desert; upon hearing which, 1 persons of rank. A thousand prisoners were taken. Archibald Douglas, the seventh earl of Angus, isi

Among these was a patriotic alderman of London, said to have sworn to write the deed of investiture

Read by name, who, having contumaciously reupon their skins, with sbarp pens and bloody ink, fused to pay his portion of a benevolence, demandin resentment for their having defaced the tombs ed from the city by Henry VIII, was sent by royal of his ancestors, at Melrose. — Godscroft. In 1545, auth

authority to serve against the Scots. These, at

settling his ransom, he found still more exorbitant lord Evers and Latoun again entered Scotland |

in their exactions than the monarch.- Redpath's with an army, consisting of 3000 mercenaries. In 1500 English borderers, and 700 assured Scottish

Border History, p. 553. Evers was much regret. men, chiefly Armstrongs, Turnbulls, and other

ted by king Henry, who swore to avenge his death broken clans. In this second incursion, the En-upon Angus; against whom he conceived himself glish generals even exceeded their former cruelty. to na

to have particular grounds of resentment, on acEvers burned the tower of Broomhouse, with its

count of favours received by the earl at his hands.

The answer of Angus was worthy of a Douglas. lady (a noble and aged woman, says Lesley,) and ber whole family. The English penetrateř'as far Is our brother-in-law offended,” said he, “ that as Melrose, which they had destroyed last year. 15, as a good Scotsman, have avenged my ravaged

'y, and the defaced tombs and which they now again pillaged. As they re

my ancestors, turned towards Jedburg, they were followed by upon Ralph Evers? They were better men than Angus, at the head of 1000 horse, who was shortly be, and

he, and I was bound to do no less—and will he after joined by the famous Norman Lesley, with

take my life for that! Little knows king Henry a body of Fife-men. The English, being probably

the skirts of Kirnetable:t I can keep myself there unwilling to cross the Teviot while the Scots hung again

te hun against all his English host.”—Godscroft.

| Such was the noted battle of Ancram Moor. upon their rear, halted upon Ancram moor, above the village of that nane; and the Scottish general

The spot on which it was fought is called Lyliard's was deliberating whether to advance or retire,

Edge, from an Amazonian Scottish woman of that when sir Walter Scott* of Buccleuch came up. at

name, who is reported, by tradition, to bave disfull speed, with a small but chosen body of his linguished herself in the same manner as squire retainers, the rest of whom were near at hand.

Witherington. The old people point out her moBy the advice of this experienced warrior (tonument, now broken and defaced. The inscription

is said to have been legible within this century, whose conduct Pitscottie and Buchanan ascribe the success of the engagement,) Angus withdrew

and to have run thus: from the height which he occupied, and drew up Fair maiden Lylliard lies under this stane, his forces behind it, upon a piece of low flat ground,

Little was her stature, but great was her fame; called Panier-heugh, or Peniel-heugh. The spare And when her legs were cutted off, she fought upon her

Upon the English louns she laid mony thumps, horses, being sent to an eminence in their rear,

stumps.

* Vide Account of the Parish of Melrose. The editor has found no instance upun record of this family having taken assurance with England. Hence

It appears, from a passage in Stowe, that an anthey usually suffered dreadfully from the English forays. cestor of lord Evers held also a grant of Scottish In August, 1544 (the year preceding the battle,) the whole lands from an English monarch. “I have seen,” lands belonging to Buccleuch, in West Tevioldalo, were

Tahad

says the historian, “under the broad seale of the harried by Evers; the out-works, or barnkin, of the tower

said king Edward I, a manor called Ketnes, in of Branxholm, burned; eight Scots slain, thirty made prisoners, and an immense prey of horses, cattle, and the countie of Ferfare, in Scotland, and peere the sheep, carried off. The lands upon Kale Water, belong. furthest part of the same nation northward, given ing to the same chieftain, were also plundered, and much spoil obtained; thirty Scots slain, and the Moss Tower (a * Angus had married the widow of James IV, sister -fortress near Eckford) smoked very sore. Thus Buccleuch king Henry VIII. had a long account to settle at Ancram Moor.-Murdin's + Kiruetable, now called Cairnta State Papers, pp. 45, 46.

tract at the head of Douglasdale,

MISIJCUDIC HUW Calcu alble.

A mouOwinou

to John Eure and his heirs, ancestor to the lord tle, until their ferocity occasioned their being ex. Eure that now is, and for his service done in these tirpated, about forty years ago. Their appearance partes, with market, &c. dated at Lanereost, the was beautiful, being milk white, with black muz20th day of October, anno regis, 34."-Stowe's zles, horns, and hoofs. The bulls are described Annals, p. 210. This grant, like that of Henry, by ancient authors, as having white manes; but must have been dangerous to the receiver.

those of latter days had lost that peculiarity, per2. There is a nun in Dryburgh bower.- P. 404. haps by intermixture with the tame breed.** The circumstance of the nun, “who never saw In detailing the death of the regent Murray, the day,” is not entirely imaginary. About fifty which is made the subject of the following ballad. years ago, an unfortunate female wanderer took it would be injustice to my reader to use other up her residence in a dark vault, among the ruins words than those of Dr. Robertson, whose account of Dryburgh-abbey, which, during the day, she of that memorable event forms a beautiful piece of never quilled. When night fell, she issued from historical painting. this miserable habitation, and went to the house “Hamilton of Bothwellhaugh was the person of Mr. Haliburton, of Newmains, the editor's who committed this barbarous action. He had great-grandfather, or to that of Mr. Erskine, of been condemned to death soon after the battle of Shielfield, two gentlemen of the neighbourhood. Langside, as we have already related, and uwed From their charity she obtained such necessaries his life to the regent's clemency. But part of his as she could be prevailed upon to accept. At estate had been bestowed upon one of the regent's twelve, each night, she lighted her candle, and favourites,+ who siezed his house, and turned out returned to her vault; assuring her friendly neigh- his wife, naked, in a cold night, into the open bours that, during her absence, her habitation was fields, where, before next morning, she became arranged by a spirit, to whom she gave the un- furiously mad. This injury made a deeper imcouth name of Fatlips; describing him as a little pression on him than the benefit he had received, man, wearing heavy iron shoes, with which he and from that moment he vowed to be revenged of trampled the clay floor of the vault, to dispel the the regent. Party rage strengthened and inflamed damps. This circumstance caused her to be re- his private resentment. His kinsmen, the Hamilgarded, by the well-informed, with compassion, as tons, applauded the enterprise. The maxims of deranged in her understanding; and by the vulgar,

that age justified the most desperate course he with some degree of terror. The cause of her could take to obtain vengeance. He followed the adopting this extraordinary mode of life she would regent for some time, and watched for an oppornever explain. It was, however, believed to bave tunity to strike the blow. He resolved, at last, to been occasioned by a vow, that, during the absence wait till bis enemy should arrive at Linlithgow, of a man, to whom she was attached, she would through which he was to pass, in his way from never look upon the sun. Her lover never re. Stirling to Edinburgh. He took his stand in a turned. He fell during the civil war of 1745-6, wooden gallery,which had a window towards the and she never more would behold the light of day. street; spread a feather-bed on the floor, to hinder

The vault, or rather dungeon. in which this un. the noise of his feet from being heard: hung up a fortunate woman lived and died, passes still by black cloth behind him, that his shadow might not the name of the supernatural being, with which be observed from without; and, after all this preits gloom was tenanted by her disturbed imagina- paration, calmly expected the regent's approach, tion, and few of the neighbouring peasants dare who had lodged, during the night, in a house not enter it by night.

far distant. Some indistinct information of the

danger which threatened him had been conveyed CADYOW CASTLE.

to the regent, and he paid so much regard to it,

that he resolved to return by the same gate through ADDRESSED TO THE

which he had entered, and to fetch a compass round RIGHT HON. LADY ANNE HAMILTON the town. But, as the crowd about the gate was The ruins of Cadyow, or Cadzow castle, the and great, and he himself unacquainted with fear, he cient baronial residence of the family of Hamilton,

proceeded directly along the street; and the throng are situated upon the precipitous banks of the ri- of peop

the precipitous banks of the rir of people obliging him to move very slowly, gave ver Evan, about two miles above its junction with the assassi

with the assassin time to take so true an aim, that he the Clyde. It was dismantled in the conclusion of sho

shot him, with a single bullet, through the lower the civil wars, during the reign of the unfortunate part

ste part of his belly, and killed the horse of a gentleMary, to whose cause the house of Hamilton de- man, who rode on his other side. His followers voted themselves with a generous zeal, which oc

instantly endeavoured to break into the house casioned their temporary obscurity, and, very

whence the blow had come; but they found the nearly, their total ruin. The situation of the ruins,

door strongly barricaded, and, before it could be embosomed in wood, darkened by ivy and creep

forced open, Hamilton had mounted a fleet horse, $ ing shrubs, and overhanging the brawling torrent,

| which stood ready for him at a back-passage, and is romantic in the highest degree. In the immediate vicinity of Cadyow is a grove of immense

• They were formerly kept in the park at Drumlanrig, oaks. the remains of the Caledonian forest, which berland. For their nature and ferocity, see Notes.

and are still to be seen at Chillingham castle in Northum anciently extended through the south of Scotland, + This was sir James Ballenden, lord-justice-elerk from the Eastern to the Atlantic Ocean. Some of whose shameful and inhuman rapacity occasioned the these trees measure twenty-five feet, and upwards,

catastrophe in the text.-Spottiswoode. in circumference, and the state of decay, in which I which it was attached was the property of the archbishop

This projecting gallery is still shown. The house to they now appear, shows, that they may have wit-of St. Andrews, a nessed the rites of the druids. The whole scenery herault, and uncle to Both wellhaugh. This, among many is included in the maguificent and extensive park other circumstances, seems to evince the aid which Bothof the duke of Hamilton. There was

wellhaugh received from his clan in effecting his purpose.

Preserve The gift of lord John Hamilton, commendator of Ar. d in this forest the breed of the Scottish wild cat-I broath.

was got far beyond their reach. The regent died: To draw oblivion's pall aside.
the same night of his wound.-History of Scot- And mark the long forgotteo urn.
lund, book v.

Then, noble maid! at thy command,
Bóth wellhaugh rode straight to Hamilton, where

Again the crumbled halls shall rise; he was received in triumph; for the ashes of the!

Lo! as on Evan's banks we stand, houses in Clydesdale, which had been burned by

The past returns, the present fies. Murray's army, were yet smoking; and party prejudice, the habits of the age, and the enormity of

Where with the rock's wood-covered side the provocation, seemed to his kinsmen to justify

Were blended late the ruins green, his dced. After a short abode at Hamilton, this

Rise turrets in fantastic pride, fierce and determined man left Scotland, and serv And feudal banners flaunt between. ed in France, under the patronage of the family Where the rude torrent's brawling course of Guise, to whom he was doubtless recommended Was shagged with thorn and tangling sloe, by having avenged the cause of their niece, queen The ashler buttress braves its force, Mary, upon her ungrateful brother. De Thou has

And ramparts frown in battled row. recorded, that an attempt was made to engage him to assassinate Gaspar de Coligni, the famous ad

'Tis night: the shade of keep and spire miral of France, and the buckler of the Huguenot

Obscurely dance on Evan's stream, cause. But the character of Bothwellhaugh was

And on the wave the warder's fire mistaken. He was no mercenary trader in blood,

Is chequering the moonlight beam. and rejected the offer with contempt and indigna. Fades slow their light; the east is gray; tion. He had no authority, he said, from Scotland,

The weary warder leaves his tower; to commit murders in France; he had avenged his Steeds snort; uncoupled stag-hounds bay, own just quarrel, but he would neither, for price And merry hunters quit the bower. nor prayer, avenge that of another man.-Thuanus,

The drawbridge falls, they hurry out; cap. 46.

Clatters each plank and swinging chain, The regent's death happened 230 January, 1569.

As, dashing o'er, the jovial rout It is applauded, or stigmatized, by contemporary historians, according to their religious or party

Urge the shy steed, and slack the rein. prejudices. The triumph of Blackwood is un First of his troop, the chief rode on;1 bounded. He not only extols the pious feat of His shouting merrymen throng behind; Bothwellhaugh, “ who,” he observes, “ satisfied, I

The steed of princely Hamilton with a single ounce of lead, him, whose sacrile Was fleeter than the mountain wind. gious avarice had stripped the metropolitan church

From the thick copse the roebucks bound, of St. Andrews of its covering;” but he ascribes it

The startling red deer scuds the plain; to immediate Divine inspiration, and the escape For the hoarse bugle's warrior sound of Hamilton to little less than the miraculous in

Has roused their mountain haunts again. terference of the Deity.--Jebb, vol. ii, p. 263. With

Through the huge oaks of Evandale, equal injustice it was, by others, made the ground of a general national reflection; for, when Mather Whose limbs a thousand years have worn, urged Berney to assassinate Burleigh, and quoted

What sullen roar comes down the gale, the examples of Poltrot and Bothwellhaugh, the And drowns the hunter's pealing horn! other conspirators answered, “that neither Pol Mightiest of all the beasts of chase, trot nor Hambleton did attempt their enterpryse, That roam in woody Caledon, without some reason or consideration to lead them Crashing the forest in his race, to it: as the one, by hyre, and promise of prefer

The mountain bull comes thundering on.s ment or rewarde; the other, upon desperate mind

Fierce, on the hunters' quivered band, of revenge, for a lyule wrong done unto him, as

He rolls his eye of swarthy glow, the report goethe, accordinge to the vyle trayterous

Spurns, with black hoof and horn, the sand, disposysyon of the hoole natyon of the Scottes." Murdin's Slute Papers, vol. i, p. 197.

And tosses high his mane of snow.

Aimed well, the chieftain's lance has flown; WHEN princely Hamilton's abode

Struggling in blood the savage lies; Ennobled Cadyow's Gothic towers,

His roar is sunk in hollow groan! The song went round, the goblet flow'd,

Sound, merry huntsmen! sound the pryse! And revel sped the laughing hours.

'Tis noon: against the knotted oak Then, thrilling to the harp's gay sound,

The hunters rest the idle spear; So sweetly rung each vaulted wall,

Curls through the trees the slender smoke, And echoed light the dancer's bound,

Where yeomen dight the woodland cheer. As mirth and music cheered the hall.

Proudly the chieftain marked his clan, But Cadyow's towers, in ruins laid,

On greenwood lap all careless thrown, And vaults, by ivy mantled o'er,

Yet missed his eye the boldest man, Thrill to the music of the shade,

That bore the name of Hamilton. Or echo Evan's hoarser roar.

" Why fills not Bothwellhaugh his place, Yet still, of Cadyow's faded fame,

Still wont our weal and wo to share? You bid me tell a minstrel tale,

Why comes he not our sport to grace? And tune my harp, of border frame,

Why shares he not our hunter's fare?" On the wild banks of Evandale.

Stern Claud replied, with darkening face, For thou, from scenes of courtly pride,

(Gray Pasley's haughty lord was he,)3 From pleasure's lighter scenes, canst turn, Pryse-The vote blown at the death of the game.

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