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here they lay by it for a little while, crying out, because of their pangs, “ If you see my beloved, tell him that I am sick of love." * *

So I saw that, when they awoke, they addressed themselves to go un to the great city. But, as I said, the reflection of the sun upon the city, for the city was of pure gold, was so extremely gloriou, that they could not as yet with open face behold it, but through an nstrumeut niade for that purpose. So I saw that, as they went on, there mat them two men in raiment that shone like gold; also their i-.ces slione as thic light.

These men asked the pilgrims whence they came. They also asked thein where they had lodged, what difficulties and dangers, what coni. forts and pleasures, they had met with in the way! and they told them. Then said the men that met them, You have but two difficulties more to meet with, and then you are in the city.

Christian and his companion then asked the men to go along with them; so they told them that they would. But, said they, you must obtain it by your own faith. So I saw in my dream that they went on together till they came in sight of the gate.

Now, I further saw that betwixt them and the gate was a river, but there was no bridge to go over, and the river was very deep. At the sight, therefore, of this river, the pilgrims were much stunned; but the men that went with them said, You must go through, or you cannot come to the gate.

The pilgrims then began to inquire if there was no other way to the gate? To which they answered, Yes, but there hath not any, save two, to wit, Enoch and Elijah, been permitted to tread that path since the foundation of the world, nor shall, until the last trumper shali sound. The pilgrims then, especially Christian, began to de. spond in their minds, and looked this way and that; but no way could üs found by them by which they might escape the river. Then they asked the men if the waters were all of a depth? They said, No; yet they could not help them in that case; for, said they, you shall find it deener or shallower, as you believe in the king of the place.

They then addressed themselves to the water, and, entering, Christian began to sink, and crying out to his good friend Hopeful, he said, I sink in deep waters: the billows go over my head; all the waters zu over me. Selah.

Then said the other, Be of good cheer, my brother; I feel the bof. loin, and it is good. Then said Christian, Ah! my friend, the surro'YA of death hath encompassed me about; I shall not see the land that Dows with milk and honey. And with that a great darkness and ho!« ror sell upon Christian, so that he could not see before him. As here, in a great measure, he lost his senses, so that he could neither reinrimber nor orderly talk of any of those sweet refreshments that he had met with in the way of his pilgrimage. * * * Then I saw in my dream that Christian was in a muse a while. To whom, also, Hopesul added these words, Be of good cireer; Jesus Christ maketh thee whole: and with that Christian brake out with a loud voice, O! I see him again, and he tells me, “When thou passest through the waters, I will be with thee; and through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee.” Then they both took courage; and the enemy was after that as still as a stone, until they were gone over. Christian, therefore, presently found ground to stand upon, and so it followed that the rest nf the river was but shallow, but thus they got over.

EDWARD UYDE, EARL OF CLARENDON. 1608-1674. (Man.

ual, pp. 225-227.)
FROM “THE HISTORY OF THE GREAT Rebellion.”

156. CHARACTER OF JOHN HAMPDEN. Mr. IIampden was a man of much greater cunning, and, it may be, of the most discerning spirit, and of the greatest address and insinuation to bring anything to pass which he desired, of any man of that time, and who laid the design deepest. He was a gentleman of a good extraction, and a fair fortune; who, from a life of great pleasure and license, had on a sudden retired to extraordinary sobriety and strictness, and yet retained his usual cheerfulness and affability; which, together with the opinion of his wisdom and justice, and the courage he had shown in opposing the ship-money, raised his reputation to a very great height, not only in Buckinghamshire, where he lived, but generally throughout the kingdom. He was not a man of many words, and rarely begun the discourse, or made the first entrance upon any business that was assumed; but a very weighty speaker; and after he had heard a full debate, and observed how the house was like to be inclined, took up the argument, and shortly, and clearly, and craftily so stated it, that he commonly conducted it to the conclusion he desired; and if he found he could not do that, he was never without the dexterity to divert the debate to another time, and to prevent the determining anything in the negative, which might prove inconvenient in the future. * * * *

He was rather of reputation in his own country, than of public discourse, or fame in the kingdom, before the business of ship-money; but then he grew the argument of all tongues, every man inquiring who and what he was, that durst, at his own charge, support the lib:ity and property of the kingdom, and rescue his country, as he thought, from being made a prey to the court. His carriage, through.

t this agitation, was with that rare temper and modesty, that they who watched hiin narrowly to find some advantage against his person, to make him less resolute in his cause, were compelled to give tim a just testimony. He was of that rare affability and temper in dibate, and of that seeming humility and submission of judgment, as il ne trought no opinion of his own with him, but a desire of infor mation and instruction; yet he had so subtle a way of interrogating, and, under the notion of doubts, insinuating his objections, that he infused his own opinions into those from whom he pretended to learn and receive them. And even with them who were able to preserve theinselves from his infusions, and discerned those opinions to be fixe: in him, with which they could not comply, he always lett the character of an ingenious and conscientious person. He was, indeed, a very wise man, and of great parts, and possessed with the most ah. solute spirit of popularity, and the most absolute faculties to governi the people, of any man I ever knew.

In the first entrance into the troubles, he undertook the command ”) a regiment of foot, and performed the duty of a colonel, upon all occasions, most punctually. He was very temperate in diet, and a supreme governor over all his passions and affections, and had there. by a great power over other men's. He was of an industry and vigilance not to be tired out, or wearied by the most laborious; and ci paits not to be imposed upon by the subtle or sharp; and of a per: sonal courage equal to his best parts: so that he was an enemy not to be wished, wherever he might have been made a friend; and as much to be apprehended where he was so, as any man could deserve to be. And therefore his death was no less pleasing to the one party, than it was condoled in the other.

157. EXECUTION OF MOXTROSE. As soon as he had ended his discourse, he was ordered to withdraw; a.nd after a short space, was brought in, and told by the chancellor, " that he was, on the morrow, being the one-and-twentieth of May, 1650, to be carried to Edinburgh cross, and there to be hanged on a gallows thirty foot high, for the space of three hours, and then to be taken down, and his head to be cut off upon a scaffold, and hanged or Edinburgh tollbooth; and his legs and arms to be hanged up in other public towns of the kingdom, and his body to be buried at the place where he was to be executed, except the kirk should take off his excommunication; and then his body might be buried in the common place of burial.” He desired “that he might say somewhat to them," but was not suffered, and so was carried back to the prison. * * •

The next day they executed every part and circumstance of that bar. barous sentence, with all the inhumanity imaginable; and he bore it wiili all the courage and magnanimity, and the greatest piety, that a god Christian could manifest. He magnified the virtue, courage, and religion of the last king, exceedingly commended the justice and goodness, and understanding of the present king, and prayed “tlat they might not betray him as they had done his father.” When he had ended all lie meant to say, and was expecting to expire, they had yet one scene more to act of their tyranny. The hangman brought the book that had been published of his truly heroic actions, whilst he had commanded in that kingdom, which book was tied in a small cord that was put about his neck. The marquis siniled at this new instance of their malice, and thanked them for it, and said, “he was pleased that it should be there, and was prouder of wearing it than ever he had been of the garter;” and so renewing some devout ejaculations he patiently endured the last act of the executioner.

Thus died the gallant Marquis of Montrose, after he had given as great a testimony of loyalty and courage as a subject can do, and per. formed as wonderful actions in several battles, upon as great inequality of numbers, and as great disadvantages in respect of arms, and other preparations for war, as have been performed in this age. He was a gentleman of a very ancient extraction, many of whose ancestors had exercised the highest charges under the king in that kingdom, and had been allied to the crown itself. He was of very good parts, which were improved by a good education : he had always a great emulation, or rather a great contempt of the Marquis of Argyle (as he was too apt to contemn those he did not love), who wanted nothing but honesty and courage to be a very extraordinary man, having all other good talents in a great degree. Montrose was in his nature fearless of danger, and never declined any enterprise for the difficulty of going through with it, but exceedingly affected those which seemed desperate to other men, and did believe somewhat to be in himself which other men were not acquainted with, which made him live more easily towards those who were, or were willing to be, inferior to him (towards whom he exercised wonderful civility and generosity), than with his superiors or equals. He was naturally jealous, and suspected those who did not concur with him in the way, not to mean so well as he. He was not without vanity, but his virtues were much superior, and he well deserved to have his memory preserved and celebrated amongst the most illustrious persons of the age in which he lived.

158. IZAAK WALTON. 1593–1683. (Manual, p. 227.)

FROM "THE COMPLETE ANGLER.”

FISHING But turn out of the way a little, good scholar, towards yonder high honeysuckle hedge; there we'll sit and sing whilst this shower falls so zently upon the teeming earth, and gives yet a sweeter smell to the lovely flowers that adorn these verdant meadows.

Look, under that broad beech-tree, I sat down when I was last this way a fishing, and the birds in the adjoining grove seemed to have a friendly contention with an echo, whose dead voice seemed to live in a hollow tree, near to the brow of that primrose-hill; there I sat viewing the silver streams glide silently towards their centre, the tempestuous sea; yet sometimes opposed by rugged roots and pebble stones. which broke their waves, and turned them into foam: and sometimes I beguiled time by viewing the harmless lambs, some leaping securely in the cool shade, whilst others sported themselves in the cheerful sun, and saw others craving comfort from the swollen udders of their Lltating dains. As I thus sat, these and other sights had so fully possessed my soul with content, that I thought, as the poet has happily expressed it,

'Twas for that time lifted above earth,
And possessed joys not promised in my birth.

As left this place, and entered into the next field, a second please ure: entertained me; it was a handsome milkmaid that had not yet attained so much age and wisdom as to load her mind with any fears of many things that will never be, as too many men too often do; but she cast away all care, and sung like a nightingale: her voice was good, and the ditty fitted for it: it was that smooth song which was made by Kit Marlow, now at least fifty years ago; and the milkmaid's mother sung an answer to it, which was made by Sir Walter Raleigh in his younger days.

They were old-fashioned poetry, but choicely good; I think much better than the strong lines that are now in fashion in this critical age. Look yonder! on my word, yonder they both be a-milking again. I will give her the chub, and persuade them to sing those two songs to us.

CONTENTMENT.

I knew a man that had health and riches, and several houses, all beautiful and ready furnished, and would often trouble himself and family to be removing from one house to another; and being asked by a friend why he removed so often from one house to another, replied, “It was to find content in some of them.” But his friend, knowing his temper, told him, “If he would find content in any of his houses, he must leave himself behind him; for content will never dwell but in a meek and quiet soul.” And this may appear, if we read and consider what our Saviour says in St. Matthew's Gospel, for He there says, “ Blessed be the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy. Blessed be thc pure in heart, for they shall see God. Blessed be the poor in spirit, for 11:21:s is the kingdom of heaven. And blessed be the meek, for they shall possess the earth.” Not that the meek shall not also obtain mercy, and see God, and be com orted, and at last come to the kingdom of heaven; but, in the mean time, he, and he only, possesser the earth, as he goes toward that kingdom of heaven, by being h:unble and checrful, and content with what his good God has allotted him. lle has no turbulent, repining, vexatious thoughts that he deserves better; nor is vexed when he sees others possessed of more honor og

aore riches than his wise God has allotted for his share; but he pos. sesses what he has with a meek and contented quietness, such a quiet ness as makes his very dreams pleasing, both to God and himself.

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