Hooker: Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity

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Cambridge University Press, 1989/08/25 - 247 ページ
The great Elizabethan divine Richard Hooker has occupied a prominent place in the intellectual history of the Church of England and sixteenth-century Protestantism but his wider significance has often been neglected. In his introduction to this selection of books from Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity, Professor McGrade demonstrates clearly the continued relevance and importance of the particular politico-religious project Hooker undertook and shows that The Laws offer far more than simply an apologia for the Elizabethan religious settlement. The text of this version is based on the authoritative Folger edition and presents those sections of The Laws most important to an understanding of Hooker's wider aims and context.

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目次

VII
1
IX
2
X
2
XI
20
XII
26
XIII
33
XIV
35
XV
49
XXVII
107
XXVIII
109
XXIX
112
XXX
117
XXXI
120
XXXII
128
XXXIII
139
XXXIV
140

XVI
52
XVII
54
XVIII
58
XIX
64
XX
66
XXI
68
XXII
70
XXIII
74
XXIV
85
XXV
87
XXVI
100
XXXV
158
XXXVI
176
XXXVII
179
XXXVIII
200
XXXIX
208
XL
218
XLI
227
XLII
241
XLIII
243
XLIV
246
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著者について (1989)

Richard Hooker was born around March 1554 in Exeter, England. Born of a humble family, Hooker was able to attend Oxford University due to his patron, John Jewel. He took holy orders in 1581, becoming a clergyman in the Church of England. In 1585 he was named master of the Temple, a position he held until 1591. He married in 1588 and eventually moved in with his father-in-law, where he began writing his major work. Hooker's masterpiece, an eight-volume set called Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity, recounts the strife involving the admonition controversy, a doctrine calling for radical reforms in the Church of England. Hooker's work is a reply to the admonition controversy and to the Roman Catholic Church where he defended the current state of the Anglican church. Hooker generally allowed the scripture to speak for itself concerning his views of the church, but he also relied on tradition and common sense. Richard Hooker became vicar of Bishopsbourne in 1595. Some feel that while he drew his salary as the vicar, he actually allowed a lesser clergyman to perform his duties, a practice known as pluralism. He died there on November 2, 1600.

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