History of the consulate and the empire of France under Napoleon, tr. by D.F. Campbell, 第 7〜8 巻

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85 ページ - It is now several years that I have directed the affairs of Europe, and I have had occasion to convince myself that the grumbling of the privileged classes was contrary to the general opinion. Be a constitutional king. If the reason and the intelligence of your times were not sufficient in your position, good policy would enjoin it.
330 ページ - Austerlitz the anniversary of the coronation; this year, you have worthily celebrated that of the battle of Marengo, which put an end to the war of the second coalition. Frenchmen, you have been worthy of yourselves and of me. You will return to France covered with laurels, and after obtaining a glorious peace, which carries with it the guarantee of its duration. It is high time for our country to live in quiet, screened from the malignant influence of England. My bounties shall prove to you my gratitude,...
317 ページ - ... occasion offered him by Fortune, swayed, it must be confessed, by his genius; for the fault which the Russian army were committing had been inspired, as it were, by him, when he pushed them from the other side of the Alle, and thus forced them to pass in before him, in going to the relief of Konigsberg. The day was far advanced, and it would take several hours to collect all the French troops. Some of Napoleon's lieutenants were, therefore, of opinion that they ought to defer fighting a decisive...
368 ページ - ... strengthening myself towards the Portuguese frontier, carry the war in this direction. " I will attend to your private interests; do not you attend to them yourself. . . . Portugal will remain at my disposal Let no personal plan occupy your attention nor direct your 'conduct; that would injure me, and injure you still more.
334 ページ - ... Charles the Fifth, and the Philip who thought to crush England with the famous Spanish Armada. Napoleon's choice of Joseph was dictated by natural affection, by his always lurking clan respect for the eldest brother, and the fact that he had more confidence in him than in his other brothers. He wrote: "King Charles, by a treaty which I have just concluded with him, has ceded to me all his rights to the crown of Spain. . . . This crown I have destined for you. ... I desire therefore that, immediately...
275 ページ - The breasts of your grenadiers, which you are for bringing in every where, will not throw down walls. You must allow your engineers to act, and listen to the advice of General Chasseloup, who is a man of science, and from whom you ought not to withdraw your confidence at the suggestion of the first petty caviler, pretending to judge of what he is incapable of comprehending.
28 ページ - ... on Prussia: there remains only Austria. The navy of France formerly flourished through the benefit resulting from an alliance with Austria. This power also feels the need of remaining quiet, a sentiment that I partake with all my heart. The house of Austria having often caused hints to be thrown out to me, the present moment, if it knows how to profit by it, is the most favorable.
210 ページ - ... betray his feelings in the bulletin which he published. On that icy plain thousands of dead and dying, cruelly mangled, thousands of prostrate horses, an infinite quantity of dismounted cannon, broken carriages, scattered projectiles, burning hamlets, all this standing out from ay round nfsnow* exhibited a thrilling and terrible spectacle. " This spectacle/' exclaimed Napoleon, " is fit to excite in princes a love of peace and a horror of war!
367 ページ - The Prince of the Asturias has none of the qualities which are indispensable in the head of a nation, but that does not prevent his being set up as a hero to oppose us. I do not wish any violence to be offered to the persons of this family. It is never a good thing to render oneself odious or to inflame hatred. " Spain has more than one hundred...
275 ページ - Do you imagine that we were as brave in '92 as we are now, after fifteen years of war ! Have some indulgence, then, old soldier as you are, for the young soldiers who are starting in the career, and who have not yet your coolness in danger. The Prince of Baden, whom you have with you, has chosen to leave the pleasures of the court, for the purpose of leading his troops into fire. Pay him respect, and give him credit for a zeal which his equals rarely imitate. The breasts of your grenadiers, which...

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