An Anglo-Saxon Grammar: And Derivatives; with Proofs of the Celtic Dialects' Being of Eastern Origin; and an Analysis of the Style of Chaucer, Douglas, and Spenser

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longman, 1832 - 84 ページ
 

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80 ページ - That everie wight to shrowd it did constrain ; And this faire couple eke to shroud themselves were fain. Enforst to seeke some covert nigh at hand, A shadie grove not farr away they spide, That promist ayde the tempest to withstand ; Whose loftie trees, yclad with sommers pride...
83 ページ - Eftsoones they heard a most melodious sound, Of all that mote delight a daintie eare, Such as attonce might not on living ground, Save in this Paradise, be heard elsewhere : Right hard it was for wight which did it heare, To read what manner musicke that mote bee ; For all that pleasing is to living eare Was there consorted in one harmonee ; Birdes, voices, instruments, windes, waters, all agree ; The joyous birdes, shrouded in chearefull shade, Their notes unto the voice attempred sweet ; Th' Angelicall...
83 ページ - There a strange shepherd chanced to find me out, Whether allured with my pipe's delight, Whose pleasing sound yshrilled far about, Or thither led by chance, I know not right: Whom when I asked from what place he came, And how he hight, himself he did ycleepe Raleigh. The Shepherd of the Ocean by name, And said he came far from the main-sea deep.
83 ページ - To th' instruments divine respondence meet: The silver sounding instruments did meet With the base murmure of the waters fall : The waters fall with difference discreet, Now soft, now loud, unto the wind did call : The gentle warbling wind low answered to all.
81 ページ - Joying to heare the birdes sweete harmony, Which, therein shrouded from the tempest dred, Seemd in their song to scorne the cruell sky. Much can they praise the trees so straight and hy, The sayling Pine ; the Cedar proud and tall ; The vine-propp Elme ; the Poplar never dry ; The builder Oake, sole king of forrests all ; The Aspine good for staves ; the Cypresse funerall...
56 ページ - I cannot tell, what you and other men Think of this life; but, for my single self, I had as lief not be, as live to be In awe of such a thing as I m,yself.
81 ページ - And foorth they passe, with pleasure forward led, Joying to heare the birdes sweete harmony, Which, therein shrouded from the tempest dred, .Seemd in their song to scorne the cruell sky. Much can they praise the trees so straight and hy, The sayling Pine ; the Cedar proud and tall...
81 ページ - Like to an almond tree ymounted hye On top of greene Selinis all alone, With blossoms brave bedecked daintily ; Whose tender locks do tremble every one At everie little breath that under heaven is blowne.
69 ページ - Than longen folk to gon on pilgrimages, And palmeres for to seken strange strondes, To serve halwes couthe in sondry londes ; And specially, from every shires ende Of Englelond, to Canterbury they wende, The holy blisful martyr for to seke, That hem hath holpen, whan that they were seke.
v ページ - French in the phrase, and to mere figures fantastically sacrificing the sense— now heavily and regularly fashioned as if by the plumb and rule, and by the eye rather than the ear, •with a needless profusion of ancient words and flexions, to displace those of our own Saxon, instead of temperately supplying its defects. Least of all could those lights of English eloquence have imagined that men should appear...

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