Outlines of Philosophical Education Illustrated by the the Method of Teaching the Logic Class in the University of Glasgow

前表紙
For Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1825 - 527 ページ
 

レビュー - レビューを書く

レビューが見つかりませんでした。

ページのサンプル

他の版 - すべて表示

多く使われている語句

人気のある引用

253 ページ - But the truth is that the knowledge of external nature, and the sciences which that knowledge requires or includes, are not the great or the frequent business of the human mind. Whether we provide for action or conversation, whether we wish to be useful or pleasing, the first requisite is the religious and moral knowledge of right and wrong ; the next is an acquaintance with the history of mankind, and with those examples which may be said to embody truth and prove by events the reasonableness of...
16 ページ - The improvements which, in modern times, have been made in several different branches of philosophy, have not, the greater part of them, been made in universities ; though some no doubt have. The greater part of universities have not even been very forward to adopt those improvements, after they were made ; and several of those learned societies have chosen to remain, for a long time, the sanctuaries in which exploded systems and obsolete prejudices found shelter and protection, after they had been...
253 ページ - Physiological learning is of such rare emergence, that one man may know another half his life without being able to estimate his skill in hydrostatics or astronomy; but his moral and prudential character immediately appears. Those authors, therefore, are to be read at schools that supply most axioms of prudence, most principles of moral truth, and most materials for conversation; and these purposes are best served by poets, orators, and historians.
271 ページ - ... yet nobody expects this from him unless he has been used to it, and has employed time and pains in fashioning and forming his hand, or outward parts, to these motions. Just so it is in the mind, would you have a man reason well, you must use him to it betimes, exercise his mind in observing the connexion of ideas, and following them in train.
271 ページ - Just so it is in the mind; would you have a man reason well, you must use him to it betimes, exercise his mind in observing the connexion of ideas, and following them in train. Nothing does this better than mathematics; which, therefore, I think should be taught all those who have the time and opportunity ; not so much to make them mathematicians, as to make them reasonable creatures...
16 ページ - ... /sanctuaries in which exploded systems and obsolete prejudices found shelter and protection, after they had been hunted out of every other corner of the world.
270 ページ - Nobody is made any thing by hearing of rules, or laying them up in his memory ; practice must settle the habit of doing, without reflecting on the rule ; and you may as well hope to make a good painter, or musician, extempore, by a lecture and instruction in the arts of music and painting, as a coherent thinker, or a strict reasoner, by a set of rules, . showing him wherein right reasoning consists.
270 ページ - I said above, that the faculties of our souls are improved and made useful to us just after the same manner as our bodies are. Would you have a man write or paint, dance or fence well, or perform any other manual operation dexterously and with ease ; let him have ever so much...
25 ページ - ... no longer subservient to the art of disputation, which, at an earlier period, was wont to inflame ambition, and invigorate industry, among youthful academics; and almost the only motive which now remained, to secure attendance upon this part of the course, was the title, thereby procured, of being admitted into the succeeding classes, and particularly into those which qualify candidates for the church. This conviction of the general uselessness, and even positively hurtful consequences, of spending...
365 ページ - II. 52 choice of ten or twelve students, most distinguished by their ahilities and progress; and to them are committed the review of such themes as he cannot himself overtake. These are, in the language of the class, called examinators, a less assuming title than that of critics or censors: to each of them a certain number of themes is committed, for which of course they are accountable, and which they are required to read over carefully, to examine in every part, that they may be able to appreciate...

書誌情報