The Nineteen Tragedies and Fragments of Euripides, 第 1 巻

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J. Walker, T. Payne, Vernor, Hood & Sharpe ... [and 12 others], 1809

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272 ページ - O! why did God, Creator wise, that peopled highest heaven With spirits masculine, create at last This novelty on earth, this fair defect Of nature, and not fill the world at once With men, as angels, without feminine; Or find some other way to generate Mankind?
179 ページ - By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-fac'd moon ; Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line could never touch the ground, And pluck up drowne'd honour by the locks...
252 ページ - NURSE. Why should the sons — ah, wretched me ! — partake Their father's guilt ? Why hat'st thou them ? Ah me ! How greatly, O ye children, do I fear Lest mischief should befall you : for the souls Of kings are prone to cruelty, so seldom Subdued, and over others wont to rule, That it is difficult for such to change Their angry purpose. Happier I esteem The lot of those who still are wont to live Among their equals. May I thus grow old, If not in splendour, yet with safety blest! For first of...
278 ページ - Dearest to me of those with whom I formed A league of friendship in the embattled field. MEDEA. — But, O may you be happy, and obtain All that you wish for.
256 ページ - tis a stranger's duty to adopt The manners of the land in which he dwells ; Nor can I praise that native, led astray By mere perverseness and o'erweening folly, Who bitter enmity incurs from those Of his own city. But, alas ! my friends, This unforeseen calamity hath withered The vigour of my soul. I am undone, Bereft of every joy that life can yield, And therefore wish to die. For as to him, My husband, whom it did import me most To have a thorough knowledge of, he proves The worst of men. But sure...
290 ページ - Speak not so hastily : the gods themselves By gifts are swayed, as fame relates ; and gold Hath a far greater influence o'er the souls Of mortals than the most persuasive words: With fortune, the propitious heavens conspire To add fresh glories to thy youthful bride, All here submits to her despotic sway. But I my children's exile would redeem, Though at the cost of life, not gold alone. But these adjacent mansions of the king Soon as ye enter, O ye little ones, Your sire's new consort and my queen...
275 ページ - Th' immoderate loves in their career, Nor glory nor esteem attends, But when the Cyprian queen descends Benignant from her starry sphere, No goddess can more justly claim From man the grateful prayer. Thy wrath, O Venus, still forbear, Nor at my tender bosom aim That venomed arrow, ever wont t' inspire Winged from thy golden bow, the pangs of keen desire.
264 ページ - The daughter, and my husband : various means Have I of slaying them, and, O my friends, Am at a loss to fix on which I first Shall undertake, or to consume with flames The bridal mansion, or a dagger plunge Into their bosoms, entering unperceived The chamber where they sleep. But there remains One danger to obstruct my path : if caught Stealing into the palace, and intent On such emprise, in death shall I afford A subject of derision to my foes. This obvious method were the best, in which I am most...
453 ページ - On which I ever dwell. Unhappy women Find comfort in perpetually talking Of what they suffer. But my groans arise Not from one ill, but many ills : the walls Of my loved country razed, my Hector slain, And that hard fortune, in whose yoke bound fast, Thus am I fallen into th' unseemly state Of servitude. We never ought to call Frail mortals happy, at their latest hour Till we behold them to the shades descend. ELEGY. In Helen sure, to Troy's imperial towers Young Paris wafted no engaging bride, But...
181 ページ - Believe me, O Eteocles my son, Old age is not by wretchedness alone Attended : more discreetly than rash youth Experience speaks. Why dost thou woo ambition, That most malignant goddess ? O forbear ! For she's a foe to justice, and hath entered Full many a mansion, many a prosperous city, Nor left them till in ruin she involves All those who harbour her: yet this is she On whom thou doat'st. 'Twere better, O my son, To cultivate equality, who joins Friends, cities, heroes in one steadfast league;...

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