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MOEBIUS.

1. ΙΙ, νάσος Dorico pro νάσους. For this opinion of Pythagoras that souls passed from one body to another, till by length of time and many penances they had purged away all their imperfections, see Virgil Æn. VI. 638, foll., Valerius Flaccus Argon, i. 84 : ‘The restriction of this to the third metempsychosis,' remarks Cowley, 'I do not remember anywhere else. It may be, thrice is taken indefinitely for several

times.' § 406 from the Agamemnon. $ 407 from the Ajax. $ 408 The Ode to Rome, which is generally attributed to Erinna,

has been ascribed by Welcker and others with better right to Melinno, an otherwise obscure poetess of the early part of the Roman period : l. 2, Dea urbis cognominis tutelaris in terrâ solio sceptrisque potitur, eique, ut diis Olympus, ita tellus est inconcussa sedes, άθραυστον, αεί ασφαλες έδος, Vide Homer Odyss. VI. 42 : 1. 5, péoßelpa, veneranda, i.q. πρέσβα: 1. 9, σα υπό σδεύγλα λεπάδνων = υπό ζεύγλη TÛV owv detrádwr: 1. 19, seges fortium virorum cum copia segetum comparatur, quæ proveniunt in agris.

1. 20, καρπόν απ' ανδρών, i. 4. καρπόν ανδρών. § 409 from the First Pythian w. 1—20, see § 333, 1. 13, note :

1. 2, o úvdikov commune : Báors, incessus saltantium, a quo incipiebat comissatio; hinc dylatas å pxà dicitur: l. 3, oduaoi, quum tu sonis tuis signum das: l. 4, duponds Teúxys, i.q. dvaßaxy, ordiaris: Verte simul ac choros regentia exordia cantuum tuorum suscitas et ordiris. DISSEN. 1. 8, γλεφάρων i.q. βλεφάρων: 1. 9, but he in his slumber heaves his supple back, o'erpowered by thy vibrations' (ocmałol, cf. 417, l. 21): 1. 12, Küla tela citharæ : l. 13, αμφί σοφία, per artem: 1. 17, Κιλίκων άντρον, Ηom. ΙΙ. ii.

780: l. 20, xlovos očelas, gelu acutum, Hor. Od. 1. 9. 3. $ 410 from the first Olympian : 1. 1, apòs about the time of, cf.

8 401, 1. 8: 1. 2, έρεφον μέλαν, i. e. ώστε μέλαν είναι: 1. 9, és záply Teletal, 'fuit aut tibi quidquam dulce meum,' Æn. IV. 307: 1. 10, médagov, inhibe, quum a tergo instans transfigeret certantes : 1. 13, ολέσαις 1.q. ολέσας : 1. 15, έψοι γήρας, senectutem foveat omnium laudum expers: 1.17, sed ego non ero talis, mihi certum est subire hoc certamen; tu autem eventum da felicem: 1. 19, neque vero (wv pro oêv) irritas preces fecit:

1. 21, élev, vicit Oenomaum, obtinuit virginem. § 411 from the Sixth Olympian. Keble in a comparison between

Horace's Od. iii. 4, me fabulosa Vulture in Appulo &c. and this passage of Pindar, points out the superiority of the Greek poet to the Roman: he says Horace agit, ut unus vicinorum ; Pindarus vero uárnp ola Opágel, anxie quærit puerum, invento lætatur, Prælect. V. p. 68: 1. I, und

onlyxvw, ex utero matris : 1. 13, Beppeyuévos, cf. Lucret. ii. 820, omnigenis perfusa coloribus ; v. 594, lumen, quod terras omnes cælumque rigando compleat: 1. 14, kai katepáušev propterea faustum verbum pronuntiavit: 1. 18, laoTpopov tiuáv tua, dignitatem aliquam publicam, quæ augeat

res populi. $ 412 "Suavissimum hoc poematium,' says JACOBS, scriptum est

in commendationem coli eburneæ, quam poeta, Miletum vela facturus, Theugenidi, Niciæ Medici conjugi, donum destinavit. Dum ipsam colum, quam habitura sit dominam, docere videtur, honestissimam matronam ejusque maritum ingeniose et urbane laudat: l. 3, Bapo ello' únáptn, θαρσούσομάρτει: πόλιν Νείλεω, Miletus, said to have been founded by Nileus or Neleus, son of Codrus, whence Apollonius Rhodius calls the inhabitants Nnleidal, Argon. i. 959: 1. 4, υπασσαλώ, νulgo υφ' απαλώ. Venus que Mileti imprimis colebatur, templum ibi habuit splendidum in arundineto extructum, unde ή ένα καλάμους sive ή εν έλει nomen accepit : 1. 9, Νικιάας αλόχω, Νικίου αλόχου, i. e. Theugenis: 1. το, άνδρείοις πέπλοις = άνδρείους πέπλους: 1. 11, βράκη, páky: udátwa, thalassina in reference to the colour, (vide Ovid, A. A. III. 177) or as others explain, pellucida, in reference to the texture : 1. 12, δις πέξαιντ' αυτοένει, (st per Theugenidem esset), bis quotannis oves tonderi deberent: 1. 15, non enim volebam te domo tribuere desidiosæ : 1. 17, w $ Epúpas 'Apxlas : Notum est Archia duce coloniam Corintho missam Syracusis dedisse originem, unde Idyll. xvi., Syracusæ appellantur 'Epvpalov ågty, cf. Thucyd. vi. 3. 77. KIESSLING; l. 21,

πεδα, μετά. $ 414 from Edipus Rex, v. 464. § 415 from Trachinia, v. 494: 1. 16, sola fausti tori largitrix

(venustissima, Wunder) dea regebat certamen, HERMANN.

1. 20, kiluakes, luctæ genus, de quo v. Ovid, Metam. IX. 51. $ 416 from Antigone, v. 599. $ 417 from Electra, v. 86: 1. 21, peràs, cf. § 409, v. 9. $ 418 from Helena, v. 1319. $ 419 from Baccha, v. 382. $ 420 from Medea, v. 628. § 421 from Ion, v. 82. § 422 from Alcestis, v. 962. § 423 from Hecuba, v. 925. $ 424 from Andromache, v. 284. § 427 1. 1, imitated, according to J. Warton from G. Buchanan,

Genethliacon Jacobi Sexti:

Sic ubi de patrio redivivus funere Phænix
auroræ ad populos redit, et cunabula secum
ipse sua, , et cineres patris inferiasque decoris

fert humeris: quacunque citis adremigat alis,
indigenæ comitantur aves, celebrantque canoro
agmine: non illas species incognita tantum

aut picturata capiunt spectacula penna :
So Sannazarius de partu Virginis, lib. ii. 415 :

Qualis nostrum cum tendit in orbem
purpureis rutilat pennis nitidissima Phænix,
quam variæ circum volucres comitantur euntem :
illa volans solem nativo provocat auro,
fulva caput: stupet ipsa cohors, plausuque sonoro

per sudum strepit innumeris exercitus alis. $ 444 See Cicero, Tusc. Disp. I. c. xlviii. $ 455 l. 2, ilk, each, kep, catch : 1. 29, ae, one. $ 457 at Hohenlinden (High Lime-trees) a forest near Munich, a

French republican army, under Moreau, defeated the Aus

trians, Dec. 2, 1800. $ 459 The sentiment is borrowed from the well-known fragment of Alcæus :

ου λίθοι τείχεων εν δεδομημένοι, ,

αλλ' άνδρες πόλιος πύργος άρήίοι. $ 464 1. 32, and soft silence, i. q. with soft silence. $ 471 The Scolion, εν μύρτου κλαδί το ξίφος φορήσω, to which

Collins refers, is not the composition of Alcæus but of

Callistratus. $ 472 l. 11, they whom Science loved to name, the family of the

Medici : l. 18, those whose merchant sons were kings, the Venetians: the next line refers to the Doge of Venice : 1. 4, Liguria's state, Genoa : 1. 32, those to whom thy stork is

dear, the Dutch : 1. 33, a British Queen, Elizabeth. $ 477 comp. the epigram of Poseidippus, Fol. Silv. Part I. $ 75. § 520 1. 25, beads, prayers. $ 521-2 Hermotimus, the hero of the ballad, from which this

extract is taken, was a philosopher and prophet of Clazo: menæ who possessed the faculty of effecting a voluntary separation between his soul and body : for the former could wander to any part of the universe, and even hold intercourse with supernatural beings, whilst the senseless frame remained at home. Before attempting any of these äerial flights, he took the precaution to warn his wife, lest, ere the return of his soul, the body should be rendered an unfit receptacle : but she one day committed his body to the flames, and

effectually put a stop to his trances. § 6 1. 25 sconce, head. $ 14. 1. 2 gazet, a small Venetian coin.

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A

ADVERSITY, the school of heroism, 360:

hymn to, 467
Affection, instability of, 337
Age, the golden age, 462
Alcestis, dirge on, 422
Alcæus, ode in imitation of, 459
Alps, the, at day-break, 190
AMPHION, 255
Anacreontic, 351
Angels, guardian, 91
Apollo, to, 324: canticle to, 2
April, to, 133: the first of, 448
Anon, 131, 255
Arion, 131
Arlinkow, the castle of, 341
Art and nature, 488
ASTROPHEL, the death of, 264
Autumn woods, 254

B

BABYLON, fall of, prophesied, 496
Balaam, the prophet, 84: prophecy of,

Boy, the mountain-boy, 184: the Greek,

363
Bowl, the flowing, 167
Britannia, song to, 51, 443
BROWNE, WILLIAM, sonnet to, 33

с
Calm after a storm, description of, 200
Castara, the description of, 281
Cato's soliloquy, 511
Ceres, the revenge of, 418
Charity, 26
CHARLES II, king, the restoration of,

427
Cheerfulness, 28
Child, lines to a, embracing his mo-

ther, 157
Childhood, scenes of, revisited, 155:

the poet's recollections of, 253
Chloris ill, 73
Christmas carol, 293
Christ, resurrection of, 510
Christian warfare, 475
Cicada, to the, 68
Clyde, to the, 43
COMFORTER, the, 209
Conqueror, the last, 206
Constancy, 22, 511
Consumption, sonnet to, 135
Contemplation, to, 45, 148, 364, 491
Content and rich, 38, 39, 40, 45
Content, sweet, 124
Contentment, 45: hymn to, 235, 236, 278

505
Bard, memory of the, 96
Beauty, 517: the true, 37, 106: the

soul of, 241: and grief, 75
Bene qui latuit bene vixit, 308
Blindness, Milton's sonnet on his

own, 112
Blossoms, to, 270
Blyth, to the river, 482

Contrast, the, 94

Epitaph, on the Lady Mary Villiers,
Coral insect, to the, 214

80, 215: of the living author, 246
Corinna's going a Maying, 520

Eton College, ode on a distant prospect
Cromwell's return from Ireland, 447 of, 456
Culver, the, 107

Evening hymn, 5: the hour of, 169:
CUMBERLAND, Lady Margaret, Coun- evening repose, 180: expostulation,
tess of, 232, 233

the, 474
Cypress, the wreath of, 336

Extreme of love or hate, 216
CYRENE, 401

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Daffodils, to, 181
Daisy, to the, 211, 212: to a mountain,

365, 366
David's supplication to Michal, 150,

151: lamentation over Saul and Jo-

nathan, 498
Day, the longest, 301
Death, to, 476: of the good, 13: em-

blem of, 86: invocation of, 138: night-
piece on, 144: of a son 182, of a
young lady, 186—189: the weapons
of, 206: memorials of, 291: the great

leveller, 361, 362
Decease, release, 444
Deianira, the combat for, 415
Despondency, 165
Diana, hymn to, 267: song of, 323
Dirge, 288, 346: a mother's over her

child, 204, 289: at sea, 287
Disappointment, on, 367
Distaff, the, 412
Dominvs dominantivm, 202
Doom, the common, 206
Drinking song, 69
Duty, the path of, 20

Falcon, the, 386
Fame, vanity of, 100, 101, 102, 103,

432 : indifference to, 251
Fancy, ode to, 302
Farewell, a, 208
Farm, the poet on leaving his, 340
Field flowers, 514
Firmament, the, 393-4
Flowers from a Roman wall, 15
Fortune, to, 29: Enid's song to, 67:

proof against, 235, 236: her spite
quelled by patience, 284: the uncer-
tainty of, 434

G

Gaiety, 82
God, love of, 425, insensibility to the

mercies of, 244: address to, 339
Good, the, alone great, 321: their hap-

piness in a future state, 405, 428 :

death of the, 13
Gratitude, its sweetness, 11, 428
Grace, native, 488
Grave, 234
Greece, modern, 263
Grief and beauty, 75

E

H

Earth, bounty of the, 63
Echo, song to, 146, 159: echoes, 260
Ecstasy, the, 389
ELECTRA, the lament of, 417
Elegy, 185: on Captain Henderson,

455
ELIZABETH's song, 70
Elysium, 227–229; description of, 405
Enchantment, the, 60
England, caution to, 85: lines address-

ed to, 145: complaint of the miseries

HALLAM, Arthur Henry, to the me-

mory of, 305, 306, 307
Hamlet, the, 347, 348
Happiness, 308: true, 468
Heaven, 154, 265, 309, 483: in pros-

pect, 242, 243
HEBER, Bishop, verses to his wife, 320
Hellas, the restoration of, 158, 275:

sorrows of, for the loss of her heroes
before Troy, 406

of, 359

ENID's song, 67

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