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'tis sweet to see the evening star appear;

'tis sweet to listen as the night-winds creep from leaf to leaf; 'tis sweet to view on high

the rainbow, based on ocean, span the sky.

LORD BYRON

19

LITTLE IS BEST

HE

E that is down need fear no fall,

he that is low no pride; he that is humble ever shall

have God to be his guide.
Fulness to such a burthen is

that go on pilgrimage;
here little, and hereafter bliss,
is best from age to age.

SIR W. SCOTT

20

THE PATH OF DUTY

NOT

OT once or twice in our rough island story

the path of duty was the way to glory :
he that walks it, only thirsting
for the right, and learns to deaden
love of self, before his journey closes
he shall find the stubborn thistle bursting
into glossy purples, which outredden
all voluptuous garden-roses.

21

VISIONS OF DEPARTED JOY'S

WHEN midnight o’er the moonless skies

her pall of transient death has spread,
when mortals sleep, when spectres rise,
and none are wakeful but the dead;
no bloodless shape my way pursues,
no sheeted ghost my couch annoys,
visions more sad my fancy views,-
visions of long-departed joys.

W. R. SPENSER 22

THE DYING MAIDEN'S SONG

AY a garland on my hearse of the dismal yew;

.

My love was false, but I was firm from my hour of birth; upon my buried body lie lightly, gentle earth !

BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER

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MY fortune might I form at will,

,
my canvas Zephyrs soft should fill
with gentle breath, lest ruder gales
crack the main-yard or burst the sails :
by winds that temperately blow
the barque should pass secure and slow,
nor scare me leaning on her side :
but smoothly cleave the unruffled tide.

J. ADDISON

24

A SLUMBER hlid am fcepisit seal;

I had no human fears :
she seemed a thing that could not feel

the touch of earthly years.
No motion has she now, no force ;

she neither hears nor sees ;
rolled round in earth's diurnal course
with rocks, and stones, and trees !

W. WORDSWORTH

25

THE VANITY OF TEARS

Έι τα δάκρυ' ημίν των κακών ήν φάρμακον,
αεί θ ο κλαύσας του πονείν επαύετο,
ήλλαττόμεσθ' αν δάκρυα δόντες χρυσίον
νύν δ' ου προσέχει τα πράγματουδ' αποβλέπει
εις ταύτα, δέσποτ', αλλά την αυτην οδον,
εάν τε κλαίης άν τε μη, πορεύσεται.
Τί ούν ποιείς πλέον και ουδέν η λύπη δ' έχει,
ώσπερ το δένδρον τούτο καρπον, το δάκρυον.

PHILEMON

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ΟΗ,

H, golden link connecting man with man,

celestial charity ! oh, rarely seen since lust of rule and thirst of gold began

unhallowed reign-whene'er thy look serene

sheds placid influence, how. the softened mien and softened heart consenting own thy sway !

thus rifted ice, enchained by winter keen, thawed by the sun, in rivers rolls away, and glads the parched waste and sparkles to the day.

GALLY KNIGHT

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Είς όρος, μία δε βροτοίς έστιν ευτυχίας οδος,
θυμόν είτις έχων απενθή δύναται διατελεϊν βίον:
οίς δε μέριμνα μεν αμφιπολεί φρενί,
το δε παρ' αμάρ τε και νύκτα μελλόντων χάριν
εον ιάπτεται κέαρ, άκαρπον έχει πόνον:
τί γαρ ελαφρoν έτ' έστιν άπρηκτοδυρόμενον δονείν
καρδίαν;

BACCHYLIDES

29

TO FORTUNE

O
H, Fortune, how thy restless wavering state

hath fraught with cares my troubled wit!
witness this present prison, whither fate

could bear me, and the joys I quit:

thou causedest the guilty to be losed
from bands wherein are innocents inclosed,

causing the guiltless to be strait reserved

and freeing those that death had well deserved. But by her envy can be nothing wrought, so God send to my foes all they have thought.

QUEEN ELIZABETH

30

THE GOOD LIFE LONG LIFE

IT

is not growing like a tree

in bulk, doth make Man better be;
or standing long an oak, three hundred year,
to fall a log at last, dry, bald and sere:

a lily of a day

is fairer far in May,
although it fall and die that night-

it was the plant and flower of Light.
In small proportions we just beauties see;
and in short measures life may perfect be.

B. JONSON

31

ON A GRECIAN URN

WHO
THO are these coming to the sacrifice?

to what green altar, O mysterious priest, lead'st thou that heifer lowing at the skies,

and all her silken flanks with garlands drest?
what little town by river or sea-shore,
or mountain-built with peaceful citadel,

is emptied of its folk, this pious morn?
and, little town, thy streets for evermore
will silent be; and not a soul to tell,
why thou art desolate, can e'er return.

J. KEATS

32

GOOD PRECEPTS

N

still with a well-prepared breast; nor let thy shackles make thee sad; thou canst but have, what others had. And this for comfort thou must know, times that are ill wont still be so:

Clouds will not ever pour down rain:
a sullen day will clear again :
first peals of thunder we must hear,
then lutes and harps shall stroke the ear.

R. HERRICK

33

TO MR WILLIAM BROWNE

O much a stranger my severer Muse

reed,

but that she knows some rites of Phæbus' dues,

of Pan, of Pallas and her sister's meed. Read and commend she durst these tuned essays

of him that loves her (she hath ever found her studies as one circle). Next she prays his readers be with rose and myrtle crowned ! no willow touch them! As his bays are free from wrong of bolts, so may their chaplets be!

J. SELDEN

34

AGA

MIDNIGHT SOUNDS
GAIN those sounds sweep on

crushing the air to sweetness;
they came and they are gone;
again my dreams desert me;
I sit once more alone.

When from some doomed city

her gods depart, such sound
of mixed reproof and pity,

in refluent airs half drowned,
is heard at night among the crowds,

by kneelers on the ground.

A. DE VERE

35

LIFE THROUGH DEATH
DEW-DROP, falling on the wild sea-wave,

A ;

but in a shell received, that drop of dew
unto a pearl of marvellous beauty grew;
and, happy now, the grace did magnify
which thrust it forth, as it had feared, to die ;--

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