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204

A MOTHER'S DIRGE OVER HER CHILD

RING me flowers all young and sweet,

where calm thou sleepest, baby fair,
with roseless cheek and auburn hair.
No more, my baby, shalt thou lie,
with drowsy smile and half-shut eye,
pillowed upon my fostering breast,
serenely sinking into rest !
The grave must be thy cradle now,
the wild flowers o'er thy breast shall grow,
while still my heart, all full of thee,
in widowed solitude shall be.
No taint of earth, no thought of sin,
e'er dwelt thy stainless breast within,
and God hath laid thee down to sleep,
like a pure pearl below the deep.

D, M. MOIR

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CALM

,

'ALM
is the morn

a ,
calm as to suit a calmer grief,
and only through the faded leaf
the chesnut pattering to the ground:
calm and deep peace on this high wold,

and on these dews that drench the furze,

and all the silvery gossamers
that twinkle into green and gold:
calm and still light on yon great plain

that sweeps with all its autumn bowers,

and crowded farms and lessening towers
to mingle with the bounding main:
calm and deep peace in this wide air,

these leaves that redden in the fall;

and in my heart if calm at all,
if any calm, a calm despair:
F. S. II.

6

calm on the seas, and silver sleep,

and waves that sway themselves in rest,

and dead calm in that noble breast which heaves but with the heaving deep.

A. TENNYSON

206

THE LAST CONQUEROR
VICTORIOUS men of earth, no more

proclaim how wide your empires are;
though you bind in every shore,
and your triumphs reach as far

as night or day,
yet you, proud monarchs, must obey,
and mingle with forgotten ashes, when
death calls ye to the crowd of common men,
Devouring Famine, Plague, and War,

each able to undo mankind,
death's servile emissaries are;
nor to these alone confined,

he hath at will
more quaint and subtle ways to kill;
a smile or kiss, as he will use the art,
shall have the cunning skill to break a heart.

J. SHIRLEY

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TRU
"RUST not, sweet soul, those curled waves of gold

with gentle tides that on your temples flow,
nor temples spread with flakes of virgin snow,
nor snow of cheeks with Tyrian grain enrolled.
Trust not those shining lights which wrought my woe
when first I did their azure rays behold,
nor voice whose sounds more strange effects do show
than of the Thracian harper have been told ;
look to this dying lily, fading rose,
dark hyacinth, of late whose blushing beams
made all the neighbouring herbs and grass rejoice,
and think how little is twixt's life's extremes :
the cruel tyrant that did kill those flowers
shall once, ay me! not spare that spring of yours.

W. DRUMMOND

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FLOW

FLOW down, cold rivulet, to the sea,
thy

tribute wave deliver;
no more by thee my steps shall be,

for ever and for ever.
Flow, softly flow, by lawn and lea,

A rivulet then a river;
no where by thee my steps shall be,

for ever and for ever.

But here will sigh thine alder tree,

and here thine aspen shiver;
and here by thee will hum the bee,

for ever and for ever,

A thousand suns will stream on thee,

A thousand moons will quiver; but not by thee my steps shall be, for ever and for ever.

A. TENNYSON

209

LITANY OF THE HOLY SPIRIT

IN
N the hour of my distress,

when temptations sore oppress,
and when I my sins confess,

sweet Spirit, comfort me !
When I lie within my bed,
sick in heart and sick in head,
and with doubts discomfited,

sweet Spirit, comfort me!
When the house doth sigh and weep,
and the world is drowned in sleep,
yet mine eyes their vigils keep,

sweet Spirit, comfort me!
When the Judgment is revealed,
and that open which was sealed,
when to Thee I have appealed,

sweet Spirit, comfort me!

R. HERRICK

210

JOHN ANDERSON

JOH

OHN Anderson my jo, John,

when we were first acquent your locks were like the raven,

your bonnie brow was brent; but now your brow is bald, John,

your locks are like the snow;
but blessings on your frosty pow,

John Anderson my jo.
John Anderson my jo, John,

we clamb the hill thegither,
and monie a cantie day, John,

we've had wi' ane anither;
now we maun totter down, John,

but hand in hand we'll go,
and sleep thegither at the foot,

John Anderson my jo.

R. BURNS

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THE

HEE Winter in the garland wears

that thinly decks his few grey hairs;
Spring parts the clouds with softest airs,

that she may sun thee;
whole Summer-fields are thine by right;
and Autumn, melancholy Wight!
doth in thy crimson head delight

when rains are on thee.
Be violets in their secret mews
the flowers the wanton Zephyrs choose;
proud be the rose, with rains and dews

her head impearling;
thou liv'st with less ambitious aim,
yet hast not gone without thy fame;
thou art indeed by many a claim

the Poet's darling.
212 If to a rock from rains he fly,

or, some bright day of April sky,
imprisoned by hot sunshine lie

near the green holly,

and wearily at length should fare;
he needs but look about, and there
thou art !-a friend at hand, to scare

his melancholy.
Child of the year! that round dost run
thy pleasant course,—when day's begun
as ready to salute the sun

as lark or leveret,
thy long-lost praise thou shalt regain;
nor be less dear to future men
than in old time;—thou not in vain
art Nature's favourite.

W. WORDSWORTH

213

PROOF TO NO PURPOSE

Y.

U see this gentle stream that glides,

shov'd on by quick succeeding tides:
try if this sober stream you can
follow to the wilder ocean:
and see, if there it keeps unspent
in that congesting element:
next, from that world of waters, then
by pores and caverns back again
induc'd that inadulterate same
stream to the spring from whence it came :
this with a wonder when ye do,
as easy, and else easier too,
then may ye recollect the grains
of my particular remains;
after a thousand lustres hurld,
by ruffling winds, about the world.

R. HERRICK

TH

214

TO THE CORAL INSECT
OIL on! toil on! ye ephemeral train,

who build in the tossing and treacherous main;
toil on,- for the wisdom of man ye mock,
with your sand-based structures and domes of rock;
your columns the fathomless fountains lave,
and your arches spring up through the crested wave ;
you're a puny race, thus to boldly rear
a fabric so vast in a realm so drear.

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