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in my small pinnace I can sail,
contemning all the blustering roar;

and running with a merry gale,
with friendly stars my safety seek
within some little winding creek;

and see the storm, ashore

J. DRYDEN

TAKE

237

ON RETURNING A BLANK BOOK 'AKE back the virgin page,

white and unwritten still ;
some hand, more calm and sage,

the leaf must fill :
thoughts come, as pure as light,

pure as e’en you require:
but oh! each word I write

love turns to fire.
Yet let me keep the book ;

oft shall my heart renew,
when on its leaves I look,

dear thoughts of you:
like you 'tis fair and bright;

like you, too bright and fair,
to let wild passion write

one wrong wish there. 238 Haply when from those eyes

far, far away I roam, should calmer thoughts arise

towards you and home; fancy may trace some line,

worthy those eyes to meet ; thoughts that not burn, but shine,

pure, calm and sweet. And, as o'er ocean far

seamen their records keep, led by some hidden star

through the cold deep ; so may the words I write

tell through what storms I stray; you still the unseen light,

guiding my way.

T, MOORE

239

THE PROGRESS OF POESY FROM GREECE TO

ITALY AND FROM ITALY TO ENGLAND

,
isles, that crown th' Ægean deep,
fields, that cool Ilissus laves,
or where Mæander's amber waves
in lingering lab'rinths creep ;
how do your tuneful echoes languish,
mute, but to the voice of anguish!
Where each old poetic mountain

inspiration breathed around ;
every shade and hallow'd fountain

murmur'd deep a solemn sound;
till the sad Nine, in Greece's evil hour,

left their Parnassus for the Latian plains.
Alike they scorn the pomp of tyrant Power,

and coward Vice, that revels in her chains. When Latium had her lofty spirit lost, they sought, O Albion! next thy sea-encircled coast.

T. GRAY

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240

TO A STAR
FAIR and goodly star, upon the brow of night,
that from thy silver car shootest thy friendly

light,
thy path is calm and bright
through the clear azure of the starry way;
and from thy heavenly height
thou see'st how empires rise and pass away,
thou view'st the birth of human hopes-

their blossom and decay.
Oh! that my spirit could cast off its mould of clay,
and with the wise and good fly from this toil away;

that with thy bright array
we might look down upon the world of woe,

even as the god of day
looks on the listless ocean's flow,
and eyes the fighting waves

that part and foam below. F. S. II.

7

241

THE SOUL OF BEAUTY
"HE shape alone let others prize,

I look for spirit in her eyes,

and meaning in her air.
A damask cheek, an ivory arm,

shall ne'er my wishes win ;
give me an animated form

that speaks a mind within ;
a face where awful honour shines,

where sense and sweetness move,
and angel innocence refines

the tenderness of love.
These are the soul of beauty's frame;

without whose vital aid
unfinished all her features seem,
and all her roses dead.

M. AKENSIDE HEAVEN IN PROSPECT

242

THEX. are all gone into the world of light!

Their very memory is fair and bright,

and my sad thoughts doth clear.
It glows and glitters in my cloudy breast,

like stars upon some gloomy grove,
or those faint beams in which this hill is drest

after the sun's remove.
I see them walking in an air of glory,

whose light doth trample on my days;
my days, which are at best but dull and hoary,

meer glimmering and decays.
He that hath found some fledg'd bird's nest may know

at first sight if the bird be flown:
but what fair dell or grove he sings in now,

that is to him unknown.
243 And yet, as Angels in some brighter dreams

call to the soul when man doth sleep,
so some strange thoughts transcend our wonted

themes,
and into glory peep.

If a star were confin'd into a tomb,

her captive flames must needs burn there; but when the hand that lockt her up gives room,

she'll shine through all the sphere.
O Father of eternal life, and all

created glories under thee,
resume thy spirit from this world of thrall

into true liberty!
Either disperse these mists, which blot and fill

my perspective still as they pass;
or else remove me hence unto that hill
where I shall need no glass.

H, VAUGHAN

244

INSENSIBILITY TO GOD'S MERCIES

H , ,

that, ere the glorious sun be born,
by some soft touch invisible
around his path are taught to swell;-
thou rustling breeze so fresh and gay,
that dancest forth at opening day,
and brushing by with joyous wing,
wakenest each little leaf to sing ;-
ye fragrant clouds of dewy steam,
by which deep grove and tangled stream
pay, for soft rains in season given,
their tribute to the genial Heaven:
why waste your treasures of delight
upon our thankless, joyless sight;
who day by day to sin awake,
seldom of Heaven and you partake ?

J. KEBLE

245

THE SEAMEN'S SONG

'ER the rolling waves we go,

blow,

to quell with fire and sword the foe,

that dares give us vexation.

Sailing to each foreign shore,
despising hardships we endure,
wealth we often do bring o'er

that does enrich the nation.

Noble-hearted seamen are
those that do no labour spare,
nor no danger shun or fear,

to do their country pleasure.
In loyalty they do abound,
nothing base in them is found,
but they bravely stand their ground

in calm and stormy weather.

246

THE LIVING AUTHOR'S EPITAPH

ROM life's superfluous cares enlarg'd,

F of

here Cowley lies, beneath this shed,
to every worldly interest dead:
with decent poverty content;
his hours of ease not idly spent;
to fortune's goods a foe profess’d,
and hating wealth, by all caress'd.
'Tis sure, he's dead; for lo! how small
a spot of earth is now his all !
O! wish that earth may lightly lay,
and every care be far away!
bring flowers, the short-liv'd roses bring,
to life deceas'd fit offering !
and sweets around the poet strow,
whilst yet with life his ashes glow.

J. ADDISON

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LIQUID Peneus was flowing,

in Pelion's shadow, outgrowing
the light of the dying day,

speeded with my sweet pipings.

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